San Francisco, CA, United States
San Francisco, CA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | October 4, 2016
Site: www.technologyreview.com

… unless you measure intelligence in terms of your ability to play brain-training games. Brain-training apps promise to give your mind a workout over fun and frivolous activities, while also giving rise to deeper-seated improvements in your cognitive abilities. But there’s always been a nagging question hovering over them: do they really work? Now NPR reports that seven psychologists have spent two years sifting through 374 scientific studies cited by companies like Lumos Labs and Posit Science, which make the world’s leading brain-training products. The results? According to the researchers, brain-training games certainly make people better at playing brain-training games. But the study, published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest, found “little evidence that training enhances performance on distantly related tasks or that training improves everyday cognitive performance.” The research also found problems with the studies themselves, with many investigations designed in such a way that definitive conclusions should not be drawn from them. Its ultimate conclusion is fairly clear: “There does not yet appear to be sufficient evidence to justify the claim that brain training is an effective tool for enhancing real-world cognition.” The study has been well-received by other academic psychologists. Talking to the Atlantic, Michael Kane from the University of North Carolina called it “a tour de force,” while Ulrich Mayr, from the University of Oregon, thinks that it “leaves nothing out—and the evidence is unimpressive.” Makers of the apps are, predictably, a little more defensive. Speaking to USA Today,  Erica Perng from Lumos Labs said that the brain-training software “draws on research that has developed over decades, but ... at the forefront of a new and rapidly innovating field ... there is a lot we don't yet know.” Writing for the Daily News, Daniel Willingham, a psychology professor at the University of Virginia, summed up the findings neatly for regular folks. “What should you tell your elderly father who worries that he’s thinking a little slower?” he asks. “Staying mentally active is always a good idea, and if they enjoy the games, playing them can’t hurt. But simple tasks that make you smarter remain a hope, not a reality.”


