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MEMPHIS, Tenn., Nov. 21, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Pam Fansler, whose banking career in Knoxville has spanned more than four decades, will become chairman of First Tennessee Bank’s East Tennessee region as Dave Miller, executive vice president of consumer banking, moves into Fansler’s position as region president.  The changes will take place March 1 as Fansler prepares to retire in July. “Pam Fansler has been the face of First Tennessee in Knoxville for 15 years, and she will continue to provide community leadership, mentoring and business development as she works with Dave Miller on his transition into her former role,” said David Popwell, president of banking for First Tennessee’s parent company, First Horizon National Corp. (NYSE:FHN).  “Pam and I carefully considered which of the talented bankers on our team could best fill the president’s role and carry on the strong First Tennessee traditions in East Tennessee.  Dave Miller was the obvious choice to fill this important position.” During his 22-year career with First Tennessee Miller, 46, has held leadership roles in marketing and corporate strategy and investor relations, where he earned national honors from IR Magazine and Institutional Investor.  As the executive overseeing First Tennessee’s retail, private client and wealth management teams and digital and consumer product strategy, he has been a member of the company’s 15-member Executive Management Committee. Miller has been active in the Memphis community, having served on the boards of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis, United Way, the Better Business Bureau, Families Matter, the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis and the First Tennessee Foundation.  He is a native of Buffalo, N.Y., and earned a degree in physical sciences from Harvard University.  He and his family will complete their move to Knoxville in the next few weeks. Fansler, 64, joined First Tennessee – actually the former Valley Fidelity Bank, which First Tennessee acquired – in 1976.  She was named president of First Tennessee in Knoxville in 2003.  Under her leadership the Knoxville bank has grown deposits by 50 percent, and First Tennessee has been voted Best Bank by readers of the Knoxville News Sentinel for 16 years in a row.  She was named president of the East Tennessee region in 2011. Like Miller, Fansler strongly believes in giving back to the community.  She was the 2011-2012 United Way of Greater Knoxville campaign chair.  She has served on the boards of Covenant Health, the Knoxville Symphony, the Knoxville Area Chamber Partnership, the Central Business Improvement District, Leadership Knoxville, YMCA of East Tennessee, Girl Scouts of Tanasi Council and Friends of Literacy.  She also served as a Knoxville Chancellor’s Associate for the University of Tennessee and a member of the Tennessee Board of Regents. She is a graduate of East Tennessee State University, the Southeastern School of Banking and the LSU Graduate School of Banking and participated in The Wharton School executive development program. About First Tennessee Bank First Tennessee was founded during the Civil War in 1864 and has the 14th oldest national bank charter in the country and one of the highest customer retention rates of any bank in the country. First Tennessee has the largest deposit market share in Tennessee.  The FTB Advisors wealth management group has 313 financial advisors and $25 billion in assets under administration. First Tennessee, FTN Financial and FTB Advisors are part of First Horizon National Corp. (NYSE:FHN), which has 4,300 employees and is headquartered in Memphis, Tenn. First Horizon has been recognized as one of the nation's best employers by Working Mother and American Banker. More information is available at www.FirstTennessee.com.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

YOUNGSVILLE, La., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- RedHawk Holdings Corp. (OTCQB:IDNG) (“RedHawk” or the “Company”) announced today it is expanding its medical device warehousing and administrative offices at the Louisiana State University (“LSU”) Innovation Park (the “LSU Innovation Park”), a 200 plus acre university research park located five miles south of the main LSU campus in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The Company said it hopes to complete the expansion of its innovation center offices by March 31, 2017 to address expected increased domestic and international demand for its medical devices. The Company announced in April 2016 that it had established the RedHawk Innovation Center to have access to LSU researchers, faculty, students, interns, equipment, intellectual property, and the vast network of LSU alumni. Commenting on the expansion of its medical device offices at the LSU Innovation Park, G. Darcy Klug, RedHawk’s Chairman and an LSU alumnus said, “The expansion of our medical device warehousing and administrative offices at the LSU Innovation Park permits the consolidation of our medical device administration, development, testing, warehousing, quality control, manufacturing, assembly and distribution capabilities. This consolidation also allows us to work closer on new product development with the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, the LSU Health Science Center, the Pennington BioTech Initiative, the LSU Emerging Technology Center and more than 44 companies and research institutions located at the LSU Innovation Park.  