Lung and Blood Institute

Beerse, Belgium

Lung and Blood Institute

Beerse, Belgium
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

MARLBOROUGH, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Sunovion) announced that multiple data analyses from two Phase 3 studies demonstrating that Utibron™ Neohaler® (indacaterol/glycopyrrolate) inhalation powder improved lung function, health-related quality of life (HRQL), dyspnea and night-time symptoms compared to placebo in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), were presented at the 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference (ATS 2017) held May 19-24, 2017, in Washington, D.C. Findings from the FLIGHT1 and FLIGHT2 pivotal efficacy and safety studies, as well as from the FLIGHT3 long-term safety study, were included in nine posters for UTIBRON NEOHALER presented at the meeting. UTIBRON NEOHALER is a twice-daily combination long-acting beta agonist (indacaterol) and long-acting muscarinic antagonist (glycopyrrolate) (LABA/LAMA) for the long-term maintenance treatment of airflow obstruction in people with COPD, including chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema. UTIBRON NEOHALER is not indicated to treat asthma or for the relief of sudden symptoms of COPD. “Improvement in health related quality of life, including reduction of difficult or labored breathing, is a key therapeutic goal for patients with COPD that is reflected in the updated 2017 Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) report,” said lead investigator of FLIGHT1 and FLIGHT2 studies Donald A. Mahler, M.D., Emeritus Professor of Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, N.H. “These UTIBRON NEOHALER data show that the dual bronchodilator significantly improves and sustains bronchodilation and may improve health status and COPD symptoms in moderate-to-severe patients.” “UTIBRON NEOHALER has demonstrated the value of dual bronchodilation treatment for people living with COPD,” said Thomas H. Goodin, Ph.D., Senior Director, Clinical Development at Sunovion. “The data presented at ATS indicate that UTIBRON NEOHALER was associated with statistically significant and clinically important improvements in lung function as well as a reduction in the number of sleep disturbances and in the use of rescue medication, which may have a positive impact on patients’ quality of life.” About COPD Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, preventable and treatable disease that is characterized by persistent respiratory symptoms and airflow limitation that is due to airway and/or lung abnormalities usually caused by significant exposure to toxic particles or gases. The main risk factor for COPD is tobacco smoking, but other environmental exposures may contribute.1 Approximately 15.7 million adults in the U.S. report that they have been diagnosed with COPD.2 It is estimated that several million more adults have undiagnosed COPD.3 COPD is responsible for over 120,000 deaths per year, making it the third leading cause of death in the U.S.2 COPD develops slowly and the symptoms often worsen over time, potentially limiting the ability to perform routine activities.2 Symptoms of COPD include coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, excess production of mucus in the lungs, the inability to breathe deeply and the feeling of being unable to breathe.4 The symptoms of COPD can be most severe during the night and early morning.5 Morning symptoms can be associated with limitation of activities during the day, impaired health status and increased risk of exacerbation.6 Night-time symptoms disturb sleep, reduce sleep quality and, in the long term, may be associated with development or worsening of cardiovascular diseases, cognition, depression and increased mortality.7 About FLIGHT1 and FLIGHT2 Studies8 FLIGHT1 and FLIGHT2 were Phase 3, replicate, multicenter, double-blind, parallel group, placebo- and active-controlled studies that randomized (1:1:1:1) patients with moderate-to-severe COPD to receive indacaterol/glycopyrrolate 27.5/15.6 mcg, indacaterol 27.5 mcg, glycopyrrolate 15.6 mcg or placebo (all given twice daily) over a 12-week treatment period. All treatments were delivered via the Neohaler® device. The studies were funded by Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. About Utibron™ Neohaler® (indacaterol/glycopyrrolate) Inhalation Powder9 UTIBRON NEOHALER (indacaterol/glycopyrrolate) inhalation powder is a combination bronchodilator indicated for the long-term maintenance treatment of airflow obstruction in patients with COPD, including chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema. It is not indicated to treat acute deteriorations of COPD or to treat asthma. UTIBRON NEOHALER combines two medicines in one twice-daily fixed-dose combination: indacaterol 27.5 mcg, a long-acting beta -adrenergic agonist (LABA), and the long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) glycopyrrolate 15.6 mcg. Sunovion entered into an exclusive license agreement with Novartis for the U.S. commercialization rights to UTIBRON NEOHALER, as well as Seebri™ Neohaler® (glycopyrrolate) inhalation solution and Arcapta® Neohaler® (indacaterol) inhalation solution, on December 21, 2016. Novartis received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for UTIBRON NEOHALER in October 2015. UTIBRON™ NEOHALER® (indacaterol and glycopyrrolate) is a combination of a long-acting beta -agonist, or LABA, medicine (indacaterol) and an anticholinergic medicine (glycopyrrolate). UTIBRON NEOHALER is used long term, twice each day (morning and evening), to treat the symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema. UTIBRON NEOHALER has been approved for COPD only and is NOT indicated for the treatment of asthma. People with asthma who take long-acting beta -adrenergic agonist (LABA) medicines, such as indacaterol (one of the medicines in UTIBRON NEOHALER), have an increased risk of death from asthma problems. It is not known if LABA medicines, such as indacaterol, increase the risk of death in people with COPD. UTIBRON NEOHALER does not relieve sudden symptoms of COPD and should not be used more than twice daily. Always have a short-acting beta -agonist with you to treat sudden symptoms. Use UTIBRON NEOHALER exactly as your health care provider tells you to use it. Do not use UTIBRON NEOHALER more often than it is prescribed for you. Get emergency medical care if your breathing problems worsen quickly, you need to use your rescue medication more often than usual, or your rescue medication does not work as well to relieve your symptoms. Do not use UTIBRON NEOHALER if you are allergic to indacaterol, glycopyrrolate, or any of the ingredients in UTIBRON NEOHALER. Ask your health care provider if you are not sure. Tell your health care provider about all of your health conditions, including if you: Tell your health care provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription medicines, over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. UTIBRON NEOHALER and certain other medicines may interact with each other. This may cause serious side effects. Especially tell your health care provider if you take: UTIBRON NEOHALER can cause serious side effects, including: Common side effects of UTIBRON NEOHALER include sore throat and runny nose, high blood pressure, and back pain. These are not all of the possible side effects with UTIBRON NEOHALER. Tell your health care provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. Do not swallow UTIBRON capsules. UTIBRON capsules are for inhalation only with the NEOHALER device. Never place a capsule in the mouthpiece of the NEOHALER device. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. This information is not comprehensive. How to get more information: For additional information, please see full Prescribing Information, including BOXED WARNING and Medication Guide, for UTIBRON NEOHALER, or visit www.UTIBRON.com. Expanding Sunovion’s Heritage in COPD Sunovion is committed to expanding its heritage of advancing new treatments for serious respiratory medical conditions, including the 15.7 million people in the U.S. who are living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).2 The company offers the broadest COPD portfolio in the U.S., providing treatment options for people at various stages of COPD, as well as the flexibility to choose handheld or nebulized delivery based on individual needs. Sunovion goes beyond treatment offerings to support awareness and understanding with the entire COPD community – health care providers, patients and caregivers – and to advancing disease state education through its partnerships with various organizations. About Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Sunovion) Sunovion is a global biopharmaceutical company focused on the innovative application of science and medicine to help people with serious medical conditions. Sunovion’s vision is to lead the way to a healthier world. The company’s spirit of innovation is driven by the conviction that scientific excellence paired with meaningful advocacy and relevant education can improve lives. With patients at the center of everything it does, Sunovion has charted new paths to life-transforming treatments that reflect ongoing investments in research and development and an unwavering commitment to support people with psychiatric, neurological and respiratory conditions. Sunovion’s track record of discovery, development and commercialization of important therapies has included Utibron™ Neohaler® (indacaterol/glycopyrrolate) inhalation powder, Brovana® (arformoterol tartrate) inhalation solution, Latuda® (lurasidone HCI) and Aptiom® (eslicarbazepine acetate). Headquartered in Marlborough, Mass., Sunovion is an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Europe Ltd., based in London, England, Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc., based in Mississauga, Ontario, and Sunovion CNS Development Canada ULC, based in Toronto, Ontario, are wholly-owned direct subsidiaries of Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. Additional information can be found on the company’s web sites: www.sunovion.com, www.sunovion.eu and www.sunovion.ca. Connect with Sunovion on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook and YouTube. About Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma is among the top-ten listed pharmaceutical companies in Japan operating globally in major pharmaceutical markets, including Japan, the United States, China and the European Union. Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma aims to create innovative pharmaceutical products in the Psychiatry & Neurology area and the Oncology area, which have been designated as the focus therapeutic areas. Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma is based on the merger in 2005 between Dainippon Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., and Sumitomo Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd. Today, Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma has about 6,500 employees worldwide. Additional information about Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma is available through its corporate website at www.ds-pharma.com. LATUDA and SUNOVION are registered trademarks of Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. BROVANA is a registered trademark of Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. APTIOM is used under license from Bial. ARCAPTA and NEOHALER are registered trademarks of Novartis AG, used under license.  SEEBRI and UTIBRON are trademarks of Novartis AG, used under license. Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. is a U.S. subsidiary of Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. For a copy of this release, visit Sunovion’s web site at www.sunovion.com 1 GOLD Guidelines 2017. http://www.goldcopd.org/guidelines-global-strategy-for-diagnosis-management.html. Accessed: March 16, 2017. 2 MMWR: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Employment and Activity Limitations Among Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease — United States, 2013. March 27, 2015; 64(11). Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/ 3 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. “What is COPD?” Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/copd/what-is-copd/index.htm. Accessed: March 2, 2016 4 National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. (2013). What Are the Signs and Symptoms of COPD? Retrieved from https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/copd/signs. 5 Partridge MR, Karlsson N, Small IR. Patient insight into the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the morning: an internet survey. Curr Med Res Opin. 2009;25:2043–8. 6 Roche N, Small M, Broomfield S, Higgins V, Pollard R. Real world COPD: association of morning symptoms with clinical and patient reported outcomes. COPD. 2013;10:679–86. 7 Agusti A, Hedner J, Marin JM, Barbé F, Cazzola M, Rennard S. Night-time symptoms: a forgotten dimension of COPD. Eur Respir Rev. 2011;20:183–94. 8 Mahler DA, Kerwin E, Ayers T, et al. FLIGHT1 and FLIGHT2: Efficacy and Safety of QVA149 (Indacaterol/Glycoprrolate) versus its Monocomponents and Placebo and Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2015;192(9):1068-1079. 9 Utibron™ Neohaler® Full Prescribing Information. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. January 2017.