News Article | December 17, 2016
Site: www.cnet.com

I'll never forget the look of fear on my mother's face. My mother was a brilliant woman. She earned three bachelor's degrees and a master's, and could have become a doctor if not for the rampant sexism she faced in college in the early '60s. Instead, she worked for a major airline, where she applied her math smarts calculating a cargo load's weight and balance that would allow a plane to safely take off. But after spending nearly a decade working the overnight shift, she was starting to get absent-minded. At first it was little things, like she'd go somewhere without the documents she needed. Then it was big things. Then she got in a car accident. My mother was shocked when she came out of the doctor's office after weeks of testing. She was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. At 57 years old. My mother was told to do anything that required thinking. She did crosswords. She read books. And since she was already good at math, she calculated the value of her invested retirement nest egg against the stock market's moves. If she were alive today, she probably would type Alzheimer's into an app store. The first hit is an Alzheimer's patient-care app called MindMate, which includes interactive brain games it claims will "stimulate user's cognitive abilities based on world-leading research." There are dozens more. Over the past few years, there's been an explosion of apps and websites promising to solve what medical science hasn't. Many claim they'll improve the brain, or even help fend off the disease. Experts say nearly all are peddling false hope to people who have just been told they're going to lose their minds. There's no scientific proof any of these apps do what they claim. But since more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's there's big demand for a fix. "People are willing to try anything when they're desperate," says Creighton Phelps, a deputy director at the National Institute on Aging. So what helps? Data suggests activities like learning a new language or reading about something far outside your comfort zone could delay the symptoms from worsening. And researchers this year reported that a specific kind of computer game could even prevent dementia. Brain-training games typically ask players to perform tasks like remembering the shape on a card, re-creating a pattern or identifying the direction fish are swimming. You might get good at the games, but there's no scientific proof they, or apps like them, do any more than entertain. Remember the marketing blitz from Lumos Labs? The company claimed its puzzle app Lumosity could do just about anything, from helping with schoolwork to protecting against dementia -- even improve "outcomes in combat veterans suffering from traumatic brain injuries." That got the attention of Michelle Rusk, an attorney in the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Consumer Protection. She found science didn't support Lumos' marketing. The FTC filed a complaint against Lumos (PDF) alleging it deceived consumers with "a host of false or misleading" claims, including scientific studies "that prove training with Lumosity provides a long list of real-world benefits." "Lumosity preyed on consumers' fears about age-related cognitive decline, suggesting their games could stave off memory loss, dementia and even Alzheimer's disease," the FTC said in a statement earlier this year. "But Lumosity simply did not have the science to back up its ads." "Lumosity's case is interesting because we didn't say it was absolutely fraudulent and of no value," says Rusk. Instead, the order banned Lumos from making claims it can't back up. The company now sells Lumosity as "delightful" entertainment. "If you're going to spend time, why not spend time doing something that's fun and entertaining and emotionally makes you feel better?" says Lumos CEO Steve Berkowitz. MindMate, one of the top hits on the app store for Alzheimer's searches, has taken a similar tack. The company, which calls itself the "world's leading Alzheimer's platform," has said its interactive brain games "increase user's cognitive abilities based on world-leading research." But it's begun to change its marketing materials after research consultants raised concerns. "We're not claiming we're slowing down progression," says Patrick Renner, co-founder and managing director at MindMate. Well, not anymore. MindMate's app includes memory games along with nutrition and exercise advice meant to help users "stay physically and mentally fit" and a music and TV section that lets users watch hits from the '40s through the '80s. In March, the Scotland-based company won a contract with the National Health Service operating in the Glasgow region, for use of the app by support groups, family caregivers and assisted living housing facilities. About 15,000 people use the app at least once a month, the company said. A speed-training game used in a 10-year study made headlines earlier this year when the Alzheimer's Association highlighted results showing it can cut the risk of dementia by half. The study -- called Active, for Advanced Cognitive Training in Vital Elderly -- asked 2,832 healthy adults, ages 65 to 94, to simultaneously identify objects in the center and along the edges of a computer screen. It's called speed training because correct answers trigger the game to display more objects at an ever-faster rate. The game could look like this: You see cows in a pasture. Two cars are in the center of the pasture and road signs are scattered around the edges. Now identify one of the cars (the convertible, not the coupe) and the Route 66 sign, but without moving your head or eyes. As you progress, you'll see more distractions but have less time to spot them. "It's fundamentally a new kind of medicine," says Henry Mahncke, CEO of Posit Science. In 2008, the company acquired the brain-training game used in the Active study. Posit Science now offers an updated version, called Double Decision, as part of its BrainHQ online service. Mahncke emphatically believes such apps could rewire the brain, and he thinks doctors will begin writing prescriptions for apps like Posit's within the next five years. He plans to seek approval from the Food and Drug Administration sometime soon. Doctors "want low-cost intervention," he says. After regulatory approval that's exactly what these apps will offer. But using apps won't be the only thing doctors tell patients to do. Joaquin A. Anguera, assistant professor at the University of California, San Francisco's School of Medicine, says treating Alzheimer's will ultimately require "a cocktail effect" of exercise, medicine and, yes, an app. "You need a little of this, a little of that and a little of another." No one really knows why my mother got so sick so early in her life. Between poor record keeping and the general fuzziness that comes with time, it's hard to tell how far back Alzheimer's or dementia goes in my family. I do know my father's mother had it. My father hasn't developed symptoms and neither has my older brother. In the meantime, I look at my infant son and wonder if there's anything I can do today to avoid what happened to my mother. There is no cure. I'm hopeful there will be. This story appears in the winter 2016 edition of CNET Magazine. For other magazine stories, click here.