We are exposed to new medical devices on a regular basis. This expansion and consolidation will allow us to improve our medical device administrative and operating efficiency and it will help increase our focus on new product development. We believe we are now better positioned to capitalize on the various medical device opportunities that are currently being offered to us.” RedHawk Holdings Corp., formerly Independence Energy Corp., is a diversified holding company which, through its subsidiaries, is engaged in sales and distribution of medical devices, sales of branded generic pharmaceutical drugs, commercial real estate investment and leasing, sales of point of entry full-body security systems, and specialized financial services. Through its medical products business unit, the Company sells WoundClot Surgical - Advanced Bleeding Control, the Sharps and Needle Destruction Device, the Carotid Artery Digital Non-Contact Thermometer and Zonis®. Its real estate leasing revenues are generated from various commercial properties under long-term lease. Additionally, RedHawk’s real estate investment unit holds limited liability company interest in various commercial restoration projects in Hawaii. The Company’s financial service revenue is from brokerage services earned in connection with debt placement services. RedHawk Energy holds the exclusive U.S. manufacturing and distribution rights for the Centri Controlled Entry System, a unique, closed cabinet, nominal dose transmission full body x-ray scanner. This release may contain forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are all statements other than statements of historical fact. Statements contained in this release that are not historical facts may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. The words “anticipate,” “may,” “can,” “plans,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “projects,” “targets,” “intends,” “likely,” “will,” “should,” “to be,” “potential” and any similar expressions are intended to identify those assertions as forward-looking statements. Investors are cautioned that forward-looking statements are inherently uncertain. Actual performance and results may differ materially from that projected or suggested herein due to certain risks and uncertainties. In evaluating forward-looking statements, you should consider the various factors which may cause actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statements including those listed in the “Risk Factors” section of our latest 10-K report. Further, the Company may make changes to its business plans that could or will affect its results. Investors are cautioned that the Company will undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

YOUNGSVILLE, La., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- RedHawk Holdings Corp. (OTCQB:IDNG) (“RedHawk” or the “Company”) announced today it is expanding its medical device warehousing and administrative offices at the Louisiana State University (“LSU”) Innovation Park (the “LSU Innovation Park”), a 200 plus acre university research park located five miles south of the main LSU campus in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The Company said it hopes to complete the expansion of its innovation center offices by March 31, 2017 to address expected increased domestic and international demand for its medical devices. The Company announced in April 2016 that it had established the RedHawk Innovation Center to have access to LSU researchers, faculty, students, interns, equipment, intellectual property, and the vast network of LSU alumni. Commenting on the expansion of its medical device offices at the LSU Innovation Park, G. Darcy Klug, RedHawk’s Chairman and an LSU alumnus said, “The expansion of our medical device warehousing and administrative offices at the LSU Innovation Park permits the consolidation of our medical device administration, development, testing, warehousing, quality control, manufacturing, assembly and distribution capabilities. This consolidation also allows us to work closer on new product development with the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, the LSU Health Science Center, the Pennington BioTech Initiative, the LSU Emerging Technology Center and more than 44 companies and research institutions located at the LSU Innovation Park.  We are exposed to new medical devices on a regular basis. This expansion and consolidation will allow us to improve our medical device administrative and operating efficiency and it will help increase our focus on new product development. We believe we are now better positioned to capitalize on the various medical device opportunities that are currently being offered to us.” RedHawk Holdings Corp., formerly Independence Energy Corp., is a diversified holding company which, through its subsidiaries, is engaged in sales and distribution of medical devices, sales of branded generic pharmaceutical drugs, commercial real estate investment and leasing, sales of point of entry full-body security systems, and specialized financial services. Through its medical products business unit, the Company sells WoundClot Surgical - Advanced Bleeding Control, the Sharps and Needle Destruction Device, the Carotid Artery Digital Non-Contact Thermometer and Zonis®. Its real estate leasing revenues are generated from various commercial properties under long-term lease. Additionally, RedHawk’s real estate investment unit holds limited liability company interest in various commercial restoration projects in Hawaii. The Company’s financial service revenue is from brokerage services earned in connection with debt placement services. RedHawk Energy holds the exclusive U.S. manufacturing and distribution rights for the Centri Controlled Entry System, a unique, closed cabinet, nominal dose transmission full body x-ray scanner. This release may contain forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are all statements other than statements of historical fact. Statements contained in this release that are not historical facts may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. The words “anticipate,” “may,” “can,” “plans,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “projects,” “targets,” “intends,” “likely,” “will,” “should,” “to be,” “potential” and any similar expressions are intended to identify those assertions as forward-looking statements. Investors are cautioned that forward-looking statements are inherently uncertain. Actual performance and results may differ materially from that projected or suggested herein due to certain risks and uncertainties. In evaluating forward-looking statements, you should consider the various factors which may cause actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statements including those listed in the “Risk Factors” section of our latest 10-K report. Further, the Company may make changes to its business plans that could or will affect its results. Investors are cautioned that the Company will undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

