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News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Lyncean Technologies, Inc., manufacturer of the Lyncean Compact Light Source, today announced the successful raising of $650,000 in a Series A funding round. The funding will be used to further grow commercial activity in the academic research market and the exploration of vertical market opportunities in the semiconductor and healthcare fields. "Our recent sales and marketing efforts have validated our belief that world-class researchers value the ability to conduct synchrotron quality experiments in their own laboratory and we need to be ready to support the expected business operationally," said Lyncean CEO Dr. Michael Feser. "Having the additional financial support will also help us begin to execute our vision of expanding into one of several potential vertical markets." "X-ray based technologies are playing a growing role not only in scientific applications but also in industrial and medical applications. We see tremendous opportunity for the Lyncean Compact Light Source to enable more important, high-value solutions for industry." said Lucian Wagner, General Partner at EuroUS Ventures, who coordinated and led the group of participating investors. Lyncean Technologies, Inc. is located in Fremont, California and was founded in 2001 to develop the Compact Light Source (CLS), a miniature synchrotron x-ray source based on research performed at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University. Unlike stadium-sized synchrotron radiation sources that require a highly technical support staff, the CLS fits in a typical laboratory space and is designed to be operated directly by academic or industrial end-users. By replacing the conventional "undulator" magnets found in the large synchrotrons by laser technology, the entire device scales down in size by a factor of 200. Unlike traditional laboratory sources, the CLS makes a narrow beam of nearly monochromatic X-rays which are adjustable in energy. The first commercial Lyncean CLS was purchased in December 2012 by researchers from the newly formed Center for Advanced Laser Applications in Germany, a joint project of the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich and the Technical University Munich (TUM). The Munich CLS was delivered at the end of 2014 and has been in routine operation since April 2015. For more information visit: http://www.


Fu J.,Beihang University | Schleede S.,TU Munich | Tan R.,Beihang University | Chen L.,Beihang University | And 8 more authors.
Zeitschrift fur Medizinische Physik | Year: 2013

Iterative reconstruction has a wide spectrum of proven advantages in the field of conventional X-ray absorption-based computed tomography (CT). In this paper, we report on an algebraic iterative reconstruction technique for grating-based differential phase-contrast CT (DPC-CT). Due to the differential nature of DPC-CT projections, a differential operator and a smoothing operator are added to the iterative reconstruction, compared to the one commonly used for absorption-based CT data. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured at a two-grating interferometer setup. Since the algorithm is easy to implement and allows for the extension to various regularization possibilities, we expect a significant impact of the method for improving future medical and industrial DPC-CT applications. © 2012.


Schleede S.,TU Munich | Bech M.,TU Munich | Bech M.,Lund University | Achterhold K.,TU Munich | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Synchrotron Radiation | Year: 2012

The Compact Light Source is a miniature synchrotron producing X-rays at the interaction point of a counter-propagating laser pulse and electron bunch through the process of inverse Compton scattering. The small transverse size of the luminous region yields a highly coherent beam with an angular divergence of a few milliradians. The intrinsic monochromaticity and coherence of the produced X-rays can be exploited in high-sensitivity differential phase-contrast imaging with a grating-based interferometer. Here, the first multimodal X-ray imaging experiments at the Compact Light Source at a clinically compatible X-ray energy of 21 keV are reported. Dose-compatible measurements of a mammography phantom clearly demonstrate an increase in contrast attainable through differential phase and dark-field imaging over conventional attenuation-based projections. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography.


Eggl E.,TU Munich | Schleede S.,TU Munich | Bech M.,TU Munich | Bech M.,Lund University | And 4 more authors.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | Year: 2015

Between X-ray tubes and large-scale synchrotron sources, a large gap in performance exists with respect to the monochromaticity and brilliance of the X-ray beam. However, due to their size and cost, large-scale synchrotrons are not available for more routine applications in small and medium-sized academic or industrial laboratories. This gap could be closed by laser-driven compact synchrotron light sources (CLS), which use an infrared (IR) laser cavity in combination with a small electron storage ring. Hard X-rays are produced through the process of inverse Compton scattering upon the intersection of the electron bunch with the focused laser beam. The produced X-ray beam is intrinsically monochromatic and highly collimated. This makes a CLS well-suited for applications of more advanced - and more challenging - X-ray imaging approaches, such as X-ray multimodal tomography. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first results of a first successful demonstration experiment in which a monochromatic X-ray beam from a CLS was used for multimodal, i.e., phase-, dark-field, and attenuation-contrast, X-ray tomography. We show results from a fluid phantom with different liquids and a biomedical application example in the form of a multimodal CT scan of a small animal (mouse, ex vivo). The results highlight particularly that quantitative multimodal CT has become feasible with laser-driven CLS, and that the results outperform more conventional approaches. © 2015, National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.