News Article | February 18, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

Aaron Gordon would become the center of the basketball universe when he stepped on the court Saturday night for the NBA's annual slam dunk contest. He'd be turning to an app to help get his mind right. The third-year Orlando Magic forward, who's on the cusp of a breakout season, says a nearly year-old app called Lucid is helping make the difference with his game. "I think 80 percent of the game is mental and the other 20 is physical," said Gordon, who's also an investor in the app. He said the mental exercises, like "Training Your Mental Core," help him cope with key moments during games. "You can't perform in pressure situations if you're not locked in and in tune with yourself." While Gordon was the odds-on favorite to win this year's throw down, after losing the 2016 slam fest by just a few points in an epic battle, he lost again Saturday to Indiana Pacer Glenn Robinson III. While using an Intel drone overhead to "pass" him a basketball for a windmill dunk, Gordon lacked his usual explosiveness and finished in last place. He recently missed several games for the Magic due to a bone bruise in his leg. It's not uncommon for pro athletes like him to look for competitive advantages to improve their focus. Lucid is among more than a dozen mental-training apps, including Calm, Headspace and Peak Performance, that specialize in visualization, goal-setting and meditation that the apps makers say helps everyone from top athletes to office-workers succeed. Lucid was co-created by Gordon's mental coach, San Francisco-based sports psychologist Graham Betchart, and Jason Stirman, a Silicon Valley insider. The app is designed to help build confidence, said Stirman, Lucid's CEO. It costs $10 a month and is available on iOS and Android, has counted more than 100,000 downloads since debuting in May. Besides Gordon, New York Jets standout wide receiver Brandon Marshall is also a big advocate and an unofficial spokesman for Lucid, Stirman said. Marshall, who was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder in 2011, frequently promotes the app across his social media platforms and his nonprofit. Last fall, he paid for hundreds of New York City high school football players to use Lucid for free. Still, whether mental-training apps actually work remains a subject for debate. Almost all of them that promise to help people diagnosed with dementia and Alzheimer's have no scientific evidence to back up the claims. In one infamous case, the Federal Trade Commission sued Lumos Labs, which claimed its Lumosity app could do everything from help with homework to protect against dementia, all through playing its games. Lumos ultimately settled. Lucid, for its part, has received generally positive reviews on its app from users ranging from a competitive runner to a roller derby skater to someone trying to lose 25 pounds. Meanwhile, medical experts have mixed views about the benefits from these types of apps. Bill Cole, a renowned sports psychologist and "mental-game coach," said athletes may see mental-training apps as aids to their workouts, but that doesn't mean the apps are actually doing much. "There's definitely a placebo effect," he said. Others, like A. Mark Williams, chair of the health, kinesiology and recreation department at the University of Utah, say that while some of these apps may lead to short-term improvements, they need more scientific study to prove their effectiveness. In 2015, Stirman, a former executive at Twitter and Medium, was coming up with ideas for a mental-training app when he met Betchart through a mutual friend. The energetic Betchart provides the voice for more than 300 training sessions on the app, each lasting about five minutes. He delivers in a midtempo cadence, leading you through breathing exercises, or telling you things like how staying in the moment can unlock your potential. He uses slogans and catchphrases including "MVP" (meditation, visualization and positive affirmations) and "fear is an illusion." "Throughout your competition, you may find yourself in challenging and uncomfortable situations. Your mind wanders and you worry about future outcomes," Betchart says during one session. "But you must know that your greatness lies within the present in order to attack the task at hand." Betchart says his app is also designed using the teachings of George Mumford, now an advisor for his company, who's worked with NBA greats Michael Jordan, Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O'Neal. Betchart himself is also well-regarded for his work with today's NBA stars, including Gordon and Minnesota Timberwolves guard Zach LaVine (who beat Gordon in the slam dunk contest) and LaVine's 'Wolves teammates Andrew Wiggins, the top overall NBA draft pick in 2014, and Karl-Anthony Towns, last season's top overall pick and NBA Rookie of the Year. Betchart has also worked with this season's overall top draft pick, Ben Simmons of the Philadelphia 76ers. The players all have bought into Betchart's philosophy of "good athletes become great." They also believe in Betchart's "WIN" (what's important now) strategy, and the "next play speed" method. "Can you shoot an airball on one play, and go in for a thunderous dunk on the next play?" Betchart said, describing his approach. "How fast can you fail, refocus and move on?" Betchart has been offering similar preachings to Gordon since they met eight years ago. He was a coaching consultant and the player was a lone 13-year-old freshman phenom playing on his high school varsity basketball team. Struggling with the enormous expectations, Gordon asked Betchart if Betchart could help him stay on track to reach the NBA. Betchart said with Gordon it's all about harnessing his impatience. Betchart has been there through state championships in high school, a Final Four appearance during Gordon's lone season playing in college, and, finally, Gordon's cracking into the starting lineup with the Magic this season despite injuries. "He wants it all now," said Betchart, who will be with Gordon at this year's dunk contest in New Orleans. "He's so driven and puts so much pressure on himself to be great. The big work on my end is letting him know to stay in the present." Prior to last year's dunk contest, Gordon envisioned his slams during his numerous sessions with Betchart. "I was replaying the dunks in my mind so much that by the time the contest started and once I was on that stage, I said to myself, 'Oh, I've already done it. I got this!'" he said. It must have worked. Gordon unleashed some of the greatest dunks ever, which went viral on the internet and had basketball fans worldwide lit. Many point to the dunk of him soaring high above Stuff, the Magic's mascot, while wrapping the ball under his legs and slamming it down. The 21-year-old Gordon is well aware he's among the biggest attractions this weekend. He could even get more attention from fans than actual all-star game stalwarts LeBron James and Stephen Curry. But Gordon realizes he needs to keep his focus if his success is going to continue. "I just want to continue that journey," he said. CNET Magazine: Check out a sampling of the stories you'll find in CNET's newsstand edition. Batteries Not Included: The CNET team shares experiences that remind us why tech stuff is cool.