YOUNGSVILLE, La., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- RedHawk Holdings Corp. (OTCQB:IDNG) (“RedHawk” or the “Company”) announced today it is expanding its medical device warehousing and administrative offices at the Louisiana State University (“LSU”) Innovation Park (the “LSU Innovation Park”), a 200 plus acre university research park located five miles south of the main LSU campus in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The Company said it hopes to complete the expansion of its innovation center offices by March 31, 2017 to address expected increased domestic and international demand for its medical devices. The Company announced in April 2016 that it had established the RedHawk Innovation Center to have access to LSU researchers, faculty, students, interns, equipment, intellectual property, and the vast network of LSU alumni. Commenting on the expansion of its medical device offices at the LSU Innovation Park, G. Darcy Klug, RedHawk’s Chairman and an LSU alumnus said, “The expansion of our medical device warehousing and administrative offices at the LSU Innovation Park permits the consolidation of our medical device administration, development, testing, warehousing, quality control, manufacturing, assembly and distribution capabilities. This consolidation also allows us to work closer on new product development with the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, the LSU Health Science Center, the Pennington BioTech Initiative, the LSU Emerging Technology Center and more than 44 companies and research institutions located at the LSU Innovation Park.  We are exposed to new medical devices on a regular basis. This expansion and consolidation will allow us to improve our medical device administrative and operating efficiency and it will help increase our focus on new product development. We believe we are now better positioned to capitalize on the various medical device opportunities that are currently being offered to us.” RedHawk Holdings Corp., formerly Independence Energy Corp., is a diversified holding company which, through its subsidiaries, is engaged in sales and distribution of medical devices, sales of branded generic pharmaceutical drugs, commercial real estate investment and leasing, sales of point of entry full-body security systems, and specialized financial services. Through its medical products business unit, the Company sells WoundClot Surgical - Advanced Bleeding Control, the Sharps and Needle Destruction Device, the Carotid Artery Digital Non-Contact Thermometer and Zonis®. Its real estate leasing revenues are generated from various commercial properties under long-term lease. Additionally, RedHawk’s real estate investment unit holds limited liability company interest in various commercial restoration projects in Hawaii. The Company’s financial service revenue is from brokerage services earned in connection with debt placement services. RedHawk Energy holds the exclusive U.S. manufacturing and distribution rights for the Centri Controlled Entry System, a unique, closed cabinet, nominal dose transmission full body x-ray scanner. This release may contain forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are all statements other than statements of historical fact. Statements contained in this release that are not historical facts may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. The words “anticipate,” “may,” “can,” “plans,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “projects,” “targets,” “intends,” “likely,” “will,” “should,” “to be,” “potential” and any similar expressions are intended to identify those assertions as forward-looking statements. Investors are cautioned that forward-looking statements are inherently uncertain. Actual performance and results may differ materially from that projected or suggested herein due to certain risks and uncertainties. In evaluating forward-looking statements, you should consider the various factors which may cause actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statements including those listed in the “Risk Factors” section of our latest 10-K report. Further, the Company may make changes to its business plans that could or will affect its results. Investors are cautioned that the Company will undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Pink Petro, the community for women in energy, will gather industry executives, professionals and students on March 8 for the second HERWorld Energy Forum at the Jones Graduate School of Business on the campus of Rice University. The event will be streamed globally with U.S. local events in Denver, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Bakersfield, Wheeling and Puget Sound. Internationally, forums will be held in Kenya, Nigeria, The United Kingdom and parts of Western Europe. Celebrating on International Women's Day, the event begins at 8:00 a.m. and ends at 5:00 p.m. Central Time. The forum is a unique event that addresses new frontiers in the energy industry where business, workforce, innovation and policy intersect. This year's theme is "The Next Era of Energy: Lean In, All In, and Join In." ABC-TV anchor Gina Gaston and Editor-in-Chief of the Houston Business Journal Giselle Greenwood will co-emcee. Katie Mehnert, founder and CEO of Pink Petro, said, "The evidence of dramatic change is all around us, and it’s happening at exponential speed. The global energy industry is entering the dawn of a new era and for the workforce, that's exciting." “Our location in Houston, our eye to the future, and our support of diversity and inclusion make this collaboration with Pink Petro and the business school a natural fit,” said Peter Rodriguez, dean of the Jones Graduate School of Business. “We are thrilled to be a part of it.” Keynotes include Jeffrey Hayzlett, chairman of the C-Suite Network; Josh Levs, author, UN gender advocate