Lupane, Zimbabwe
Lupane, Zimbabwe

Lupane State University was established in 2005 in Lupane Zimbabwe. Wikipedia.


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Ndagurwa H.G.T.,National University of Science and Technology | Dube J.S.,Lupane State University | Mlambo D.,Border Timbers Ltd Mutare Zimbabwe
Austral Ecology | Year: 2014

Nutrient loss from litter plays an essential role in carbon and nutrient cycling in nutrient-constrained environments. However, the decomposition and nutrient dynamics of nutrient-rich mistletoe litter remains unknown in semi-arid savanna where productivity is nutrient limited. We studied the decomposition and nutrient dynamics (nitrogen: N, phosphorous; P, carbon: C) of litter of three mistletoe species, Erianthemum ngamicum, Plicosepalus kalachariensis, and Viscum verrucosum and N-fixing Acacia karroo using the litter-bag method in a semi-arid savanna, southwest Zimbabwe. The temporal dynamics of the soil moisture content, microbial populations, and termite activity during decomposition were also assessed. Decay rates were slower for A. karroo litter (k=0.63), but faster for the high quality mistletoe litters (mean k-value=0.79), which supports the premise that mistletoes can substantially influence nutrient availability to other plants. Nitrogen loss was between 1.3 and 3 times greater in E. ngamicum litter than in the other species. The litter of the mistletoes also lost C and P faster than A. karroo litter. However, soil moisture content and bacterial and fungal colony numbers changed in an opposite direction to changes in the decomposition rate. Additionally, there was little evidence of termite activity during the decay of all the species litters. This suggests that other factors such as photodegradation could be important in litter decomposition in semi-arid savanna. In conclusion, the higher rate of decay and nutrient release of mistletoe than A. karroo litter indicate that mistletoes play an important role in carbon and nutrient fluxes in semi-arid savanna. © 2014 Ecological Society of Australia.


Ndagurwa H.G.T.,National University of Science and Technology | Mundy P.J.,National University of Science and Technology | Dube J.S.,Lupane State University | Mlambo D.,Border Timbers Ltd
Journal of Tropical Ecology | Year: 2012

In a range of systems, studies on mistletoe distribution on the host plant have documented a number of factors that affect their occurrence and spread (Aukema & Martinez del Rio 2002a, Bowie & Ward 2004, Overton 1996, Reid et al. 1995). These patterns can be determined by host specificity, environmental conditions, host plant characteristics (Martinez del Rio et al. 1995) and the movement patterns of dispersal agents (Aukema & Martinez del Rio 2002a, 2002b). In mistletoe plants, host choice can be considerably influenced by the advantages of interacting with relatively abundant hosts (Norton & Carpenter 1998, Norton & De Lange 1999). Besides the relative abundance of host species, characteristics such as branch size, age and height can have a strong effect on mistletoe attachment resulting in size-related mistletoe infection patterns (Overton 1994). Generally positive relationships between mistletoe infection and host size have been demonstrated worldwide (Donohue 1995, Martinez del Rio et al. 1996, Norton et al. 1997, Reid & Stafford Smith 2000) and they have been interpreted in terms of the preferences by dispersing birds to perch and feed in taller trees (Aukema & Martinez del Rio 2002a) and trees accumulating infections as they age (Overton 1994). Aukema & Martinez del Rio (2002a) reported more frequent perching in taller-than-average trees by the phainopepla (Phainopepla nitens), which is the principal disperser of the desert mistletoe Phoradendron californicum. Thus, visits by mistletoe-seed-dispersing birds, and therefore mistletoe seeds received, tend to increase with tree height (Aukema & Martinez del Rio 2002a). Using a simple metapopulation model, Overton (1994) predicted the frequency of parasitized trees to increase with host age. Therefore, assuming that size is a good proxy for age, large trees are likely to be more infected than smaller trees. Reid & Stafford Smith (2000), using experimentally disinfected trees, found that larger trees were disproportionately re-infected with mistletoes. This size-intensity relationship may be used to describe mistletoe infection patterns. However, several previous studies have shown size-intensity relationships to be weak (Aukema & Martinez del Rio 2002a, Donohue 1995, Overton 1994, Reid & Stafford Smith 2000). This indicates that other factors may be important in determining mistletoe infection intensity, including that already parasitized hosts of a specific height are more likely to receive seeds than non-parasitized hosts of the same height or dispersers are likely to be attracted to trees for reasons other than size (Aukema & Martinez del Rio 2002a). © 2012 Cambridge University Press.