The annual American Thoracic Society International Conference wrapped up this week. Here's a look at some of the newest research and stories from this year's conference ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Thousands of critical care and pulmonology specialists from across the world gathered this week for the American Thoracic Society International Conference in Washington, D.C., to share research, medical developments and best practices for patient care. Here, we highlight a few standouts. The value of rapid sepsis treatment Published in The New England Journal of Medicine this week, the study looks at the controversy surrounding how quickly sepsis must be treated. Using data from 185 hospitals on patients with sepsis and septic shock, researchers found that faster administration of care was linked with lower mortality. The study team included Michigan Medicine researchers and University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovatio members Hallie Prescott, M.D., assistant professor of internal medicine, and Theodore Iwashyna, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of internal medicine. Both time to antibiotics and time to "three-hour bundle" completion were associated with lower risk-adjusted mortality. For every additional hour of delay in these treatments, odds of mortality increased by 4 percent. "This is the largest study to date looking at time to antibiotics in sepsis treatment," Prescott says. "It was made possible as a result of patient-level data collected in New York as part of new statewide sepsis regulations, known as Rory's Regulations." These regulations were put in place after 12-year-old Rory Staunton died in 2012 of unrecognized sepsis. The regulations require hospitals to develop and implement protocols for sepsis recognition and treatment, as well as to report data on all patients recognized to have sepsis starting in 2014. The core elements in the sepsis protocols were the delivery of antibiotics, measurement of lactate and collection of blood cultures within three hours of patients arriving. These three treatments are known as the three-hour bundle. The study tested whether earlier treatment was associated with better outcomes among patients who presented to an emergency department and were treated within 12 hours. "We found that we can reduce avoidable deaths by treating patients with sepsis and septic shock more quickly upon their arrival to the emergency department," Prescott says. "These findings argue that hospitals and health care systems should invest in infrastructure to get antibiotics to patients as soon as possible -- just as we get patients with heart attacks to the catheterization lab as soon as possible. With each hour of delay, patients have a greater risk of death." Predicting mortality and functional outcomes in the ICU New research from the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, published in JAMA, analyzed how well intensive care unit physicians and nurses can predict six-month patient mortality and morbidity. The authors say care teams' predictions can influence ICU decision-making, but it is not known if these predictions are accurate. To probe the issue, the research team enrolled patients who spent at least three days in the ICU from October 2013 to May 2014 and required mechanical ventilation, vasopressors or both. Patients were treated across five ICUs in three hospitals in Philadelphia. Of the 303 enrolled patients, 299 were tracked to a six-month follow-up. At that time, 169 were alive. Concurrently, the researchers had 47 physicians and 128 nurses predict the patients' in-hospital mortality and six-month functional outcomes, including mortality, return to original residence, ability to toilet independently, ability to climb 10 stairs independently and ability to remember most things, think clearly and solve day-to-day problems. The findings: Physicians most accurately predicted six-month mortality, while nurses most accurately predicted patients' in-hospital mortality. The physicians and nurses both least-accurately predicted cognitive recovery. Both showed higher accuracy when they were confident about their predictions. The research team notes that accuracy in predictions varied depending on the outcome and confidence of the predictor, and additional research would help in understanding prognostic estimates. At the conference, the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute released a COPD National Action Plan, emphasizing the importance of the disease. It outlines key goals, including raising public awareness of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, advancing research, improving patient care and health delivery, and developing management strategies for patients. "Most people don't realize that COPD is actually a manageable disease," said Meilan Han, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine at Michigan Medicine, medical director of the U-M Women's Respiratory Health Program and member of the stakeholder group that formulated the action plan, at the time of the plan's release. "The plan outlines the importance public awareness plays in this disease. So many people go undiagnosed, but perhaps having more education around their symptoms would prompt them to reach out to their physician for care." Some of the action plan's key goals for awareness and treatment of COPD are to: "As a researcher, physician and advocate for patients with this disease, I know I speak for myself and the committee when I say that we hope this plan helps create additional awareness for COPD and undiagnosed patients receive the care they need," Han said. "For those already diagnosed, we hope to continue to provide high-quality education and health care to help them manage this incurable disease."


ATLANTA -- Dr. Ming-Hui Zou, director of the Center for Molecular & Translational Medicine and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Molecular Medicine, has renewed a four-year, $2.3 million federal grant to study the role of an enzyme in causing diabetic vascular diseases and the molecular mechanism that leads to these diseases. This is the third competitive renewal for this grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. The diabetes-related research was initially funded in 2005. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. About 29.1 million Americans, one out of every 11 people, have diabetes, a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. Diabetes can cause serious health complications, including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure and lower-extremity amputations, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The grant will help Zou determine if adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an essential energy and redox homeostasis sensor, maintains the balance of mitochondrial fission and fusion by promoting the autophagic degradation (the natural, destructive mechanism of the cell that gets rid of unnecessary or dysfunctional components) of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1). The findings could lead to a new treatment for diabetic vascular diseases. Mitochondria are the power houses of cells, and a disruption in the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in a variety of diseases, including neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Zou's preliminary data found that inhibiting AMPK is accompanied by increases in mitochondrial fission, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. "The completion of this study will assess whether the inhibition of mitochondrial fission, a crucial step in the initiation of cardiovascular disease, can be a new strategy to protect against the development of vascular disease in diabetic patients," Zou said. The project has two aims. Zou's research team will determine the essential role of AMPK in maintaining the balance between mitochondrial fission and fusion, and they will explain the molecular mechanisms by which AMPK inhibits DRP-1-dependent mitochondrial fission in endothelial cells, which line the inner walls of blood vessels and lymphatic vessels. The studies will be conducted in mice. An abstract of the grant, 5R01HL080499-12, is available at NIH's Project RePORTer website. For more information about the Center for Molecular & Translational Medicine, visit http://medicine. .