and former CNN correspondent; and Johnna Van Keuren, Vice President, Wind Operations and HSSE, New Energies with Royal Dutch Shell. Presenters include Christina Sistrunk, CEO of Aera Energy; Tandra Jackson, Managing Partner of KPMG LLP; Vicky Bailey, chairman of the United States Energy Association; Dr. Mikki Hebl, Martha and Henry Malcolm Lovett Chair of Psychology and professor of management at Rice University; and Nick Candito, Forbes Top 30 under 30 and co-founder of Progressly. The conference will open with Sami Murphy who will sing her original song, "Energy". For a full agenda, speakers, and registration, visit the HERWorld website. HERWorld17 sponsors include the Jones Graduate School of Business at Rice University, KPMG LLP, Shell, GE, Spectra Energy, Marathon Oil, Cabot Oil & Gas Corporation, S&B Engineering and Constructors, Progressly, Workday, Challenger Gray Christmas, Spring Rock Energy, The Golden Tulip Nairobi. Hosts include The University of Colorado Denver Global Energy Management Program and the LSU Center for Energy Studies. Pink Petro is a leading professional development company and online professional community aimed at disrupting the gender gap in energy and defining the future of the workforce and supply chain. Pink Petro™ has members in 120+ countries in 500+ companies across the energy value chain.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Mars' mantle may be more complicated than previously thought. In a new study published today in the Nature-affiliated journal Scientific Reports, researchers at LSU document geochemical changes over time in the lava flows of Elysium, a major martian volcanic province. LSU Geology and Geophysics graduate researcher David Susko led the study with colleagues at LSU including his advisor Suniti Karunatillake, the University of Rahuna in Sri Lanka, the SETI Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, NASA Ames, and the Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie in France. They found that the unusual chemistry of lava flows around Elysium is consistent with primary magmatic processes, such as a heterogeneous mantle beneath Mars' surface or the weight of the overlying volcanic mountain causing different layers of the mantle to melt at different temperatures as they rise to the surface over time. Elysium is a giant volcanic complex on Mars, the second largest behind Olympic Mons. For scale, it rises to twice the height of Earth's Mount Everest, or approximately 16 kilometers. Geologically, however, Elysium is more like Earth's Tibesti Mountains in Chad, the Emi Koussi in particular, than Everest. This comparison is based on images of the region from the Mars Orbiter Camera, or MOC, aboard the Mars Global Surveyor, or MGS, Mission. Elysium is also unique among martian volcanoes. It's isolated in the northern lowlands of the planet, whereas most other volcanic complexes on Mars cluster in the ancient southern highlands. Elysium also has patches of lava flows that are remarkably young for a planet often considered geologically silent. "Most of the volcanic features we look at on Mars are in the range of 3-4 billion years old," Susko said. "There are some patches of lava flows on Elysium that we estimate to be 3-4 million years old, so three orders of magnitude younger. In geologic timescales, 3 million years ago is like yesterday." In fact, Elysium's volcanoes hypothetically could still erupt, Susko said, although further research is needed to confirm this. "At least, we can't yet rule out active volcanoes on Mars," Susko said. "Which is very exciting." Susko's work in particular reveals that the composition of volcanoes on Mars may evolve over their eruptive history. In earlier research led by Karunatillake, assistant professor in LSU's Department of Geology and Geophysics, researchers in LSU's Planetary Science Lab, or PSL, found that particular regions of Elysium and the surrounding shallow subsurface of Mars are geochemically anomalous, strange even relative to other volcanic regions on Mars. They are depleted in the radioactive elements thorium and potassium. Elysium is one of only two igneous provinces on Mars where researchers have found such low levels of these elements so far. "Because thorium and potassium are radioactive, they are some of the most reliable geochemical signatures that we have on Mars," Susko said. "They act like beacons emitting their own gamma photons. These elements also often couple in volcanic settings on Earth." In their new paper, Susko and colleagues started to piece together the geologic history of Elysium, an expansive volcanic region on Mars characterized by strange chemistry. They sought to uncover why some of Elysium's lava flows are so geochemically unusual, or why they have such low levels of thorium and potassium. Is it because, as other researchers have suspected, glaciers located in this region long ago altered the surface chemistry through aqueous processes? Or is it because these lava flows arose from different parts of Mars' mantle than other volcanic eruptions on Mars? Perhaps the mantle has changed over time, meaning that more recent volcanic eruption flows differ chemically from older ones. If so, Susko could use Elysium's geochemical properties to study how Mars' bulk mantle has evolved over geologic time, with important insights for future missions to Mars. Understanding the evolutionary history of Mars' mantle could help researchers gain a better understanding of what kinds of valuable ores and other materials could be found in the crust, as well as whether volcanic hazards could unexpectedly threaten human missions to Mars in the near future. Mars' mantle likely has a very different history than Earth's mantle because the plate tectonics on Earth are absent on Mars as far as researchers know. The history of the bulk interior of the red planet also remains a mystery. Susko and colleagues at LSU analyzed geochemical and surface morphology data from Elysium using instruments on board NASA's Mars Odyssey Orbiter (2001) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (2006). They had to account for the dust that blankets Mars' surface in