Meinel F.G.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Schwab F.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Schleede S.,TU Munich | Bech M.,TU Munich | And 15 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Purpose: To assess whether grating-based X-ray dark-field imaging can increase the sensitivity of X-ray projection images in the diagnosis of pulmonary emphysema and allow for a more accurate assessment of emphysema distribution. Materials and Methods: Lungs from three mice with pulmonary emphysema and three healthy mice were imaged ex vivo using a laser-driven compact synchrotron X-ray source. Median signal intensities of transmission (T), dark-field (V) and a combined parameter (normalized scatter) were compared between emphysema and control group. To determine the diagnostic value of each parameter in differentiating between healthy and emphysematous lung tissue, a receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed both on a per-pixel and a per-individual basis. Parametric maps of emphysema distribution were generated using transmission, dark-field and normalized scatter signal and correlated with histopathology. Results: Transmission values relative to water were higher for emphysematous lungs than for control lungs (1.11 vs. 1.06, p<0.001). There was no difference in median dark-field signal intensities between both groups (0.66 vs. 0.66). Median normalized scatter was significantly lower in the emphysematous lungs compared to controls (4.9 vs. 10.8, p<0.001), and was the best parameter for differentiation of healthy vs. emphysematous lung tissue. In a per-pixel analysis, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) for the normalized scatter value was significantly higher than for transmission (0.86 vs. 0.78, p<0.001) and dark-field value (0.86 vs. 0.52, p<0.001) alone. Normalized scatter showed very high sensitivity for a wide range of specificity values (94% sensitivity at 75% specificity). Using the normalized scatter signal to display the regional distribution of emphysema provides color-coded parametric maps, which show the best correlation with histopathology. Conclusion: In a murine model, the complementary information provided by X-ray transmission and dark-field images adds incremental diagnostic value in detecting pulmonary emphysema and visualizing its regional distribution as compared to conventional X-ray projections. © 2013 Meinel et al.


The manufactured structure is illuminated with an x-ray beam. The manufactured structure is positioned at a selected grazing angle and a selected rotation angle with respect to the x-ray beam. The selected rotation angle has been selected to enhance in-plane diffraction of reflections of the x-ray beam by the manufactured structure. A grazing in-plane diffraction beam produced by interference with the periodic feature is detected. A property of the grazing in-plane diffraction beam is determined by the critical dimension.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 1000.00K | Year: 2013

We propose to collaborate with the SLAC National Laboratory to understand and improve the operation of our low-energy (10s of MeV) electron storage ring. The development of this technology will directly contribute to enhanced performance of a new type of x-ray source which is a spin-off of accelerator research and is now a commercial product. There is an increasing world-wide interest in compact light sources based on Inverse Compton Scattering. Development of these types of light sources includes leveraging the investment in accelerator technology first developed at DOE National Laboratories. Although these types of light sources cannot replace the larger user-supported synchrotron facilities, they offer attractive alternatives for many x-ray science applications. Fundamental research at the SLAC National Laboratory in the 1990s led to the idea of using laser-electron storage rings as a mechanism to generate x-rays with many properties of the larger synchrotron light facilities. This research led to a commercial spin-off of this technology. The SBIR project goal is to understand and improve the performance of the electron storage ring system of the commercially available Compact Light Source. The knowledge gained from studying a low-energy electron storage ring may also benefit other Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) source development. Better electron storage ring performance is one of the key technologies necessary to extend the utility and breadth of applications of the CLS or related ICS sources. This grant includes a subcontract with SLAC for technical personnel and resources for modeling, feedback development, and related accelerator physics studies.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 189.38K | Year: 2014

7. Project Summary/Abstract We propose to develop a Biological Small-angle X-ray Scattering (BioSAXS) station for the Compact Light Source, a powerful new generation of X-ray sources, which will enable biologists and biochemists to pursue state-of-the-artresearch in macromolecular structure studies in their own laboratories. The frontier of structural biology is the determination of large macromolecular complexes-the machines that drive the workings of the cell. X-ray crystallography is the method of choice for revealing the structures of these complexes, and has had important successes. However, since many complexes have proven to be difficult or impossible to crystallize, alternative methods are required. Lower resolution methods like SAXS can provide overall shape information of the complex that can be used, together with known substructures, for modeling its architecture. The advent of synchrotron sources together with advanced computing has led to a renaissance for SAXS as a complementary technique to


PubMed | TU Munich, Lund University, Lyncean Technologies, Inc. and SLAC
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | Year: 2015

Between X-ray tubes and large-scale synchrotron sources, a large gap in performance exists with respect to the monochromaticity and brilliance of the X-ray beam. However, due to their size and cost, large-scale synchrotrons are not available for more routine applications in small and medium-sized academic or industrial laboratories. This gap could be closed by laser-driven compact synchrotron light sources (CLS), which use an infrared (IR) laser cavity in combination with a small electron storage ring. Hard X-rays are produced through the process of inverse Compton scattering upon the intersection of the electron bunch with the focused laser beam. The produced X-ray beam is intrinsically monochromatic and highly collimated. This makes a CLS well-suited for applications of more advanced--and more challenging--X-ray imaging approaches, such as X-ray multimodal tomography. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first results of a first successful demonstration experiment in which a monochromatic X-ray beam from a CLS was used for multimodal, i.e., phase-, dark-field, and attenuation-contrast, X-ray tomography. We show results from a fluid phantom with different liquids and a biomedical application example in the form of a multimodal CT scan of a small animal (mouse, ex vivo). The results highlight particularly that quantitative multimodal CT has become feasible with laser-driven CLS, and that the results outperform more conventional approaches.

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