News Article | December 27, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

— The market research analyst predicts the education apps market in the US to grow at a CAGR of approximately 31% during the forecast period. The rising penetration of e-learning and m-learning in educational institutions is expected to result in the extensive digitization of educational methodologies. This extensive digitization of educational methodologies is anticipated to bolster growth in the education apps market during the forecast period. The growing demand for e-learning is the key driver for the growth of this market. The rising adoption of gadgets, such as tablets and laptops, by students, is expected to pave the way for digital textbooks and other online educational content. Since e-learning facilitates customized learning for students by preventing the generalization of educational content; their augmented adoption is envisaged to result in market growth during the forecast period. For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com Product-based segmentation of the education apps market in the US • Pre-primary education • Primary and secondary education • Higher education In this market study, analysts have estimated the primary and secondary education segment to be the largest market segment during the forecast period. Much of this segment’s growth can be attributed to factors like the growing preference for blended learning and the rapid growth of the virtual schools in the US region. Competitive landscape and key vendors The market for education apps in the US is highly competitive and is primarily dominated by pure-play education technology vendors and large technology vendors like Google, Apple, and Microsoft. Since this market has low entry barriers, the entry of new players is estimated to result in market fragmentation during the forecast period. The top vendors in the market include - • Duo Lingo • Edmodo • Lumos Labs • Rosetta Stone • WizIQ The other prominent vendors of the market include Age of learning, BenchPrep, Duo Labs, and IXL Learning Key questions answered in the report include • What will the market size and the growth rate be in 2019? • What are the key factors driving the education apps market in the US? • What are the key market trends impacting the growth of the education apps market in the US? • What are the challenges to market growth? • Who are the key vendors in this market space? • What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the vendors in the education apps market in the US? • What are the key outcomes of the five forces analysis of the education apps market in the US? PART 05: Market landscape • Global mobile applications market • Market overview • Market size and forecast • Global education apps market verses education apps market in US 2014-2019 • Five forces analysis PART 06: Market segmentation by product • Education apps market in US by product segmentation • Education apps market in US by pre-primary education • Education apps market in US by primary and secondary education • Education apps market in US by higher education For more informaion or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com ABOUT US: Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports features an exhaustive list of market research reports from hundreds of publishers worldwide. We boast a database spanning virtually every market category and an even more comprehensive collection of market research reports under these categories and sub-categories. For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com


News Article | January 6, 2016
Site: techcrunch.com

Lumos Labs, the creator of “brain training program” Lumosity with $67.5 million in venture funding, has agreed to pay a $2 million settlement to the Federal Trade Commission for its deceptive advertising. As part of the settlement, the company has to notify all of its customers who signed up for an auto-renewal plan between Jan. 1, 2009 and Dec. 31, 2014 about the FTC settlement, and give them the chance to cancel their subscriptions. Before making future claims about Lumosity’s potential benefits on brain performance, the U.S. District Court in San Francisco has ordered that Lumos Labs must “possess and rely upon competent and reliable scientific evidence.” In the FTC’s complaint, it claimed that Lumos Labs deceived people with “unfounded claims” that the app could help people perform better in school, at work and reduce or improve cognitive impairment. The FTC says Lumos Labs did not have the science to back up its claims. The complaint also alleges that Lumos Labs failed to disclose that some of the consumer testimonials had been solicited through contests that promised prizes like a free iPad and a round-trip flight to San Francisco. “Lumosity preyed on consumers’ fears about age-related cognitive decline, suggesting their games could stave off memory loss, dementia, and even Alzheimer’s disease,” FTC Bureau of Consumer Protection Director Jessica Rich said in a statement. “But Lumosity simply did not have the science to back up its ads.” Lumosity’s program has more than 40 games that focus on memory, attention, flexibility, problem solving and processing speed. The programs are available via subscriptions ranging from an $11.95 monthly fee to $299.95 for a lifetime membership. “Neither the action nor the settlement pertains to the rigor of our research or the quality of the products — it is a reflection of marketing language that has been discontinued,” Lumosity told TechCrunch in a statement. “Our focus as a company has not and will not change: We remain committed to moving the science of cognitive training forward and contributing meaningfully to the field’s community and body of research.” The statement went on to say: “Lumosity has made strong contributions to the scientific community, including our work with the Human Cognition Project initiative. We invest heavily in research and game development to ensure that our products are engaging and provide value to users. The recent peer-reviewed clinical test published in the journal PLOS One is a large, randomized, active-controlled trial of our cognitive training program. The study reported that participants who trained with Lumosity for 10 weeks improved on an aggregate assessment of cognition. Going forward, a key focus of our ongoing research is to build on these studies to better understand how training-driven improvements on tests of cognition translate to performance in participants’ everyday lives.”