the aftermath of strong dust storms, to make sure that the shallow subsurface chemistry actually reflected Elysium's igneous material and not the overlying dust. Through crater counting, the researchers found differences in age between the northwest and the southeast regions of Elysium -- about 850 million years of difference. They also found that the younger southeast regions are geochemically different from the older regions, and that these differences in fact relate to igneous processes, not secondary processes like the interaction of water or ice with the surface of Elysium in the past. "We determined that while there might have been water in this area in the past, the geochemical properties in the top meter throughout this volcanic province are indicative of igneous processes," Susko said. "We think levels of thorium and potassium here were depleted over time because of volcanic eruptions over billions of years. The radioactive elements were the first to go in the early eruptions. We are seeing changes in the mantle chemistry over time." "Long-lived volcanic systems with changing magma compositions are common on Earth, but an emerging story on Mars," said James Wray, study co-author and associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Tech. Wray led a 2013 study that showed evidence for magma evolution at a different martian volcano, Syrtis Major, in the form of unusual minerals. But such minerals could be originating at the surface of Mars, and are visible only on rare dust-free volcanoes. "At Elysium we are truly seeing the bulk chemistry change over time, using a technique that could potentially unlock the magmatic history of many more regions across Mars," he said. Susko speculates that the very weight of Elysium's lava flows, which make up a volcanic province six times higher and almost four times wider than its morphological sister on Earth, Emi Koussi, has caused different depths of Mars' mantle to melt at different temperatures. In different regions of Elysium, lava flows may have come from different parts of the mantle. Seeing chemical differences in different regions of Elysium, Susko and colleagues concluded that Mars' mantle might be heterogeneous, with different compositions in different areas, or that it may be stratified beneath Elysium. Overall, Susko's findings indicate that Mars is a much more geologically complex body than originally thought, perhaps due to various loading effects on the mantle caused by the weight of giant volcanoes. "It's more Earth-like than moon-like," Susko said. "The moon is cut and dry. It often lacks the secondary minerals that occur on Earth due to weathering and igneous-water interactions. For decades, that's also how we envisioned Mars, as a lifeless rock, full of craters with a number of long inactive volcanoes. We had a very simple view of the red planet. But the more we look at Mars, the less moon-like it becomes. We're discovering more variety in rock types and geochemical compositions, as seen across the Curiosity Rover's traverse in Gale Crater, and more potential for viable resource utilization and capacity to sustain a human population on Mars. It's much easier to survive on a complex planetary body bearing the mineral products of complex geology than on a simpler body like the moon or asteroids." Susko plans to continue clarifying the geologic processes that cause the strange chemistry found around Elysium. In the future, he will study these chemical anomalies through computational simulations, to determine if recreating the pressures in Mars' mantle caused by the weight of giant volcanoes could affect mantle melting to yield the type of chemistry observed within Elysium. David Susko led the team with LSU undergraduate student Taylor Judice from Lafayette, La., mentored by their advisor Suniti Karunatillake. This multi-institutional and international investigation was co-authored by Gayantha Kodikara at the University of Ruhuna in Sri Lanka; John Roma Skok, SETI Institute; James Wray at Georgia Institute of Technology; Jennifer Heldmann at NASA Ames; and Agnes Cousin at the Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie in France. NASA's Mars Data Analysis Program (MDAP) funded the project at LSU, which used data from several missions, including the 2001 Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) and the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO).


LSU Geology and Geophysics graduate researcher David Susko led the study with colleagues at LSU including his advisor Suniti Karunatillake, the University of Rahuna in Sri Lanka, the SETI Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, NASA Ames, and the Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie in France. They found that the unusual chemistry of lava flows around Elysium is consistent with primary magmatic processes, such as a heterogeneous mantle beneath Mars' surface or the weight of the overlying volcanic mountain causing different layers of the mantle to melt at different temperatures as they rise to the surface over time. Elysium is a giant volcanic complex on Mars, the second largest behind Olympic Mons. For scale, it rises to twice the height of Earth's Mount Everest, or approximately 16 kilometers. Geologically, however, Elysium is more like Earth's Tibesti Mountains in Chad, the Emi Koussi in particular, than Everest. This comparison is based on images of the region from the Mars Orbiter Camera, or MOC, aboard the Mars Global Surveyor, or MGS, Mission. Elysium is also unique among martian volcanoes. It's isolated in the northern lowlands of the planet, whereas most other volcanic complexes on Mars cluster in the ancient southern highlands. Elysium also has patches of lava flows that are remarkably young for a planet often considered geologically silent. "Most of the volcanic features we look at on Mars are in the range of 3-4 billion years old," Susko said. "There are some patches of lava flows on Elysium that we estimate to be 3-4 million years old, so three orders of magnitude younger. In geologic timescales, 3 million years ago is like yesterday." In fact, Elysium's volcanoes hypothetically could still