COLLEGE STATION, TX, United States
COLLEGE STATION, TX, United States
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Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 402.68K | Year: 2016

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant Many industrial processes produce difficult to treat wastewater containing environmental contaminates in the form of dissolved solids that must be purified before being discharged Typically wastewaters are generated from metal finishing and plating operations rinsing of printed circuit boards and semiconductors during fabrication water used for cleaning and painting in automotive manufacturing food and beverage concentration of wastewater for reuse and reduction of BODs prior to discharge pharmaceutical manufacturing as well as landfill leachate In many cases wastewaters cannot be treated cost effectively As a result massive quantities of unpurified wastewater is land applied for disposal disposed of underground or discharged into our surface water supply leading to a significant impact on the environment It has been observed that all conventional membrane processes currently used for wastewater purification are hampered by some form of membrane fouling When treating wastewater using an osmosis membrane process pretreatment of the wastewater is typically necessary to protect the membrane from organic fouling mineral scaling and chemical degradation During our Phase I effort we developed an advanced osmosis membrane technology with greatly improved anti fouling characteristics by successfully modifying commercially available osmosis membranes with graphene oxide and superhydrophilic nanoparticle coatings These modified membranes showed excellent antifouling characteristics and improved durability under challenge tests using high concentrations of organic and inorganic foulants Furthermore the modification process is universally transferable to all commercially available membrane technologies used for wastewater purification During the Phase II effort Lynntech will work to further advance this novel technology with specific aims devised to optimize the membrane coating technology leading towards commercial scale up and perform outside testing at a commercial facility These aims include further optimization and improvement of the modification processes scale up the modification processes geared towards viable commercialization and packaging and testing the final product in a commercial setting Successful completion of the specific aims will facilitate the pathway to commercialization of the novel technology with applications beyond the wastewater treatment e g desalination food processing and pharmaceuticals Implementation of these enhanced anti fouling membranes will greatly reduce the membrane fouling within a wastewater purification system reducing the necessary maintenance while maintaining or improving high purification standards PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE This project will produce advanced anti fouling osmosis membrane technology for the purification of contaminated wastewater sources These improvements have a direct impact towards reducing system maintenance and component consumables within membrane based purification systems leading to an overall reduction in system costs This will ultimately lead to improved water purification standards due to an increased adoption of membrane separation techniques in commercial and industrial wastewater purification systems


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 833.46K | Year: 2016

PROJECT SUMMARY Lynntech has developed a process to readily identify specific genomic loci in RNA based bacteriophage and viruses Although we developed a simple automated sample preparation device SPM that will purify genomic RNA for downstream processing such as reverse transcription we also demonstrated direct RT PCR amplification of a specific dengue locus using our convective units This direct detection of dengue eliminates the need for an independent sample preparation step in the diagnosis of dengue infection In addition we have transitioned our convective amplification units to perform RNA reverse transcription RT as well as DNA amplification PCR Lynntechandapos s convective RT PCR reaction has successfully identified genomic loci within the MS bacteriophage two strains of the Ebola virus and the four serotypes of the dengue virus The convective assay is based on the principle that two different temperatures at the ends of a cylinder will result in a buoyancy driven steady circulatory flow between those ends Thus PCR reagents in the cylinder will flow through a temperature gradient allowing the necessary steps for amplification denaturation annealing and elongation Convective amplification is rather appealing in that it requires very little power Because reagents circulate within a temperature gradient there is no need for temperature ramping and power is not needed to cool and then heat the reaction So the convective system can be powered by batteries and can provide a portable means to perform RT PCR at the point of care In addition this portable RT PCR device can be quite inexpensive Lynntech has demonstrated the reverse transcription and subsequent cDNA amplification of MS Ebola and dengue RNA using convective RT PCR Our data indicated excellent specificity for both the Ebola virus and the dengue virus Notably for the dengue virus we were able readily distinguish the four serotypes in our convective RT PCR assay despite the fact that the genomes of these four serotypes share homology In addition our convective RT PCR assay was quite sensitive We were able to easily detect less than genomic copies of the dengue virus in our assay This would equate to less than L of plasma from an infected patient Indeed these data underscore the applicability of our convective assay to the diagnosis of dengue infection at the point of care in resource limited regions of the world During Phase II of this program Lynntech will further develop our convective amplification system into a single portable one step unit that can be used beyond the confines of the traditional laboratory to diagnose dengue infection as well as to study RNA processes We will transition this system to a multiplex assay that will identify the four dengue serotypes in a single reaction This assay will combine our portable genome amplification module with a sophisticated gold nanoparticle based lateral flow system to provide a point of care detection and identification assay for the dengue virus Lynntech proposes to develop a simple sample to answer point of care diagnostic for dengue virus combining convective RT PCR with lateral flow analysis The assay will be capable of detecting and indentifying each of the four dengue serotypes in human samples As a next generation tool for delivering diagnostic analyses into the hands of health care professionals the proposed device will provide necessary resources where traditional tests are not available