News Article | October 4, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

An extensive review of more than 300 studies found insufficient evidence to support claims made by digital “brain-training” game companies that their products improve cognitive abilities. The review was published by a team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign in the journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest this week. The researchers set out to settle the years-long debate on the efficacy of “brain games” for improving cognition. In 2014, an international group of more than 70 scientists wrote an open letter challenging claims made by brain game developers, stating there was a lack of scientific data to support the claims that the games improve cognitive functioning or stave off cognitive decline. In response to the letter, another group of 133 scientists and practitioners from around the world struck back, contending that the scientific literature analyzing brain games is filled with demonstrations and examples of the benefits of brain training on a wide variety of cognitive and everyday activities. According to the University of Illinois study, the disagreement could be the result of using different standards when evaluating the evidence. “To date, the field has lacked a comprehensive review of the brain-training literature, one that examines both the quantity and the quality of the evidence according to a well-defined set of best practices,” wrote the researchers. After reviewing 374 studies, the team of seven scientists noted that many had “major shortcoming” in design or analysis, and did not adhere to the proper standards that are essential in drawing clear conclusions. Some of the shortcomings included participant groups that were just too small, while others did not set up proper control groups. Additionally, numerous studies did not take into account the “placebo effect,” where participants appeared to improve on a cognitive test simply because they were trying harder. While some studies did show improvement related to a specific task, the results did not translate to broader, real-world applications. For example, a brain-training game focusing on the memorization of numbers could not help participants in related tasks, such as recalling a family member’s phone number. “In effect, each training regimen led to improvements on the trained task, with some near transfer to proximal measures of the same skill but no evidence of transfer beyond the trained task, not even to standardized measures of everyday analogues of the trained abilities,” the researchers wrote. The results don’t come as a total surprise. In January, Lumos Labs, the creators of the popular brain-training program Lumosity, were fined $2 million from the Federal Trade Commission for unfounded claims that the games enhanced users’ performance at work and school, and reduced cognitive impairment associated with age and other health conditions. But according to the study, Lumosity still has more than 70 million members. A similar case was also seen in May with the developers of LearningRx, who settled on a $200,000 fine. “Based on our extensive review of the literature cited by brain-training companies in support of their claims, coupled with our review of related brain-training literatures that are not currently associated with a company or product, there does not yet appear to be sufficient evidence to justify the claim that brain training is an effective tool for enhancing real-world cognition,” the study concluded. The researchers also offered advice on ways to better manage future studies to avoid similar debates. “Methodological standards for intervention research have been relatively lax in much of the brain-training literature, and future research on this important topic should adhere more closely to best practices for intervention research, including preregistration, complete reporting, larger sample sizes and suitable controls for placebo effects.”


News Article | December 27, 2016
Site: www.technologyreview.com

From algorithms that spread fake news to glowing plants that don’t glow, here are our picks for the worst technologies of the year. Ever see those TV ads for “brain-training” games that will make you smarter? A San Francisco company, Lumos Labs, aggressively marketed online quizzes and memory tests under the brand Lumosity and said users would perform better in school and even postpone dementia. This October, a team of psychologists reviewing hundreds of studies concluded that brain games don’t make you smarter. By then, Lumos had already been fined $2 million by the Federal Trade Commission for false advertising. “Lumosity preyed on consumers’ fears about age-related cognitive decline,” said the FTC. “But Lumosity simply did not have the science to back up its ads.” Subscribe today Become an MIT Technology Review Insider for in-depth analysis and unparalleled perspective.