erupt, Susko said, although further research is needed to confirm this. "At least, we can't yet rule out active volcanoes on Mars," Susko said. "Which is very exciting." Susko's work in particular reveals that the composition of volcanoes on Mars may evolve over their eruptive history. In earlier research led by Karunatillake, assistant professor in LSU's Department of Geology and Geophysics, researchers in LSU's Planetary Science Lab, or PSL, found that particular regions of Elysium and the surrounding shallow subsurface of Mars are geochemically anomalous, strange even relative to other volcanic regions on Mars. They are depleted in the radioactive elements thorium and potassium. Elysium is one of only two igneous provinces on Mars where researchers have found such low levels of these elements so far. "Because thorium and potassium are radioactive, they are some of the most reliable geochemical signatures that we have on Mars," Susko said. "They act like beacons emitting their own gamma photons. These elements also often couple in volcanic settings on Earth." In their new paper, Susko and colleagues started to piece together the geologic history of Elysium, an expansive volcanic region on Mars characterized by strange chemistry. They sought to uncover why some of Elysium's lava flows are so geochemically unusual, or why they have such low levels of thorium and potassium. Is it because, as other researchers have suspected, glaciers located in this region long ago altered the surface chemistry through aqueous processes? Or is it because these lava flows arose from different parts of Mars' mantle than other volcanic eruptions on Mars? Perhaps the mantle has changed over time, meaning that more recent volcanic eruption flows differ chemically from older ones. If so, Susko could use Elysium's geochemical properties to study how Mars' bulk mantle has evolved over geologic time, with important insights for future missions to Mars. Understanding the evolutionary history of Mars' mantle could help researchers gain a better understanding of what kinds of valuable ores and other materials could be found in the crust, as well as whether volcanic hazards could unexpectedly threaten human missions to Mars in the near future. Mars' mantle likely has a very different history than Earth's mantle because the plate tectonics on Earth are absent on Mars as far as researchers know. The history of the bulk interior of the red planet also remains a mystery. Susko and colleagues at LSU analyzed geochemical and surface morphology data from Elysium using instruments on board NASA's Mars Odyssey Orbiter (2001) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (2006). They had to account for the dust that blankets Mars' surface in the aftermath of strong dust storms, to make sure that the shallow subsurface chemistry actually reflected Elysium's igneous material and not the overlying dust. Through crater counting, the researchers found differences in age between the northwest and the southeast regions of Elysium—about 850 million years of difference. They also found that the younger southeast regions are geochemically different from the older regions, and that these differences in fact relate to igneous processes, not secondary processes like the interaction of water or ice with the surface of Elysium in the past. "We determined that while there might have been water in this area in the past, the geochemical properties in the top meter throughout this volcanic province are indicative of igneous processes," Susko said. "We think levels of thorium and potassium here were depleted over time because of volcanic eruptions over billions of years. The radioactive elements were the first to go in the early eruptions. We are seeing changes in the mantle chemistry over time." "Long-lived volcanic systems with changing magma compositions are common on Earth, but an emerging story on Mars," said James Wray, study co-author and associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Tech. Wray led a 2013 study that showed evidence for magma evolution at a different martian volcano, Syrtis Major, in the form of unusual minerals. But such minerals could be originating at the surface of Mars, and are visible only on rare dust-free volcanoes. "At Elysium we are truly seeing the bulk chemistry change over time, using a technique that could potentially unlock the magmatic history of many more regions across Mars," he said. Susko speculates that the very weight of Elysium's lava flows, which make up a volcanic province six times higher and almost four times wider than its morphological sister on Earth, Emi Koussi, has caused different depths of Mars' mantle to melt at different temperatures. In different regions of Elysium, lava flows may have come from different parts of the mantle. Seeing chemical differences in different regions of Elysium, Susko and colleagues concluded that Mars' mantle might be heterogeneous, with different compositions in different areas, or that it may be stratified beneath Elysium. Overall, Susko's findings indicate that Mars is a much more geologically complex body than originally thought, perhaps due to various loading effects on the mantle caused by the weight of giant volcanoes. "It's more Earth-like than moon-like," Susko said. "The moon is cut and dry. It often lacks the secondary minerals that occur on Earth due to weathering and igneous-water interactions. For decades, that's also how we envisioned Mars, as a lifeless rock, full of craters with a number of long inactive volcanoes. We had a very simple view of the red planet. But the more we look at Mars, the less moon-like it becomes. We're discovering more variety in rock types and geochemical compositions, as seen across the Curiosity Rover's traverse in Gale Crater, and more potential for viable resource utilization and capacity to sustain a human population on Mars. It's much easier to survive on a complex planetary body bearing the mineral products of complex geology than on a simpler body like the moon or asteroids." Susko plans to continue clarifying the geologic processes that cause the strange chemistry found around Elysium. In the future, he will study these chemical anomalies through computational simulations, to determine if recreating the pressures in Mars' mantle caused by the weight of giant volcanoes could affect mantle melting to yield the type of chemistry observed within Elysium. Explore further: Research finds evidence of 2 billion years of volcanic activity on Mars