Ndagurwa H.G.T.,National University of Science and Technology | Dube J.S.,Lupane State University | Mlambo D.,Border Timbers Ltd
Plant Ecology | Year: 2014

Parasitic plants are increasingly becoming the focus of research in many ecosystems. They have been shown to alter litterfall properties and decomposition rates in environments where they occur. Despite this recognition, the role of mistletoes in nutrient cycling in semi-arid savanna remains poorly understood. We investigated the litter input, element returns, and associated below-canopy soil nutrient concentrations of three mistletoe species (Erianthemum ngamicum, Plicosepalus kalachariensis, and Viscum verrucosum) that parasitize Acacia karroo trees in a semi-arid savanna, southwest Zimbabwe. Element concentrations in mistletoe leaf litter were enriched relative to the host. Litterfall from mistletoes significantly increased overall litterfall by up to 173 %, with E. ngamicum and P. kalachariensis having greater litterfall than their host trees. Associated with these changes in litterfall was an increase in element returns and the below-canopy soil nutrient concentrations. The increase in nutrient returns was due to both the effect of enriched mistletoe litter and increased volumes of litterfall beneath host trees. Litterfall, element returns, and the below-canopy soil nutrient concentrations were significantly influenced by mistletoe density, with higher values at high mistletoe density. Overall, E. ngamicum and P. kalachariensis had greater influence on litterfall, element returns, and soil nutrient concentrations than V. verrucosum. These findings are consistent with current understanding of enhanced nutrient cycling in the presence of parasitic plants particularly in nutrient-poor ecosystems. We conclude that the introduction of nutrients and associated increase in resource heterogeneity play an important role in determining ecosystem structure and function in semi-arid savannas. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Ndagurwa H.G.T.,National University of Science and Technology | Dube J.S.,Lupane State University | Mlambo D.,Border Timbers Ltd | Mawanza M.,National University of Science and Technology
Plant and Soil | Year: 2014

Aims: The below-canopy soil moisture content and litter-layer arthropod abundance and diversity of Acacia karroo trees parasitized by each of three mistletoe species (Erianthemum ngamicum, Plicosepalus kalachariensis, and Viscum verrucosum) and uninfected A. karroo trees were investigated in semi-arid savanna, southwest Zimbabwe.Results: The soils below the canopies of mistletoe-infected trees were significantly low in moisture content compared to those beneath uninfected A. karroo trees. Nevertheless, arthropod species diversity was greater by up to 34 % below the canopies of mistletoe-infected trees than beneath uninfected A. karroo trees, with greater abundances beneath trees infected by E. ngamicum and P. kalachariensis. In addition, the majority of the arthropod species associated with mistletoe-infected trees had litter as their dominant foraging substrate.Conclusions: Our findings show that mistletoes increase the abundance and diversity of litter-dwelling and –foraging arthropods due to increase in the quality and quantity of litterfall beneath mistletoe-infected trees. By altering the below-canopy arthropod communities and soil moisture content, mistletoes have potential to modify ecosystem processes such as decomposition, soil process rates, and nutrient cycling. Therefore, we suggest that the resulting increase in resource heterogeneity plays an important role in determining the structure and functioning of semi-arid savanna ecosystems. © 2014, Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


Ndagurwa H.G.T.,National University of Science and Technology | Dube J.S.,Lupane State University | Mlambo D.,Border Timbers Ltd
Journal of Tropical Ecology | Year: 2013

This study investigated the effects of mistletoe infection on N cycling in a semi-arid savanna, south-west Zimbabwe. We established five plots (10 × 10 m) which each included three large canopy-dominant Acacia karroo trees infected by one of three mistletoes (Erianthemum ngamicum, Plicosepalus kalachariensis and Viscum verrucosum) and non-infected A. karroo trees. In each plot, we measured litterfall, litter quality (N, phenolics, tannins and lignin), soil nutrient concentrations and N transformations beneath tree canopies. Soil N, P and Ca were greatest beneath trees infected by P. kalachariensis than beneath non-infected trees. Litterfall and litter N returns were 1.5, 2 and 1.4 times more beneath A. karroo trees infected by E. ngamicum, P. kalachariensis and V. verrucosum, respectively. Mineral N increased with mistletoe infection but did not exceed 20%. Soil N transformations were greater beneath trees infected by E. ngamicum (> 40%), and lower beneath trees infected by P. kalachariensis (<50%) and V. verrucosum (<48%) than beneath non-infected A. karroo trees. Soil N transformations were negatively correlated with condensed tannins, lignin and lignin : N. We conclude that the improved N concentration can increase resource heterogeneity, which may alter the ecosystem structure and functioning in the semi-arid savanna. Copyright © 2013 Cambridge University Press.