Wiseguyreports.Com Adds “Education Apps -Market Demand, Growth, Opportunities and analysis of Top Key Player Forecast to 2021” To Its Research Database This report studies sales (consumption) of Education Apps in Global market, especially in United States, China, Europe, Japan, focuses on top players in these regions/countries, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each player in these regions, covering Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with sales (consumption), revenue, market share and growth rate of Education Apps in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like United States China Europe Japan Split by product Types, with sales, revenue, price and gross margin, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Type I Type II Type III Split by applications, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of Education Apps in each application, can be divided into Application 1 Application 2 Application 3 Global Education Apps Sales Market Report 2016 1 Education Apps Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Education Apps 1.2 Classification of Education Apps 1.2.1 Type I 1.2.2 Type II 1.2.3 Type III 1.3 Application of Education Apps 1.3.1 Application 1 1.3.2 Application 2 1.3.3 Application 3 1.4 Education Apps Market by Regions 1.4.1 United States Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.2 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.3 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value and Volume) of Education Apps (2011-2021) 1.5.1 Global Education Apps Sales and Growth Rate (2011-2021) 1.5.2 Global Education Apps Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021) 7 Global Education Apps Manufacturers Analysis 7.1 Duo Lingo 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.1.2 Education Apps Product Type, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Type I 7.1.2.2 Type II 7.1.3 Duo Lingo Education Apps Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 Edmodo 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.2.2 106 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Type I 7.2.2.2 Type II 7.2.3 Edmodo Education Apps Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 Lumos Labs 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.3.2 121 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Type I 7.3.2.2 Type II 7.3.3 Lumos Labs Education Apps Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.4 Rosetta Stone 7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.4.2 Oct Product Type, Application and Specification 7.4.2.1 Type I 7.4.2.2 Type II 7.4.3 Rosetta Stone Education Apps Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.5 WizIQ 7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.5.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.5.2.1 Type I 7.5.2.2 Type II 7.5.3 WizIQ Education Apps Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.6 Age of learning 7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.6.2 Million USD Product Type, Application and Specification 7.6.2.1 Type I 7.6.2.2 Type II 7.6.3 Age of learning Education Apps Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.7 BenchPrep 7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.7.2 Electronics Product Type, Application and Specification 7.7.2.1 Type I 7.7.2.2 Type II 7.7.3 BenchPrep Education Apps Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.8 Duo Labs 7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.8.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.8.2.1 Type I 7.8.2.2 Type II 7.8.3 Duo Labs Education Apps Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.9 IXL Learning 7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.9.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.9.2.1 Type I 7.9.2.2 Type II 7.9.3 IXL Learning Education Apps Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview


News Article | January 5, 2016
Site: phys.org

The Federal Trade Commission said Tuesday the company's advertisements deceptively suggested that playing the games a few times a week could boost performance at work, in the classroom and even delay serious conditions like dementia. Under the settlement, Lumos Labs must contact its customers and offer them an easy way to cancel their subscriptions. The San Francisco company frequently promoted its games through national TV and radio stations including CNN, Fox News and National Public Radio. The company also used Google advertising services to drive traffic to its website, the FTC said in a statement. "Lumosity preyed on consumers' fears about age-related cognitive decline, suggesting their games could stave off memory loss, dementia, and even Alzheimer's disease," said Jessica Rich, a director in FTC's consumer protection unit. "But Lumosity simply did not have the science to back up its ads." Customers pay anywhere from $15, for a monthly subscription, or up to $300 for lifetime access to Lumosity's online and mobile apps. An FTC spokesman said Tuesday's action is the first government settlement with a maker of apps intended to boost brain health. Previous settlements have involved makers of dietary supplements and other products intended to boost mental performance. The government agency, which regulates consumer advertising, plans to refund the $2 million to Lumosity customers. The agency initially obtained a $50 million judgment against Lumos Labs, but the amount was downsized because of company's inability to pay. Lumosity is one of the most visible services in the burgeoning brain training industry, which has estimated sales of over $1 billion per year, according to trade publications. Under federal law, only products that have been reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration can claim to treat or prevent serious diseases or conditions. To date, the FDA has not approved any brain training programs. In 2014, more than 70 prominent neurology and psychology researchers published a consensus statement critical of the brain training industry, citing its "frequently exaggerated" marketing. "The aggressive advertising entices consumers to spend money on products and to take up new behaviors, such as gaming, based on these exaggerated claims," the experts said. While studies have shown that gaming participants can improve their performance on simple tasks, the experts concluded there is no compelling evidence that games "reduce or reverse cognitive decline." Explore further: FTC says AT&T misled customers with unlimited data


