Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster of Translational of Oncology

Vienna, Austria

Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster of Translational of Oncology

Vienna, Austria
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Hamilton G.,Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster of Translational of Oncology | Olszewski-Hamilton U.,Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster of Translational of Oncology | Theyer G.,Hospital Kittsee
Cancers | Year: 2011

Intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) therapy for prostate cancer patients attempts to maintain the hormone dependence of the tumor cells by cycles alternating between androgen suppression (AS) and treatment cessation till a certain prostate-specific antigen (PSA) threshold is reached. Side effects are expected to be reduced, compared to standard continuous androgen suppression (CAS) therapy. The present study examined the effect of IAS on bone metabolism by determinations of serum procollagen I N-terminal peptide (PINP), a biochemical marker of collagen synthesis. A total of 105 treatment cycles of 58 patients with prostate cancer stages ≥pT2 was studied assessing testosterone, PSA and PINP levels at monthly intervals. During phases of AS lasting for up to nine months PSA levels were reversibly reduced, indicating apoptotic regression of the prostatic tumors. Within the first cycle PINP increased at the end of the AS period and peaked in the treatment cessation phase. During the following two cycles a similar pattern was observed for PINP, except a break in collagen synthesis as indicated by low PINP levels in the first months off treatment. Therefore, measurements of the serum PINP concentration indicated increased bone matrix synthesis in response to >6 months of AS, which uninterruptedly continued into the first treatment cessation phase, with a break into each of the following two pauses. In summary, synthesis of bone matrix collagen increases while degradation decreases during off-treatment phases in patients undergoing IAS. Although a direct relationship between bone matrix turnover and risk of fractures is difficult to establish, IAS for treatment of biochemical progression of prostate tumors is expected to reduce osteoporosis in elderly men often at high risk for bone fractures representing a highly suitable patient population for this kind of therapy. © 2011 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


PubMed | Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster of Translational of Oncology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cancers | Year: 2013

Intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) therapy for prostate cancer patients attempts to maintain the hormone dependence of the tumor cells by cycles alternating between androgen suppression (AS) and treatment cessation till a certain prostate-specific antigen (PSA) threshold is reached. Side effects are expected to be reduced, compared to standard continuous androgen suppression (CAS) therapy. The present study examined the effect of IAS on bone metabolism by determinations of serum procollagen I N-terminal peptide (PINP), a biochemical marker of collagen synthesis. A total of 105 treatment cycles of 58 patients with prostate cancer stages pT2 was studied assessing testosterone, PSA and PINP levels at monthly intervals. During phases of AS lasting for up to nine months PSA levels were reversibly reduced, indicating apoptotic regression of the prostatic tumors. Within the first cycle PINP increased at the end of the AS period and peaked in the treatment cessation phase. During the following two cycles a similar pattern was observed for PINP, except a break in collagen synthesis as indicated by low PINP levels in the first months off treatment. Therefore, measurements of the serum PINP concentration indicated increased bone matrix synthesis in response to >6 months of AS, which uninterruptedly continued into the first treatment cessation phase, with a break into each of the following two pauses. In summary, synthesis of bone matrix collagen increases while degradation decreases during off-treatment phases in patients undergoing IAS. Although a direct relationship between bone matrix turnover and risk of fractures is difficult to establish, IAS for treatment of biochemical progression of prostate tumors is expected to reduce osteoporosis in elderly men often at high risk for bone fractures representing a highly suitable patient population for this kind of therapy.

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