MARLBOROUGH, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Sunovion) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a Complete Response Letter (CRL) for the New Drug Application (NDA) for SUN-101/eFlow® (glycopyrrolate) for the long-term, maintenance treatment of airflow obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema. The CRL does not require Sunovion to conduct any additional clinical studies for the approval of SUN-101/eFlow®. Sunovion will work with the FDA to determine an appropriate path forward. We are confident in SUN-101/eFlow® and are committed to bringing this innovative therapy to COPD patients in the U.S. as quickly as possible. About SUN-101/eFlow® SUN-101 (glycopyrrolate) is a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) bronchodilator delivered via the proprietary investigational eFlow® closed system nebulizer. SUN-101/eFlow® is currently in development as a nebulized treatment for patients with moderate-to-very-severe COPD. The investigational combined product, consisting of SUN-101 and the investigational eFlow® closed system nebulizer, which has been optimized for SUN-101 delivery, has not been approved by the FDA for the treatment of COPD. About COPD Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, preventable and treatable disease that is characterized by persistent respiratory symptoms and airflow limitation that is due to airway and/or lung abnormalities usually caused by significant exposure to toxic particles or gases. The main risk factor for COPD is tobacco smoking, but other environmental exposures may contribute.1 Approximately 15.7 million adults in the U.S. report that they have been diagnosed with COPD.2 It is estimated that several million more adults have undiagnosed COPD.3 COPD is responsible for over 120,000 deaths per year, making it the third leading cause of death in the U.S.2 COPD develops slowly and the symptoms often worsen over time, potentially limiting the ability to perform routine activities.2 Symptoms of COPD include coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, excess production of mucus in the lungs, the inability to breathe deeply and the feeling of being unable to breathe.4 The symptoms of COPD can be most severe during the night and early morning.5 Morning symptoms can be associated with limitation of activities during the day, impaired health status and increased risk of exacerbation.6 Night-time symptoms disturb sleep, reduce sleep quality and, in the long term, may be associated with development or worsening of cardiovascular diseases, cognition, depression and increased mortality.7 About Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Sunovion) Sunovion is a global biopharmaceutical company focused on the innovative application of science and medicine to help people with serious medical conditions. Sunovion’s vision is to lead the way to a healthier world. The company’s spirit of innovation is driven by the conviction that scientific excellence paired with meaningful advocacy and relevant education can improve lives. With patients at the center of everything it does, Sunovion has charted new paths to life-transforming treatments that reflect ongoing investments in research and development and an unwavering commitment to support people with psychiatric, neurological and respiratory conditions. Sunovion’s track record of discovery, development and commercialization of important therapies has included Utibron™ Neohaler® (indacaterol/glycopyrrolate) inhalation powder, Brovana® (arformoterol tartrate) inhalation solution, Latuda® (lurasidone HCI) and Aptiom® (eslicarbazepine acetate). Headquartered in Marlborough, Mass., Sunovion is an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Europe Ltd., based in London, England, Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc., based in Mississauga, Ontario, and Sunovion CNS Development Canada ULC, based in Toronto, Ontario, are wholly-owned direct subsidiaries of Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. Additional information can be found on the company’s web sites: www.sunovion.com, www.sunovion.eu and www.sunovion.ca. Connect with Sunovion on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook and YouTube. About Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma is among the top-ten listed pharmaceutical companies in Japan operating globally in major pharmaceutical markets, including Japan, the United States, China and the European Union. Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma aims to create innovative pharmaceutical products in the Psychiatry & Neurology area and the Oncology area, which have been designated as the focus therapeutic areas. Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma is based on the merger in 2005 between Dainippon Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., and Sumitomo Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd. Today, Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma has about 6,500 employees worldwide. Additional information about Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma is available through its corporate website at www.ds-pharma.com. LATUDA and SUNOVION are registered trademarks of Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. BROVANA is a registered trademark of Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. APTIOM is used under license from Bial. ARCAPTA and NEOHALER are registered trademarks of Novartis AG, used under license. SEEBRI and UTIBRON are trademarks of Novartis AG, used under license. eFlow® is a registered trademark of PARI Pharma GmbH. Spiriva® and HandiHaler® are registered trademarks of Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GMBH & Co KG. Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. is a U.S. subsidiary of Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. For a copy of this release, visit Sunovion’s web site at www.sunovion.com 1 GOLD Guidelines 2017. http://www.goldcopd.org/guidelines-global-strategy-for-diagnosis-management.html. Accessed: March 16, 2017. 2 MMWR: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Employment and Activity Limitations Among Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease — United States, 2013. March 27, 2015; 64(11). Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/ 3 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. “What is COPD?” Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/copd/what-is-copd/index.htm. Accessed: March 2, 2016 4 National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. (2013). What Are the Signs and Symptoms of COPD? Retrieved from https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/copd/signs. 5 Partridge MR, Karlsson N, Small IR. Patient insight into the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the morning: an internet survey. Curr Med Res Opin. 2009;25:2043–8. 6 Roche N, Small M, Broomfield S, Higgins V, Pollard R. Real world COPD: association of morning symptoms with clinical and patient reported outcomes. COPD. 2013;10:679–86. 7 Agusti A, Hedner J, Marin JM, Barbé F, Cazzola M, Rennard S. Night-time symptoms: a forgotten dimension of COPD. Eur Respir Rev. 2011;20:183–94.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