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 231.12K | Year: 2016

PROJECT SUMMARY Insect borne disease is a world wide problem of enormous scale and devastating impact particularly in less developed countries Despite the development of new insecticides current techniques of using a single insecticide over long periods of time for mosquito control result in acquired resistance posing a significant risk of loss of effectiveness of insecticides This proposal describes a novel approach to the formation of insecticidal bednets Instead of using a chemical insecticide bed nets are modified to have unique physical properties to deter insect contact with the clothing thereby minimizing the risk of bites or stings The protective surface finish does not present any health hazard no harmful chemicals are released into the environment and the finish can potentially be universally applied to multiple fabric types with only minimal changes to the fabric s physical properties including breathability comfort This Proof of concept study will develop an industrially viable and scalable process for production of bed net fabric materials with non chemical insect protection It is expected that once the science has been established for bed net clothing the proposed non chemical insect repellant textiles will have multiple applications including outdoor sportswear wall coverings window curtains and outdoor upholstery items Non chemical methods are less vulnerable to biological resistance and could help reduce disease prevalence In the developed world the sports and recreation market is a substantial commercial opportunity PROJECT NARRATIVE This proposal describes development of next generation of insecticidal textiles that will rely solely on non chemical non toxic and risk free insecticidal properties for use in clothing and bedding These textiles will be impenetrable by the insect and will protect the individual from bites Additionally the textiles will protect the broader community by disabling the mosquitoes ability to transmit disease by killing it on contact


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 236.52K | Year: 2016

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant Ulcerative keratitis caused by infectious microbes bacteria fungi amoebae and viruses represents a major area of medical concern It is one of the most important causes of corneal opacifications which is the second common cause of legal blindness world wide after cataracts In in the USA alone of the approximately doctorandapos s office and outpatient clinic and emergency department visits related to ocular distress and emergencies resulted in antibiotic prescriptions for microbil keratitis The total annual financial burden on our healthcare system for keratitis cases was estimated to be $ million in direct health care expenditures in and was also estimated to consume over annual hours of clinician time Bacterial keratitis manifests as corneal ulcer corneal edema and or hypopyon and can cause significant complications including corneal perforation corneal thinning elevated intraocular pressure and progression to endophthalmitis This could lead to severe clinical outcomes including partial or complete vision loss necessity for penetrating keratoplasty corneal grafts enucleation and evisceration Although topical and systemic antibiotics are effective in reducing microbial loads in keratitis cases unless the microbe is resistant to the antibiotic utilized the time required to resolve th infection is generally quite lengthy Furthermore antibiotics are typically ineffective in reducin inflammation and evoking regenerative repair of corneal and or scleral defects and scarring which may be induced by the infection Lynntech Inc in collaboration with the University of Mississippi Medical Center proposes to develop an innovative inexpensive and compact device termed iCAP to effectively treat microbial keratitis at the point of diagnosis This device will be engineered to rapidly and reagentlessly significantly reduce or totally eliminate bacterial loads regardless of antimicrobial susceptibility status of the infecting microbial species Furthermore iCAP has the potential to simultaneously trigger certain cellular signaling pathways which could result in improved regeneration of corneal and scleral defects induced by the infection During this Phase I SBIR effort our specific aims are to design and fabricate prototype iCAP devices utilize in vitro microbial and mammalian cell culture techniques to obtain pilot ranges of iCAP device operating parameters likely to be effective in vivo and demonstrate that iCAP can significantly reduce or eliminate bacterial loads and orchestrate healing of infection induced corneal scleral defects in a relevant in vivo rabbit eye model of bacterial keratitis The successful completion of these specific aims should demonstrate ample feasibility of this innovative new microbial keratitis treatment approach and will enable us to execute more comprehensive technology development and commercialization thrusts in a future follow on Phase II effort The eventual commercial availability of iCAP devices is likely to sustai high positive impact for the patient populace suffering from microbial keratitis PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE The potential long term impact of this SBIR effort is an effective new paradigm in the treatment of microbial keratitis right at the point of diagnosis Our envisioned automated iCAP devices have the potential to not only resolve the infection in a faster timeframe than with the use of antibiotics but also heal eye defects induced as a consequence of the infection iCAP could thus provide significant clinical benefit for microbial keratitis patients worldwide and enable faster healing coupled with lowered costs of treatment