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

PLAINVIEW, NY--(Marketwired - February 16, 2017) - NeuLion, Inc. (TSX: NLN), a leading technology product and service provider specializing in the broadcasting, distribution and monetization of live and on-demand digital video content to Internet-enabled devices, and LSU Sports Properties, the official marketing and multimedia rights holder of the LSU Athletics Department, today announced a mobile first relaunch of the official athletics website of Louisiana State University. NeuLion and LSU Sports Properties have been proud partners since 2005 and collaborated on many successful projects, creating a compelling digital destination for Louisiana State University's passionate fan base. As part of the partnership extension, NeuLion and LSU Sports Properties enhanced the official athletics website of Louisiana State University, LSUsports.net. The enhanced site delivers a custom and innovative digital experience for LSU fans. Revamped around a mobile first strategy, LSUsports.net features a responsive and aesthetically modern, clean design to improve mobile experiences. Key features include increased video integration, with LSUsports.net LIVE free for fans and accessible through any device, and an enhanced social media integration to drive engagement and improve overall fan experiences. The NeuLion College Platform, which powers dynamic solutions for over 140 colleges, universities and conferences, combines industry leading content management and product promotion tools with a robust video solution to deliver a service worthy of LSU's ambitions. "One of our main goals with this generation of LSUsports.net is to deliver consistent LSU Athletics branding and messaging across all devices," said Todd Politz, Director of Digital Media at LSU Sports Properties. "Impressions originating from mobile devices have grown to nearly half of the website's traffic. Considering that volume, this responsive redesign of LSUsports.net was essential in helping our fans and visitors access a vast amount of data with ease." "We hope to deliver a mobile experience to Tiger fans that they haven't had in the past. Over the past six months, we've been taking steps to create a better online experience for our fan base. The first step was providing free live-streaming audio and video from more than 240 events each season. This relaunch of LSUsports.net is the next step to give Tigers fans more information at their fingertips than ever before." "We are proud to grow our relationship with an innovative partner such as LSU Sports Properties," said Tim Vargas, Senior Vice President at NeuLion. "LSU is one of the premier athletic departments in the country and together we can deliver a unique and compelling digital experience that matches their goals as an athletic department." NeuLion, Inc. (TSX: NLN) offers solutions that power the highest quality digital experiences for live and on-demand content in up to 4K on any device. Through its end-to-end technology platform, NeuLion enables digital video management, distribution and monetization for content owners worldwide including the NFL, NBA, World Surf League, Univision Deportes, Euroleague Basketball and others. NeuLion powers the entire video ecosystem for content owners and rights holders, consumer electronic companies, and third party video integrators through its MainConcept business. NeuLion's robust consumer electronics licensing business enables its customers like Sony, LG, Samsung and others to stream secure, high-quality video seamlessly across their consumer devices. NeuLion is headquartered in Plainview, NY. For more information about NeuLion, visit www.NeuLion.com. Certain statements herein are forward-looking statements and represent NeuLion's current intentions in respect of future activities. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of the words "will," "expect," "seek," "anticipate," "believe," "plan," "estimate," "expect," and "intend" and statements that an event or result "may," "will," "can," "should," "could," or "might" occur or be achieved and other similar expressions. These statements, in addressing future events and conditions, involve inherent risks and uncertainties. Although the forward-looking statements contained in this release are based upon what management believes to be reasonable assumptions, NeuLion cannot assure readers that actual results will be consistent with these forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are made as of the date of this release and NeuLion assumes no obligation to update or revise them to reflect new events or circumstances, except as required by law. Many factors could cause NeuLion's actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements that may be expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements, including: our ability to derive anticipated benefits from the acquisitions of DivX and Saffron Digital; our ability to realize some or all of the anticipated benefits of our partnerships; general economic and market segment conditions; our customers' subscriber levels and financial health; our ability to pursue and consummate acquisitions in a timely manner; our continued relationships with our customers; our ability to negotiate favorable terms for contract renewals; competitor activity; product capability and acceptance rates; technology changes; regulatory changes; foreign exchange risk; interest rate risk; and credit risk. These factors should be considered carefully and readers should not place undue reliance on the forward-looking statements. A more detailed assessment of the risks that could cause actual results to materially differ from current expectations is contained in the "Risk Factors" section of NeuLion's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015, which is available on www.sec.gov and filed on www.sedar.com.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