WASHINGTON, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Asthma is a chronic medical condition that affects over 20 million Americans, including 6 million children. It is a lung disorder in which the bronchioles, the inner lining of the small breathing tubes of the lungs, become inflamed and swollen. The muscles in the walls of the bronchioles may spasm, or narrow, causing symptoms of asthma which include chest tightness, wheezing, shortness of breath, or coughing. Individuals with mild asthma may not even be aware they have it, as wheezing may only be audible with a stethoscope if present at all. Rather than being a distinct clinical entity, asthma is now considered to represent overlapping syndromes with similar clinical features. Asthma may develop at any age, but most commonly occurs in early childhood, or mid-adulthood. Asthma that presents in childhood typically responds well to appropriate treatment and is often outgrown with time. Many cases that occur in adulthood respond well to treatment, but remain chronic. There is a strong genetic component to asthma, as approximately 40% of children who have asthmatic parents will develop asthma. Asthma also varies by ethnicity; for example, in 2006, asthma prevalence was found to be 20.1% higher in African Americans than in whites. Most patients with asthma, approximately 70%, have allergic disease. Most children with asthma have allergies that cause or significantly aggravate their asthma. As with many medical conditions, a combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure plays a role in the development of asthma. Identification and avoidance of specific asthma triggers is imperative to help achieve optimal control of asthma. The most common environmental asthma triggers are allergens (inhalants such as house dust mites, pollens, molds, and animal dander), viral respiratory infections, exercise, and cigarette smoke. Other triggers may include cold air, humidity, occupational exposures, menses, emotional stress, pollutants, sulfite sensitivity, and ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. There are a variety of medical conditions that can mimic asthma. These conditions must be considered in a patient who continues to experience symptoms despite being on optimal medical treatment for asthma. They include acid reflux or GERD, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction (or paradoxical vocal cord movement), upper airway obstruction, foreign body aspiration, Churg-Strauss Vasculitis, Chronic Eosinophilic Pneumonia, Hyper-eosinophilic Syndrome, ACE-inhibitor-induced cough, COPD, pulmonary embolism, congestive heart failure, cystic fibrosis, sarcoidosis, post-viral tussive syndrome and bronchiectasis. Optimal asthma control is often difficult to achieve until co-morbid (or co-existing) medical conditions have been properly addressed and managed. Co-morbid conditions to consider in the asthmatic patient include environmental allergic disease, chronic sinusitis, obstructive sleep apnea, GERD, tobacco abuse, Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis, corticosteroid resistance, occupational exposures, obesity, and Type II diabetes mellitus. Asthma is usually suspected when the characteristic symptoms occur, especially at nighttime, with exercise, with colds or with allergy flare-ups. Definitive diagnosis and optimal treatment of each individual case requires not only periodic exams, but also measurements of lung function, starting by five or six years of age. This is done by using spirometry which is a type of lung test that measures the amount and rate of air flow from the lungs. Correlation of the results of a patient’s spirometry test with their clinical symptoms helps the physician decide whether or not a patient’s asthma is under optimal control and whether or not a patient’s medications should be increased, decreased or left unchanged. Allergy testing is typically performed as part of the initial evaluation of an individual with asthma since allergies are a trigger in up to 85% of individuals with asthma. Chest x-rays, blood work, and other tests are rarely needed for the diagnosis and management of asthma, unless other medical problems are suspected. Optimal management of asthma begins with utilizing the evidence-based NHLBI (National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute) asthma guidelines to stage the patient’s asthma based on impairment and severity. Treatment is then arranged with medications as appropriate to the level of disease. The goal of treatment is to develop a personalized, comprehensive treatment plan for the patient’s asthma that includes appropriate medical therapy, minimizes exposure to environmental triggers, treats underlying co-morbid conditions as discussed above, and patient education about their condition. The most common reason that patients experience suboptimal control of their asthma is that they do not take their medications as prescribed. This may occur for a variety of reasons, including non-compliance, poor device technique, lack of understanding of their disease condition, and/or socio-economic factors. There are three basic categories of asthma medications- the first is bronchodilators, which temporarily relieve symptoms by relaxing constricted bronchial tubes. These are typically used only when needed. The second is anti-inflammatory medications, which prevent or heal the inflammation inside the bronchial tubes. These are generally used every day, even when the patient feels well. The final category includes medicines that modify the immune system to try to prevent asthma symptoms. Depending on the patient’s history and the results of any allergy testing, specific measures may be recommended to help the patient minimize exposure to their asthma triggers, allergic or otherwise. This will help reduce the amount of medication needed to control the patient’s asthma. Also, allergy immunotherapy injections are the most effective long-term preventative strategy for allergy treatment. For patients with allergy-induced asthma desensitization with immunotherapy injections (allergy shots) can dramatically reduce allergy-induced symptoms and decrease the amount of medications necessary to control asthma. How Your Local Allergy Partners Physician Can Help Your Allergy Partners physician can help determine the cause of your asthma by combining a thorough medical history and physical examination with appropriate diagnostic testing. Allergy Partners’ physicians can help with administration of allergy immunotherapy when appropriate. They are also experts in the administration of Xolair. Allergy Partners’ physicians, nurses and asthma educators are dedicated to teaching patients about their asthma and asthma medications (including device technique), which greatly decreases the rate of medical non-compliance and inappropriate medication usage. Allergy Partners’ ongoing dedication to patient education is demonstrated by multiple useful tools on the Allergy Partners website, including a medical conditions library, instructional videos on proper medication device technique, pollen counts and blog.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

WASHINGTON, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Asthma is a chronic medical condition that affects over 20 million Americans, including 6 million children. It is a lung disorder in which the bronchioles, the inner lining of the small breathing tubes of the lungs, become inflamed and swollen. The muscles in the walls of the bronchioles may spasm, or narrow, causing symptoms of asthma which include chest tightness, wheezing, shortness of breath, or coughing. Individuals with mild asthma may not even be aware they have it, as wheezing may only be audible with a stethoscope if present at all. Rather than being a distinct clinical entity, asthma is now considered to represent overlapping syndromes with similar clinical features. Asthma may develop at any age, but most commonly occurs in early childhood, or mid-adulthood. Asthma that presents in childhood typically responds well to appropriate treatment and is often outgrown with time. Many cases that occur in adulthood respond well to treatment, but remain chronic. There is a strong genetic component to asthma, as approximately 40% of children who have asthmatic parents will develop asthma. Asthma also varies by ethnicity; for example, in 2006, asthma prevalence was found to be 20.1% higher in African Americans than in