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 294.00K | Year: 2016

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers DFU represent a major area of medical concern Of the approximately million diabetic patients in the USA almost million display these types of partial thickness wounds More than diabetes related lower extremity amputations LEAs are conducted annually in the USA alone Fully eighty five percent of LEAs in diabetic patients are preceded by biofilm phenotype infections in foot ulceration It is recently being recognized that an added primary impediment to the healing of DFU is such biofilm phenotype infections DFU entrenched biofilms consist of polymicrobial populations of cells encased in hydrated extracellular polymeric substances that are tightly attached to the wound surface The biofilm phenotype imparts considerable resilience to these infections and current modalities including surgical debridement topical and systemic antimicrobials topical biocides and topical anti biofilm agents have major limitations in effectively killing resident bacteria and more clinically importantly completely removing biofilm from the wound bed Traditional wound management modalities such as grafts advanced bioengineered dressings and negative pressure wound therapy cannot be applied with any expectation of success without first extensively debriding the wound Lynntech Inc in collaboration with Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and in consultation with the Southwest Regional Wound Care Center proposes to develop an innovative inexpensive and compact chronic wound management device termed SNAPCAP which has the potential to be applied to bioburdened chronic wounds to overcome the limitations of existing modalities This device will be engineered to rapidly and reagentlessly remove biofilm from the wound bed without relying on surgical debridement and to subsequently apply a follow on therapy that has the potential to improve the healing of debrided chronic wounds During this Phase I SBIR effort our specific Aims are to design and fabricate prototype SNAPCAP devices optimize SNAPCAP performance for biofilm removal and epithelial gap reduction in vitro using a human skin equivalent tissue model of infected wound healing and preliminarily evaluate the utility of SNAPCAP in vivo using a murine model of splinted full thickness polymicrobial biofilm infected diabetic wound healing The successful completion of these specific Aims should demonstrate ample feasibility of this innovative new chronic wound management approach and will allow us to plan more comprehensive technology development and commercialization thrusts in a future follow on Phase II effort The eventual commercial availability of SNAPCAP devices is likely to sustain high positive impact for the patient populace suffering from chronic wounds that are bioburdened in particular polymicrobial biofilm infected DFU PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE The potential long term impact of this SBIR effort is a new paradigm in the clinical management of chronic wounds such as polymicrobial biofilm infected DFU Our envisioned automated SNAPCAP wound treatment devices may provide significant clinical benefit for the millions of diabetic patients suffering from bio burdened DFU This approach may have the potential to greatly improve the quality of life of patients suffering from DFU while simultaneously lowering the costs pain and risks associated with routine maintenance debridement procedures


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2015

Sand/dust particles have significant detrimental effects on turbine engine performance and durability. Current inertial particle separators are inadequate to achieve filtration/separation of fine particles. A novel electrostatic method is proposed to improve their efficiency by charging and agglomerating the fine particles. The method is based on a unique application of a low temperature plasma technology called corona discharge and turbulent mixing. The method will be optimized and scaled up for qualification in ground test environment. The resulting technology will be lightweight, flexible in design, adaptable to variations in flight conditions and offer minimal resistance to engine air flow.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 998.49K | Year: 2015

Timely management and closure of burn wounds are critical for proper emergency care and the assurance of positive outcomes for the warfighter. Current technologies rely on reagents that cannot respond effectively to the different classes of pathogens that