An Historic Bank. A Vision Of Growth. Local Leaders Making It Happen. JOHN NICHOLS PROMOTED TO FNBD CEO & CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD FNBD is proud to announce the promotion of John Nichols—formerly FNBD's Regional President of Calcasieu Parish—to CEO & Chairman of the Board. John Nichols stepping into this enhanced leadership position folds nicely into the growth and stability that FNBD is experiencing as it expands its historic Beauregard Parish roots to the highly-active Calcasieu Parish region. John Nichols’ skilled leadership and banking experience bond seamlessly with the FNBD brand, at the same time outlining a fresh vision of prosperity and growth. Nichols joined FNBD in 2014, bringing with him over 36 years of banking experience. While operating as FNBD’s Regional President, he also served as a member of the Board of Directors and Chief Credit Officer. John Nichols' banking experience is rich, working with 30 million-to-300 billion dollar banks, and as CEO of FNBD he will put this diverse experience to work immediately. “FNBD has over 80 years of impressive banking history. Our team will continue to build on that,” says Nichols. "We have a unique banking culture at FNBD, and we have the expertise and capability to serve this growing region. We are service oriented, and with ongoing effort and innovation FNBD will continue to provide the best banking team around. That attracts the best customers. This fusion will make FNBD the best bank in Southwest Louisiana.” John is a graduate of LSU in Commercial Banking, and has received diplomas from Graduate School of Banking at LSU, ABA National Commercial Lending School at the University of Oklahoma, GSBS Shesunoff Masters in Banking, and AIB. Ashley Forman has been promoted to the position of Regional President of Calcasieu Parish. Forman formerly served FNBD as the Branch Manager of the Nelson Road-Lake Charles location and held the title of Vice-President.  Ashley has been a vital player in the establishment, branding, and growth of FNBD in Calcasieu. Ashley Forman joined FNBD in 2014, bringing her 18+ years of banking experience to the historic bank.  She brought with her the knowledge and expertise to develop out FNBD’s cash management services and commercial products that are tailored to fit the needs of each business client, making FNBD known for leading edge technology with superior service.  Ashley introduced FNBD to sophisticated consumer lending products, positioning the bank for continued loan growth.  Ashley's leadership and passion for people make her ideal to serve FNBD in the expanded Calcasieu region.  Forman’s vision for developing talent and team building will help FNBD recruit and cultivate top talent as the bank continues to grow.  Forman specializes in commercial and small business lending, consumer and mortgage lending, and interim construction financing.  She has extensive experience in these areas as well as commercial cash management products, including ACH processing and remote deposit capture. Ashley attended McNeese State University and has additional training and certifications, including her Commercial Lending School Certification from the LBA.  Ashley has formerly served on the SWLA Law Center Board as President and currently serves on the Board of the Sulphur Christian Community Coalition. One of John Nichols first acts as CEO of FNBD was creating the new position of Regional President of Beauregard Parish. This position is now occupied Justin Holt who has been promoted from Chief Lending Officer. Justin Holt joined FNBD in 2008 and has been a highly effective member of the FNBD management conclave. Holt has loaned over $250 million dollars in the SWLA during his tenure at FNBD and strives to provide the best customer service and overall banking experience possible. Holt established the FNBD Secondary Residential Mortgage Department in 2008 and has been recognized nationally as a top producer several years in a row.  Holt will continue to oversee the continued success of this division of the bank. The expanded overview of the new regional position is the perfect fit for Holt. Justin specializes in commercial lending, mortgages and small business lending. He graduated with honors from DeRidder High School and holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Management from McNeese State University.  Holt has completed the Graduate School of Banking at LSU and is currently attending his second year at Stonier Graduate School of Banking Leadership at the University of Pennsylvania. He is an active board member of the Rotary Club and has served as President. Holt has also served the Beauregard Delta Waterfowl Chapter as director/treasurer for the past several years. With John Nichols accepting the position of Chairman of the Board, previous Chairman Ronald Nichols has graciously agreed to continue membership on the Board of Directors. The FNBD Board of Directors asked that Ronald Nichols remain in service, continuing to offer his years of wisdom, experience and guidance.


Matson J.L.,LSU | Kozlowski A.M.,LSU
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders | Year: 2011

Undoubtedly, one of the most frequently studied conditions in the field of mental health today is the autism spectrum disorders (ASD). One of the most controversial topics with respect to this population is the prevalence of this spectrum of disorders. The number of cases has risen dramatically, and various hypotheses have been put forward to explain this phenomenon. Among the most frequently addressed possibilities are expanded diagnostic criteria, more awareness of the disorder, diagnosis at earlier ages, and the recognition that ASD is a lifelong condition. The current paper is a review of the extant literature on this topic. Current status of prevalence research is reviewed and conclusions about the current state of the research are discussed. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

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