whites. Most patients with asthma, approximately 70%, have allergic disease. Most children with asthma have allergies that cause or significantly aggravate their asthma. As with many medical conditions, a combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure plays a role in the development of asthma. Identification and avoidance of specific asthma triggers is imperative to help achieve optimal control of asthma. The most common environmental asthma triggers are allergens (inhalants such as house dust mites, pollens, molds, and animal dander), viral respiratory infections, exercise, and cigarette smoke. Other triggers may include cold air, humidity, occupational exposures, menses, emotional stress, pollutants, sulfite sensitivity, and ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. There are a variety of medical conditions that can mimic asthma. These conditions must be considered in a patient who continues to experience symptoms despite being on optimal medical treatment for asthma. They include acid reflux or GERD, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction (or paradoxical vocal cord movement), upper airway obstruction, foreign body aspiration, Churg-Strauss Vasculitis, Chronic Eosinophilic Pneumonia, Hyper-eosinophilic Syndrome, ACE-inhibitor-induced cough, COPD, pulmonary embolism, congestive heart failure, cystic fibrosis, sarcoidosis, post-viral tussive syndrome and bronchiectasis. Optimal asthma control is often difficult to achieve until co-morbid (or co-existing) medical conditions have been properly addressed and managed. Co-morbid conditions to consider in the asthmatic patient include environmental allergic disease, chronic sinusitis, obstructive sleep apnea, GERD, tobacco abuse, Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis, corticosteroid resistance, occupational exposures, obesity, and Type II diabetes mellitus. Asthma is usually suspected when the characteristic symptoms occur, especially at nighttime, with exercise, with colds or with allergy flare-ups. Definitive diagnosis and optimal treatment of each individual case requires not only periodic exams, but also measurements of lung function, starting by five or six years of age. This is done by using spirometry which is a type of lung test that measures the amount and rate of air flow from the lungs. Correlation of the results of a patient’s spirometry test with their clinical symptoms helps the physician decide whether or not a patient’s asthma is under optimal control and whether or not a patient’s medications should be increased, decreased or left unchanged. Allergy testing is typically performed as part of the initial evaluation of an individual with asthma since allergies are a trigger in up to 85% of individuals with asthma. Chest x-rays, blood work, and other tests are rarely needed for the diagnosis and management of asthma, unless other medical problems are suspected. Optimal management of asthma begins with utilizing the evidence-based NHLBI (National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute) asthma guidelines to stage the patient’s asthma based on impairment and severity. Treatment is then arranged with medications as appropriate to the level of disease. The goal of treatment is to develop a personalized, comprehensive treatment plan for the patient’s asthma that includes appropriate medical therapy, minimizes exposure to environmental triggers, treats underlying co-morbid conditions as discussed above, and patient education about their condition. The most common reason that patients experience suboptimal control of their asthma is that they do not take their medications as prescribed. This may occur for a variety of reasons, including non-compliance, poor device technique, lack of understanding of their disease condition, and/or socio-economic factors. There are three basic categories of asthma medications- the first is bronchodilators, which temporarily relieve symptoms by relaxing constricted bronchial tubes. These are typically used only when needed. The second is anti-inflammatory medications, which prevent or heal the inflammation inside the bronchial tubes. These are generally used every day, even when the patient feels well. The final category includes medicines that modify the immune system to try to prevent asthma symptoms. Depending on the patient’s history and the results of any allergy testing, specific measures may be recommended to help the patient minimize exposure to their asthma triggers, allergic or otherwise. This will help reduce the amount of medication needed to control the patient’s asthma. Also, allergy immunotherapy injections are the most effective long-term preventative strategy for allergy treatment. For patients with allergy-induced asthma desensitization with immunotherapy injections (allergy shots) can dramatically reduce allergy-induced symptoms and decrease the amount of medications necessary to control asthma. How Your Local Allergy Partners Physician Can Help Your Allergy Partners physician can help determine the cause of your asthma by combining a thorough medical history and physical examination with appropriate diagnostic testing. Allergy Partners’ physicians can help with administration of allergy immunotherapy when appropriate. They are also experts in the administration of Xolair. Allergy Partners’ physicians, nurses and asthma educators are dedicated to teaching patients about their asthma and asthma medications (including device technique), which greatly decreases the rate of medical non-compliance and inappropriate medication usage. Allergy Partners’ ongoing dedication to patient education is demonstrated by multiple useful tools on the Allergy Partners website, including a medical conditions library, instructional videos on proper medication device technique, pollen counts and blog.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

WASHINGTON, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Asthma is a chronic medical condition that affects over 20 million Americans, including 6 million children. It is a lung disorder in which the bronchioles, the inner lining of the small breathing tubes of the lungs, become inflamed and swollen. The muscles in the walls of the bronchioles may spasm, or narrow, causing symptoms of asthma which include chest tightness, wheezing, shortness of breath, or coughing. Individuals with mild asthma may not even be aware they have it, as wheezing may only be audible with a stethoscope if present at all. Rather than being a distinct clinical entity, asthma is now considered to represent overlapping syndromes with similar clinical features. Asthma may develop at any age, but most commonly occurs in early childhood, or mid-adulthood. Asthma that presents in childhood typically responds well to appropriate treatment and is often outgrown with time. Many cases that occur in adulthood respond well to treatment, but remain chronic. There is a strong genetic component to asthma, as approximately 40% of children who have asthmatic parents will develop asthma. Asthma also varies by ethnicity; for example, in 2006, asthma prevalence was found to be 20.1% higher in African Americans than in whites. Most patients with asthma, approximately 70%, have allergic disease. Most children with asthma have allergies that cause or significantly aggravate their asthma. As with many medical conditions, a combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure plays a role in the development of asthma. Identification and avoidance of specific asthma triggers is imperative to help achieve optimal control of asthma. The most common environmental asthma triggers are allergens (inhalants such as house dust mites, pollens, molds, and animal dander), viral respiratory infections, exercise, and cigarette smoke. Other triggers may include cold air, humidity, occupational