Sebata A.,National University of Science and Technology | Ndlovu L.R.,National University of Science and Technology | Dube J.S.,Lupane State University
Animal Feed Science and Technology | Year: 2011

The chemical composition, in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) and in vitro gas production (IVGP) of five woody species: Commiphora pyracanthoides, Terminalia prunioides, Acacia tortilis, Faidherbia albida and Dichrostachys cinerea browsed by Matebele goats in an open semi-arid savanna was determined at three leaf phenophases. T. prunioides had the highest IVGP volume (80.1ml) and C. pyracanthoides the highest IVDMD (0.60) with D. cinerea having both the lowest IVDMD (0.39) and IVGP volume (43.7ml). This was presumably due to the high condensed tannins (CT) in D. cinerea (20.1 A550nm) as compared to the low CT in T. prunioides (1.2 A550nm) and C. pyracanthoides (2.9 A550nm). T. prunioides had lower acid (240.6 vs. 354.4g/kg DM) and neutral (351.2 vs. 430.5g/kg DM) detergent fibre than C. pyracanthoides. Crude protein (CP) and IVDMD declined while neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and acid detergent fibre (ADF) increased with leaf maturity. In vitro dry matter digestibility was not influenced by CP (r=0.09, P>0.05) and NDF (r=-0.29, P>0.05) while ADF negatively affected IVGP (r=-0.54, P<0.05). Gas production was positively associated with IVDMD (r=0.54, P<0.05). Condensed tannins had a greater negative effect on IVDMD (r=-0.58, P<0.05) and IVGP (-0.68, P<0.01) than acid (r=-0.46, P>0.05; r=-0.54, P<0.05) and neutral (r=-0.29, P>0.05; r=-0.51, P>0.05) detergent fibre. Total phenolics were positively correlated to IVGP (r=0.73, P>0.05). We conclude that T. prunioides had good rumen fermentation attributes due to low NDF, ADF and CT contents. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Ndagurwa H.G.T.,National University of Science and Technology | Dube J.S.,Lupane State University
Animal Feed Science and Technology | Year: 2013

The potential and effective rumen digestion of three mistletoe species (Erianthemum ngamicum, Plicosepalus kalachariensis and Viscum verrucosum) and four acacia species (Acacia gerrardii, Acacia karroo, Acacia nilotica and Acacia robusta) browsed by goats in the semi-arid savanna in Zimbabwe was determined in vitro with or without including polyethylene glycol (PEG). The in vitro gas production (IVGP) (74.6 vs. 63.1. ml), gas production rate (0.05/h vs. 0.035/h) and effective degradability (46.7 vs. 35.3. ml) were higher in mistletoe than acacia (P<0.01). For mistletoe species, P. kalachariensis had the highest IVGP, potential gas production (b), gas production rate (c) and effective degradability (ED) than E. ngamicum and V. verrucosum (P<0.01). In acacia species, IVGP and potential gas production (b) were higher in A. karroo whilst A. gerrardii had the greatest gas production rate (c) than the other acacia species. In all browse species, addition of PEG, which minimised the inhibitory effects of tannin on microbial fermentation, resulted in an increase in gas production parameters except in P. kalachariensis (P<0.01). The effect of PEG on fermentation and degradability was greater in acacia foliage than in mistletoe foliage (IVGP, 19 vs. 41%; potential gas production, 11 vs. 16%; effective degradability, 13 vs. 42%), which suggested that the tannin in acacia was more biologically active than that in mistletoe. In both mistletoe and acacia species, there was an interaction between species and PEG for IVGP and effective degradability. This result suggested that the effects of PEG on fermentation parameters were species-specific as species responded differently to the addition of PEG. The increase in fermentation parameters due to the addition of PEG varied widely amongst the acacia species (range: 10-114%) and mistletoe species (range: 7-49%). Thus, the inclusion of PEG to neutralise or reduce the effects of tannins should consider the species were its use would be more beneficial, such as in A. gerrardii, A. robusta, and E. ngamicum in this study. In conclusion, mistletoe species show a high nutritive value with large potential for feeding goats in the semi-arid savanna due to the higher values of IVGP, gas production rate, potential gas production, and effective degradation than those for acacia species. In addition, our results support the use of PEG to neutralise tannins in tannin-rich forages. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Ndagurwa H.G.T.,National University of Science and Technology | Dube J.S.,Lupane State University
Livestock Science | Year: 2013

