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Grow Condos, Inc.  (OTCQB: GRWC), a fully reporting, publicly traded company specialized in cannabis industry-related 'Condo' style real estate and turn-key grow facilities, today seeks to update investors on the recent acquisition closing of Lake Selmac Resort and RV Park, and the development of its evolving strategy in Lake Selma Oregon. After completing the acquisition, the company believes that the Smoke on the Water business presents a unique separate business model and being entirely ripe for a 'roll-up' acquisition play within the RV and Campground industry. Currently, the industry is entirely dominated by a 'Mom and Pop' type business with no tangible exit strategy. The company feels that these establishments can be purchased for 4 to 7 times EBITA, and then converted into culturally themed Cannabis Friendly destinations, creating a greater industry presence with a growing multiple of franchise themed locations. To Read this and more news for Grow Condos, please go to: http://marketnewsupdates.com/news/grwc.html Plans currently underway at the Lake Selma Resort include the development of a territorial conversion to the Native American theme, enhanced with TeePee style accommodations, Yoga and other spiritually enhancing activities throughout the day, and astrology and celestial centered nightly events. Other exclusive features include 'Theater Night on the Water', an event by which visitors will be able to experience movie viewing on a floating screen while enjoying a peaceful night on the lake. Created to capitalize on the country's continually growing level of recreational marijuana acceptance, 'Smoke on the Water' has launched its own roll-up development strategy, and started on a trajectory to duplicate its success. Chief Executive Officer, Wayne Zallen stated: "We believe that we have reached a pinnacle, since the acquisition of Southern Oregon's Lake Selmac Resort and RV Park, where this sector has established sufficient momentum to yield considerable value on its own." Management has concluded that this strategy will support the targeted growth of this division, advancing each sector with a singular focus on the development of a strong foothold in each niche market. Smoke on the Water is now relatively established, and prepared to capitalize on the fragmented RV industry in marijuana friendly territories." According to popular consensus, it has been revealed that relaxed marijuana laws are a powerful motivator for tourists, since technically it's not yet permissible to recreationally smoke in National and State Parks. This has opened a very lucrative niche opportunity for smaller, privately-owned properties that can offer the freedom of experiencing Oregon's strikingly beautiful landscape, while also enabling its visitors to enjoy Oregon's 420 Friendly privileges. Grow Condos, Inc. recently announced the successful acquisition of one of the territory's privately-owned nature rich vacation spots, Lake Selmac Resort and RV Park, situated in the picturesque heart of Southern Oregon. Located just 20 miles south of Grants Pass, Oregon and 2.5 miles east of the Redwood Highway (Hwy. 199) in Selma, Oregon, Lake Selmac Resort. The peaceful exclusive property currently facilitates fishing, swimming, boating, and in addition to RV parking, has tent camping and cabin locations established for accommodation. To view more regarding the property, visit: http://www.lakeselmac.com Shareholders will be kept updated as events In other Industry news and developments: United Cannabis Corp. (OTCQB: CNAB) closed up over 16% on Monday at $1.24 by the market close. United Cannabis Corporation, the creator of Prana Bio Nutrient Medicinals, on 4/20 announced that it is expanding protection of its intellectual properties, and National Stage applications based upon PCT/US2015/056635, and pursuant to the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT), for 'Cannabis Extracts and Methods of Preparing and Using Same' are currently in the process of being filed in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Europe, Eurasia, India, Israel, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, South Africa and South Korea. Solis Tek Inc. (OTCQB: SLTK) closed up over 11% on Monday at $1.91 by the market close. Solis Tek is a vertically integrated technology innovator, developer, manufacturer and distributor, focused on bringing products and solutions to commercial cannabis growers, in both the medical and adult use space in legal markets across the U.S. For nearly a decade, growers have used Solis Tek's digital lighting solutions to increase yield and lower costs and grow better. The Company's customers include retail stores, distributors and commercial growers in the United States and abroad. American Cannabis Company, Inc. (OTCQB: AMMJ) closed up over 6% on Monday, at $0.59554 by the market close. American Cannabis Company, a business-to-business consulting firm and distributor of ancillary products and services to the cannabis industry, in April announced it has secured its first retainer client (the "Client"), in the state of Louisiana. The Client, CB Medical, LLC ("CB Medical"), is a newly formed entity that is one of the applicants for the LSU-sponsored medical marijuana program. LSU has indicated that it will select finalists for live presentations next month, and then it will determine a winner in June 2017. Zoned Properties, Inc. (OTCQX: ZDPY), a strategic real estate development firm, whose primary mission is to identify, develop, and lease sophisticated, safe, and sustainable properties in emerging industries, including the licensed medical marijuana industry, in late March announced one of its subsidiaries, Chino Valley Properties, LLC, has signed an amendment to an existing commercial lease agreement with one of its tenants, in order to expand the leased