exposures, menses, emotional stress, pollutants, sulfite sensitivity, and ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. There are a variety of medical conditions that can mimic asthma. These conditions must be considered in a patient who continues to experience symptoms despite being on optimal medical treatment for asthma. They include acid reflux or GERD, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction (or paradoxical vocal cord movement), upper airway obstruction, foreign body aspiration, Churg-Strauss Vasculitis, Chronic Eosinophilic Pneumonia, Hyper-eosinophilic Syndrome, ACE-inhibitor-induced cough, COPD, pulmonary embolism, congestive heart failure, cystic fibrosis, sarcoidosis, post-viral tussive syndrome and bronchiectasis. Optimal asthma control is often difficult to achieve until co-morbid (or co-existing) medical conditions have been properly addressed and managed. Co-morbid conditions to consider in the asthmatic patient include environmental allergic disease, chronic sinusitis, obstructive sleep apnea, GERD, tobacco abuse, Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis, corticosteroid resistance, occupational exposures, obesity, and Type II diabetes mellitus. Asthma is usually suspected when the characteristic symptoms occur, especially at nighttime, with exercise, with colds or with allergy flare-ups. Definitive diagnosis and optimal treatment of each individual case requires not only periodic exams, but also measurements of lung function, starting by five or six years of age. This is done by using spirometry which is a type of lung test that measures the amount and rate of air flow from the lungs. Correlation of the results of a patient’s spirometry test with their clinical symptoms helps the physician decide whether or not a patient’s asthma is under optimal control and whether or not a patient’s medications should be increased, decreased or left unchanged. Allergy testing is typically performed as part of the initial evaluation of an individual with asthma since allergies are a trigger in up to 85% of individuals with asthma. Chest x-rays, blood work, and other tests are rarely needed for the diagnosis and management of asthma, unless other medical problems are suspected. Optimal management of asthma begins with utilizing the evidence-based NHLBI (National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute) asthma guidelines to stage the patient’s asthma based on impairment and severity. Treatment is then arranged with medications as appropriate to the level of disease. The goal of treatment is to develop a personalized, comprehensive treatment plan for the patient’s asthma that includes appropriate medical therapy, minimizes exposure to environmental triggers, treats underlying co-morbid conditions as discussed above, and patient education about their condition. The most common reason that patients experience suboptimal control of their asthma is that they do not take their medications as prescribed. This may occur for a variety of reasons, including non-compliance, poor device technique, lack of understanding of their disease condition, and/or socio-economic factors. There are three basic categories of asthma medications- the first is bronchodilators, which temporarily relieve symptoms by relaxing constricted bronchial tubes. These are typically used only when needed. The second is anti-inflammatory medications, which prevent or heal the inflammation inside the bronchial tubes. These are generally used every day, even when the patient feels well. The final category includes medicines that modify the immune system to try to prevent asthma symptoms. Depending on the patient’s history and the results of any allergy testing, specific measures may be recommended to help the patient minimize exposure to their asthma triggers, allergic or otherwise. This will help reduce the amount of medication needed to control the patient’s asthma. Also, allergy immunotherapy injections are the most effective long-term preventative strategy for allergy treatment. For patients with allergy-induced asthma desensitization with immunotherapy injections (allergy shots) can dramatically reduce allergy-induced symptoms and decrease the amount of medications necessary to control asthma. How Your Local Allergy Partners Physician Can Help Your Allergy Partners physician can help determine the cause of your asthma by combining a thorough medical history and physical examination with appropriate diagnostic testing. Allergy Partners’ physicians can help with administration of allergy immunotherapy when appropriate. They are also experts in the administration of Xolair. Allergy Partners’ physicians, nurses and asthma educators are dedicated to teaching patients about their asthma and asthma medications (including device technique), which greatly decreases the rate of medical non-compliance and inappropriate medication usage. Allergy Partners’ ongoing dedication to patient education is demonstrated by multiple useful tools on the Allergy Partners website, including a medical conditions library, instructional videos on proper medication device technique, pollen counts and blog.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

WASHINGTON, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Asthma is a chronic medical condition that affects over 20 million Americans, including 6 million children. It is a lung disorder in which the bronchioles, the inner lining of the small breathing tubes of the lungs, become inflamed and swollen. The muscles in the walls of the bronchioles may spasm, or narrow, causing symptoms of asthma which include chest tightness, wheezing, shortness of breath, or coughing. Individuals with mild asthma may not even be aware they have it, as wheezing may only be audible with a stethoscope if present at all. Rather than being a distinct clinical entity, asthma is now considered to represent overlapping syndromes with similar clinical features. Asthma may develop at any age, but most commonly occurs in early childhood, or mid-adulthood. Asthma that presents in childhood typically responds well to appropriate treatment and is often outgrown with time. Many cases that occur in adulthood respond well to treatment, but remain chronic. There is a strong genetic component to asthma, as approximately 40% of children who have asthmatic parents will develop asthma. Asthma also varies by ethnicity; for example, in 2006, asthma prevalence was found to be 20.1% higher in African Americans than in whites. Most patients with asthma, approximately 70%, have allergic disease. Most children with asthma have allergies that cause or significantly aggravate their asthma. As with many medical conditions, a combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure plays a role in the development of asthma. Identification and avoidance of specific asthma triggers is imperative to help achieve optimal control of asthma. The most common environmental asthma triggers are allergens (inhalants such as house dust mites, pollens, molds, and animal dander), viral respiratory infections, exercise, and cigarette smoke. Other triggers may include cold air, humidity, occupational exposures, menses, emotional stress, pollutants, sulfite sensitivity, and ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. There are a variety of medical conditions that can mimic asthma. These conditions must be considered in a patient who continues to experience symptoms despite being on optimal medical treatment for asthma. They include acid reflux or GERD, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction (or paradoxical vocal cord movement), upper airway obstruction, foreign body aspiration, Churg-Strauss Vasculitis, Chronic Eosinophilic Pneumonia, Hyper-eosinophilic Syndrome, ACE-inhibitor-induced cough, COPD, pulmonary embolism, congestive heart failure, cystic