WiseGuyReports.Com Publish a New Market Research Report On –“Higher Education Game-based Learning Market Growth 2016 Global Analysis,Share,Trends and Forecast to 2020 Market Research Report”.Pune, India - November 18, 2016 /MarketersMedia/ — The analysts forecast the global higher education game-based learning market to grow at a CAGR of 13.95%. during the period 2016-2020. Serious games used in higher education are an effective way to engage students in learning activities, since they stimulate cognitive processes like problem-solving and deductive and inductive reasoning abilities. They also improve skills, which are needed for success in professional life, such as decision-making and multitasking. They enable higher education students to acquire knowledge about complex and technical subject matter with greater interest by capturing the attention of students effectively. The learning stance of students is changed from passive learning to active participation. Get Sample Report @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/584462-global-higher-education-game-based-learning-market-2016-2020 For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com Covered in this report The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global higher education game-based learning market for 2016-2020. To calculate the market size, the report considers the revenue generated from the sales of digital serious and simulation games, catering to the higher education segment. The market is divided into the following segments based on geography: • APAC • Europe • North America • ROW The report, Global Higher Education Game-Based Learning Market 2016-2020, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market. Complete Report Details @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/reports/584462-global-higher-education-game-based-learning-market-2016-2020 Key vendors • McGraw-Hill Education • PlayGen • Toolwire • Totem Learning Other prominent vendors • Lumos Labs • Triseum • Designing Digitally • Forio • Innovative Dutch • LearningWare • OakTree Simulations • Rosetta Stone • Triad Interactive Media Market driver • Rising enhancement of student and faculty experience • For a full, detailed list, view our report Market challenge • Weak metrics to assess effectiveness of games • For a full, detailed list, view our report Market trend • Rising use of AR and VR in game-based learning • For a full, detailed list, view our report Key questions answered in this report • What will the market size be in 2020 and what will the growth rate be? • What are the key market trends? • What is driving this market? • What are the challenges to market growth? • Who are the key vendors in this market space? • What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the key vendors? • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors? Table Of Contents – Major Key Points PART 01: Executive summary • Highlights PART 02: Scope of the report • Market overview • Top-vendor offerings PART 03: Market research methodology • Research methodology • Economic indicators PART 04: Introduction • Key market highlights PART 05: Market drivers • Rising enhancement of student and faculty experience • Increase in venture capital investments • Improvement in game development engines • Growing use of motion-sensing technology in game-based learning PART 06: Impact of drivers PART 07: Market challenges • Weak metrics to assess effectiveness of games • Skewed awareness of game-based learning • Limitations on curriculum integration • Threat from simulation-based learning market PART 08: Impact of drivers and challenges PART 09: Market trends • Rising use of AR and VR in game-based learning • Growth in adoption of tablets • Stronger focus on experiential and inquiry-based learning • Pressure on higher education institutions to produce outcomes PART 10: Market landscape • Global higher education market • Global game-based learning market • Global higher education game-based learning market • Five forces analysis ..……CONTINUED For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com Buy 1-User PDF @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/checkout?currency=one_user-USD&report_id=584462 ABOUT US: Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports features an exhaustive list of market research reports from hundreds of publishers worldwide. We boast a database spanning virtually every market category and an even more comprehensive collection of market research reports under these categories and sub-categories. For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.comContact Info:Name: Norah TrentEmail: sales@wiseguyreports.comOrganization: WiseGuy Research Consultants Pvt Ltd.Address: Office No. 528, Amanora Chambers Magarpatta Road, Hadapsar Pune - 411028Phone: +1-646-845-9349 Source: http://marketersmedia.com/higher-education-game-based-learning-market-growth-2016-global-analysissharetrends-and-forecast-to-2020-market-research-report/144322Release ID: 144322

Loading Lumos Labs collaborators
Loading Lumos Labs collaborators