The study examined the nutritive value of three mistletoe species (Erianthemum ngamicum, Plicosepalus kalachariensis and Viscum verrucosum) and four Acacia species (Acacia gerrardii, Acacia karroo, Acacia nilotica and Acacia robusta) browsed by goats in the semi-arid savanna in Zimbabwe. All were analysed for crude protein (CP), acid detergent fibre (ADF), neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent lignin (ADL), total phenolics (TP), condensed tannin (CT) and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD). In vitro gas production (IVGP) was measured with and without the addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG). In vitro metabolizable energy (IVME) was estimated from CP and IVGP. Acacia foliage contained more CP (120.9 vs. 109.5. g/kg DM) and ADF (219.1 vs.161.1. g/kg DM) content than mistletoe foliage. However, the content of ADL, TP, CT and IVDMD did not differ (P>0.05) between the two plant groups. In vitro dry matter digestibility differed significantly (P< 0.01) among species within both mistletoe and acacia foliage, and the differences reflected variation in their chemical composition. The IVDMD for E. ngamicum, P. kalachariensis and V. verrucosum was 563.3, 537.3, and 339.2. g/kg DM, respectively. In acacia species, the respective IVDMD for A. gerrardii, A. karroo, A. nilotica, and A. robusta was 604.2, 317.7, 509.1, and 479.6. g/kg DM. Mistletoe foliage had higher in vitro ruminal fermentation parameters (i.e., IVGP and IVME) than acacia foliage. The IVGP without and with the addition of PEG was 62.2 and 68.5. ml/300. mg DM and 32.9 and 54.1. ml/300. mg DM in mistletoe and acacia foliage, respectively. The respective IVME in mistletoe foliage was 16.9 and 17.8. MJ/kg DM and in acacia foliage, 13.6 and 16.4. MJ/kg DM. The inclusion of PEG in the fermentation experiment increased IVGP and IVME in all acacia species and two mistletoe species (E. ngamicum and V. verrucosum). However, in P. kalachariensis inclusion of PEG caused a significant reduction in IVGP (-15.6%, P<0.001) and IVME (-9%, P<0.001). Overall, the inclusion of PEG caused a greater change in IVGP (64.4 vs. 10.1%), and IVME (20.6 vs. 5.3%) in acacia foliage than in mistletoe foliage. In vitro dry matter digestibility and fermentation parameters (i.e., IVGP and IVME) had inverse relationships with ADF, ADL, CT, and TP. In conclusion, the mistletoe species were of good fermentation quality than acacia species due to low ADF content and tannin activity. In this regard, mistletoe species show potential as alternative browse for goats in the semi-arid savanna. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Gwate O.,Lupane State University
Proceedings of the IASTED African Conference on Water Resource Management, AfricaWRM 2012 | Year: 2012

The present study sought to determine the appropriateness of conventional water supply technologies (boreholes/deep wells) by determining the presence and functionality of existing drinking water sources in Gwanda district, Zimbabwe. Research methodology entailed the land systems approach. A total of five wards representing all environmental gradients in the district were selected and a household questionnaire was administered and five focus group discussions were also done in the five wards. Quantitative data from the questionnaire was analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS).


PubMed | Lupane State University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Tropical animal health and production | Year: 2015

Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fatal viral disease of cattle prevalent in farms bordering wildlife conservancies and national parks where cattle and wildebeests cohabit. The behaviour of the diseases and its related contribution to cattle mortalities has been poorly studied in the smallholder sector. A study was therefore conducted to established trends of occurrence and contribution to animal losses in 97 smallholder farms and eight commercial farms bordering Rhodes Matopos National Park (RMNP). A structured questionnaire and secondary records were used to gather the data in the smallholder and commercial farms, respectively. In the smallholder sector, cattle farmers from three villages were chosen as respondents in a survey to provide information on the impact and extent of losses in their cattle herds. Epidemiological data from January 2006 to April 2014 was extracted from farm records from two Matopos Research Institute farms. A seasonal pattern in MCF occurrence was observed. Most cattle mortalities were recorded during summer (February to May), with highest mortalities recorded from March to April. Sporadic cases were however recorded in October and November in year 2007, 2010, and 2012. The study further revealed that MCF caused 71 and 21% of cattle mortalities in the commercial and smallholder sector, respectively. Deferred grazing of wildebeest hotspots by restriction of cattle movement during summer or November to April period avoids wildebeest-cattle contact. This can alleviate cattle mortalities due to MCF.

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