fibrosis, sarcoidosis, post-viral tussive syndrome and bronchiectasis. Optimal asthma control is often difficult to achieve until co-morbid (or co-existing) medical conditions have been properly addressed and managed. Co-morbid conditions to consider in the asthmatic patient include environmental allergic disease, chronic sinusitis, obstructive sleep apnea, GERD, tobacco abuse, Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis, corticosteroid resistance, occupational exposures, obesity, and Type II diabetes mellitus. Asthma is usually suspected when the characteristic symptoms occur, especially at nighttime, with exercise, with colds or with allergy flare-ups. Definitive diagnosis and optimal treatment of each individual case requires not only periodic exams, but also measurements of lung function, starting by five or six years of age. This is done by using spirometry which is a type of lung test that measures the amount and rate of air flow from the lungs. Correlation of the results of a patient’s spirometry test with their clinical symptoms helps the physician decide whether or not a patient’s asthma is under optimal control and whether or not a patient’s medications should be increased, decreased or left unchanged. Allergy testing is typically performed as part of the initial evaluation of an individual with asthma since allergies are a trigger in up to 85% of individuals with asthma. Chest x-rays, blood work, and other tests are rarely needed for the diagnosis and management of asthma, unless other medical problems are suspected. Optimal management of asthma begins with utilizing the evidence-based NHLBI (National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute) asthma guidelines to stage the patient’s asthma based on impairment and severity. Treatment is then arranged with medications as appropriate to the level of disease. The goal of treatment is to develop a personalized, comprehensive treatment plan for the patient’s asthma that includes appropriate medical therapy, minimizes exposure to environmental triggers, treats underlying co-morbid conditions as discussed above, and patient education about their condition. The most common reason that patients experience suboptimal control of their asthma is that they do not take their medications as prescribed. This may occur for a variety of reasons, including non-compliance, poor device technique, lack of understanding of their disease condition, and/or socio-economic factors. There are three basic categories of asthma medications- the first is bronchodilators, which temporarily relieve symptoms by relaxing constricted bronchial tubes. These are typically used only when needed. The second is anti-inflammatory medications, which prevent or heal the inflammation inside the bronchial tubes. These are generally used every day, even when the patient feels well. The final category includes medicines that modify the immune system to try to prevent asthma symptoms. Depending on the patient’s history and the results of any allergy testing, specific measures may be recommended to help the patient minimize exposure to their asthma triggers, allergic or otherwise. This will help reduce the amount of medication needed to control the patient’s asthma. Also, allergy immunotherapy injections are the most effective long-term preventative strategy for allergy treatment. For patients with allergy-induced asthma desensitization with immunotherapy injections (allergy shots) can dramatically reduce allergy-induced symptoms and decrease the amount of medications necessary to control asthma. How Your Local Allergy Partners Physician Can Help Your Allergy Partners physician can help determine the cause of your asthma by combining a thorough medical history and physical examination with appropriate diagnostic testing. Allergy Partners’ physicians can help with administration of allergy immunotherapy when appropriate. They are also experts in the administration of Xolair. Allergy Partners’ physicians, nurses and asthma educators are dedicated to teaching patients about their asthma and asthma medications (including device technique), which greatly decreases the rate of medical non-compliance and inappropriate medication usage. Allergy Partners’ ongoing dedication to patient education is demonstrated by multiple useful tools on the Allergy Partners website, including a medical conditions library, instructional videos on proper medication device technique, pollen counts and blog.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BOSTON -- Researchers from Hebrew Senior Life's Institute for Aging Research have discovered that foot pain - particularly severe foot pain - correlates to a higher incidence of recurrent falls. This finding also extends to those diagnosed with planus foot posture (flat feet), indicating that both foot pain and foot posture may play a role in falls among older adults. Using data from the Framingham Foot study, researchers found that foot pain and foot posture were not associated with any one fall; however, in the case of multiple falls, foot pain and foot posture were often a factor. These findings were published today in the journal Gerontology. "We know that having more than one fall can be of concern. Many don't think of feet as the culprit. However, higher odds of recurrent falls were seen for those with foot pain, especially severe foot pain, as well as those with planus foot posture, indicating that both foot pain and foot posture may play a role in falls," said Marian Hannan, Co -Director of the Musculoskeletal Research Center at the Institute for Aging Research and Associate Professor of Public Health, Harvard School of Public Health. "This is important because falls are a serious problem for older adults. They are a leading cause of hospitalization and often lead to a loss of independence, a decrease in quality of life, and sometimes death. With this new knowledge we hope to find more solutions to lessen the risk of falls in older adults," said Lead author Arunima Awale, Research Associate at Hebrew Senior Life's Institute for Aging Research. More than 30 percent of individuals over the age of 65 fall at least once a year. This figure increases to over 40% for persons aged 75 years or older. As a result of this study, scientists are hopeful that by lessening the instance of foot pain in older adults they can significantly reduce hospitalizations and loss of independence for American seniors. This study was supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease and National Institute of Aging (grant number AR047853); and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Framingham Heart Study N01-HC-25195). About the Institute for Aging Research Scientists at the Institute for Aging Research seek to transform the human experience of aging by conducting research that will ensure a life of health, dignity and productivity into advanced age. The Institute carries out rigorous studies that discover the mechanisms of age-related disease and disability; lead to the prevention, treatment and cure of disease; advance the standard of care for older people; and inform public decision-making. The Aging Brain Center within IFAR studies cognitive aging and conditions affecting brain health. Hebrew SeniorLife, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, is a national senior services leader uniquely dedicated to rethinking, researching and redefining the possibilities of aging. Founded in Boston in 1903, the nonprofit, non-sectarian organization today provides communities and health care for seniors, research into aging, and education for geriatric care providers. For more information about Hebrew SeniorLife, visit http://www. , follow us on Twitter @H_SeniorLife, like us on Facebook or read our blog.

Loading Lung and Blood Institute collaborators
Loading Lung and Blood Institute collaborators