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 994.07K | Year: 2015

Our warfighters are at great risk of large area burn wounds from incendiary munitions and improvised devices. Limitations of currently utilized field dressings greatly increase incidences of wound infection, further deterioration, shock and fatalities during CASEVAC to higher echelon levels of military medical care. During Phase I, Lynntech demonstrated strong proof-of-concept in vitro for a novel approach, termed StABL-SD, to rapidly and reagentlessly sterilize and simultaneously encase burn wounds within a thin film dressing, which provides prophylaxis against infectious pathogens, controlled oxygen and vapor transport, and active support for proliferative wound healing. In this proposed Phase II effort, we will fabricate prototype StABL-SD devices and demonstrate their utility in vivo using an accepted porcine model of thermal burn wound healing. StABL-SD can be utilized by minimally trained personnel in the theater of battle to stabilize burn casualties immediately after wounding for safer, non-deteriorative and more comfortable transport encased in the protective film dressing. StABL-SD is of direct relevance to the unmet DOD need for improving warfighter survivability during transport stateside while simultaneously improving eventual treatment outcomes. Commercial deployment of StABL-SD in future Phases will enable improved military and civilian burn casualty stabilization for successful and survivable transport to burn units.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 996.83K | Year: 2015

Platelets play a central role in hemostasis and are responsible for many inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and thrombic events in human beings. A significant portion of post-trauma deaths are related to coagulopathy or hemorrhage events for both injured soldiers and civilian patients. Several platelet function analyzers have been designed and developed; however due to form-factor and/or limited analysis capabilities these systems do not function effectively as point-of-care (POC) instruments. In Phase I Lynntech developed a novel, rapid test cartridge to measure an individual platelet receptor contribution to platelet coagulation in whole blood through an electrochemical-fluidics system. As part of a follow-on effort in Phase II, Lynntech proposes to expand the test cartridge to simultaneously analyze multiple platelet receptor contributions to platelet coagulation. The system automation will be designed such that a single, small blood sample will be fully analyzed within a disposable cartridge to minimize user effort and error.


Grant
Agency: Department of Agriculture | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 599.99K | Year: 2016

A leading public health problem affecting individuals world-wide is food poisoning. Pathogen contamination of post-harvest food sources is a major health issue. There is a wealth of information and data that indicate that the occurrence of infectious gastrointestinal diseases is globally on the rise; and that food-borne pathogens can readily adapt to environmental changes, contributing significantly to this escalation. In addition, there are major challenges in the development of timely and economical methods to identify pathogens from food samples suspected of causing these illnesses. Lynntech is developing an Adaptable, Label-free, Affordable, Rapid, Mobile (ALARM) system that will detect genomic nucleic acids purified from select pathogens responsible for food-related diseases. The ALARM technology is designed to be an integrated system that will perform pathogen nucleic acid amplification, as well as target detection using an innovative, field-ready, mobile system.Lynntech has established a highly innovative method to detect multiple genomic loci from each of three select food-borne pathogens using convective PCR. The three pathogens are: Salmonella species (spp.), Campylobacter spp., and E. coli (STEC). During Phase I, we successfully developed a multiplex convective PCR assay using primers specific for two loci within the genomes of each of the three bacterial pathogens. In addition, we included a single primer pair specific for an independent locus that serves as our internal positive control (IPC). Amplification of the IPC tells the user that the reaction is functioning properly. This represented a 7-plex convective amplification assay. In addition, Lynntech has developed and optimized a detection system that allows us to identify the convective PCR products in an economical, portable, label-free manner. This is a FET-based system that will signal if the pathogen is present in the food sample. If the food source is not contaminated, then there will be no signal. The IPC will signal for all reactions. Notably, both our multiplex convective amplification reaction and our FET-based detection system require low power, thus providing portability to the system.During Phase II, we will optimize amplification and detection. We will integrate these modules into a single system to detect food-borne pathogens at the point-of-use (in the field). By doing so, the Lynntech ALARM system will provide the global community with a rapid, portable, label-free means to detect pathogens responsible for food-related illnesses. This device will require minimal user training and will be applicable to the detection of multiple pathogens from a variety of food-related matrices. The Lynntech ALARM system will be applicable to both deliberate and unintentional contamination of food sources. Given the increasing incidence of food-related diseases throughout the world, the market potential for the Lynntech ALARM system is significant.

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