space at the Chino Valley Cultivation Facility, located in Chino Valley, Ariz., from approximately 25,000 square feet to 35,000 square feet of leased space. DISCLAIMER: MarketNewsUpdates.com (MNU) is a third party publisher and news dissemination service provider, which disseminates electronic information through multiple online media channels. MNU is NOT affiliated in any manner with any company mentioned herein. MNU and its affiliated companies are a news dissemination solutions provider and are NOT a registered broker/dealer/analyst/adviser, holds no investment licenses and may NOT sell, offer to sell or offer to buy any security. MNU's market updates, news alerts and corporate profiles are NOT a solicitation or recommendation to buy, sell or hold securities. The material in this release is intended to be strictly informational and is NEVER to be construed or interpreted as research material. All readers are strongly urged to perform research and due diligence on their own and consult a licensed financial professional before considering any level of investing in stocks. All material included herein is republished content and details which were previously disseminated by the companies mentioned in this release. MNU is not liable for any investment decisions by its readers or subscribers. Investors are cautioned that they may lose all or a portion of their investment when investing in stocks. For current services performed MNU has been compensated two thousand two hundred dollars for news coverage of the current press release issued by Grow Condos, Inc. by the company. MNU HOLDS NO SHARES OF ANY COMPANY NAMED IN THIS RELEASE. This release contains "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended and such forward-looking statements are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. "Forward-looking statements" describe future expectations, plans, results, or strategies and are generally preceded by words such as "may", "future", "plan" or "planned", "will" or "should", "expected," "anticipates", "draft", "eventually" or "projected". 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News Article | March 30, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The craze for making slime in DIY mode, with recipes taken from social media, is exposing children to high risk. An 11-year-old girl in Massachusetts recently received severe burns to her hands while making slime on her own. Kathleen Quinn was making the sticky concoction when her skin started turning hot and tingly. She was working with ingredients such as Elmer's glue, water, and borax to make slime. According to her parents, Kathleen's skin turned bright red. She was taken to the hospital, where doctors said her hands received second- and third-degree burns. The hands are full of blisters, her mother said. "She was like crying in pain, 'My hands hurt, my hands hurt,'" said Kathleen's mother Siobhan Quinn. Making homemade slime has become a wild fad, with children turning to YouTube and other social media for tips on do-it-yourself recipes. "We've seen a variety of slime recipes oozing through cyberspace over the past few weeks," said Newell Brands, the parent company of Elmer's Glue, in a statement. According to Newell Brands, the demand for liquid glue has been going up. In the second half of 2016, sales started soaring and by December, sales had more than doubled. DIY slime comes in many types, such as clear slime, sequin slime, glitter slime, puffy slime, glow-in-the-dark slime, and metallic slime. In most of these gooey concoctions, Elmer's glue is used as the main ingredient. Doctors attribute Kathleen's blisters to prolonged exposure to borax. It is a key ingredient and is toxic too. Borax needs to be handled with care and there must be proper dilution. The schoolgirl is expected to recover fully. But her parents want her condition to be conveyed to people so that other children can stay safe while making slime at home, especially when handling borax. Kathleen has missed school for a week as her hands are bandaged. Her message to other kids is "don't make it, don't play with it." A doctor also wanted kids to exercise more caution on what they mix while making slime. "You just have to really read the packages and know what you're mixing because there are certain things in the home that are just dangerous," said Dr. Megan Hannon, a physician at South Shore Hospital. Parents are now looking for safer methods to make slime and still have fun. James Diaz, of LSU Public Health, explains that there are ways of making slimy goo without putting children's safety at risk. The materials required are glue, contact solution, baking soda, and food coloring. Put 4 ounces of glue in a bowl then add half a tablespoon of baking soda and a tablespoon of contact lens solution. Mix in the preferred food coloring. After mixing, it will thicken out. It can then be placed on a plate for further kneading until it becomes a stretchy product. Diaz tells users to be careful about borax. Borax, when mixed with water, turns into boric acid and it can inflict burns. He said the risk must be taken seriously as third-degree burns may worsen into fourth-degree burns warranting a skin graft. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 30, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this Monday, March 9, 2015, file photo, Buffalo Bills general manager Doug Whaley reacts to a question about the future of the team during a news conference at the Ralph Wilson Media Center in Orchard Park, N.Y. The Buffalo Bills fired Whaley in a move that came a day after the NFL draft, and further solidifies rookie head coach Sean McDermott's control over the team. Team owner Terry Pegula announced the move Sunday, April 30, 2017, saying he reached the decision after a lengthy review of the team. (AP Photo/Gary Wiepert, File) ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. (AP) — Whether it was sitting together in a golf cart watching training camp or sharing dinner and drinks at a nearby restaurant, Bills owner Terry Pegula and general manager Doug Whaley were nearly inseparable last summer. Some nine months later, their professional relationship soured to such an extent that Pegula fired Whaley and his entire scouting staff on Sunday. The decision was reached shortly after the two met at 8 a.m., a day following the NFL draft, and it completed a front-office purge that began with coach Rex Ryan being fired in the final week of last season. Pegula's voice cracked briefly with emotion when discussing the latest move, saying: "There were a few tears around the building, to be honest with you. He's a good guy." But not good enough to keep his job, with Pegula saying he reached the conclusion following a lengthy offseason review. It's a shake-up that further solidifies the influence rookie coach Sean McDermott has gained in the three months since being hired. The 42-year-old detail-oriented defensive specialist has become the voice of the franchise in discussing all team-related topics, including free agency and the draft. Pegula said the timing coincided with the end of the draft, but he declined to detail the reasons why the overhaul was necessary. Nor would Pegula explain his reasoning for showing Whaley the door while praising the collaborative approach that took place between the GM and McDermott in the draft room. "We have certain aspects we need to get a little better in," Pegula said. "(Whaley's) a smart man, but we made the decision. And the reasons remain private to us." Pegula said "things change," when asked why he signed Whaley to a four-year contract extension in January 2016, and then backed him this January after Ryan was fired. Pegula also took the emphasis off McDermott's authority by saying the decision to fire Whaley was made by him and his wife, Kim. The Bills also dismissed player-personnel director Jim Monos and Kelvin Fisher, the team's former amateur scouting director who had previously been demoted to an advisory role. Pegula will immediately begin a GM search and said it was too early to speculate on candidates. He said McDermott would have some input. One possible candidate is Carolina Panthers assistant GM Brandon Beane because of his ties to McDermott, who spent the previous six seasons as the team's defensive coordinator. McDermott on Saturday praised Whaley's role in the draft process but sidestepped questions regarding the GM's job security. The Bills made six picks and swung several trades in addressing immediate and long-term needs. Buffalo opened by acquiring two selections, including a first-rounder next year, in a trade with Kansas City to move back 17 spots and select LSU cornerback Tre'Davious White at 27th. The Bills have now gone through six general managers during their 17-year playoff drought — the longest active streak in North America's four major professional sports. It's the first GM search for the Pegulas, who retained Whaley when they purchased the team in October 2014. Whaley worked up the scouting ranks with the Pittsburgh Steelers, before the Bills hired him as an assistant general manager in 2010. He was groomed to become the GM and took over the job in May 2013 when Buddy Nix stepped down. The Bills' drafting history had been spotty this decade. Of the 35 players Buffalo drafted from 2010-13, only defensive tackle Marcell Dareus and left tackle Cordy Glenn remain on the roster. Whaley has been second-guessed on a number of selections, including the decision to trade two draft picks — including Buffalo's 2015 first-round selection — to Cleveland to move up five spots and pick receiver Sammy Watkins with the fourth selection in the 2014 draft. It was considered a high price to pay in a draft that produced a bounty of top-flight receivers. Whaley acknowledged he took a gamble and suggested his tenure in Buffalo might well be judged on that one move. Both of Pegula's Buffalo-based sports franchises are hitting the reset button. Pegula fired Sabers GM Tim Murray and coach Dan Bylsma 10 days after the NHL season ended two weeks ago. Without going into detail, Pegula said he is close to hiring a general manager. Between the two teams, the Pegulas have now employed a combined seven coaches and three GMs since purchasing the Sabres in February 2011. Pegula chalked up the rate of change as being common in sports, and disputed the notion it reflects poorly on him. "We're going to try to make the best decision we can in the future," Pegula said. "We've made big decisions all our lives." For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL


News Article | May 28, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Chris Dillard, CEO & President for Dillard Properties and Apartment Boy of Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston and San Antonio announced the hiring of a new Executive Director for Apartment Boy in San Antonio, Thomas (Tom) Mitchell of Picayune, Mississippi. Mitchell was at LSU when 9-11 occurred and dropped his plans to go to Tulane Medical School. He joined the Army and had 7 tours of duty seeing action with Special Forces throughout the Middle East and South Korea, achieving the rank of Sergeant First Class, commanding as many as 90 men. He is an expert Mixed Martial Arts and Tactical Operations. Tom received a special award from President George W. Bush for being the first to establish Crisis Communications between the South Korean and United States Military via Satellite. He was injured in combat three times. After leaving the U.S. Army in 2011, Tom owned and managed a Direct TV Business in Oklahoma City which grew to cover the state of Oklahoma before moving to San Antonio to once again enter medical school at UT Health Science Center. Once in school he learned that the loss of his eye in combat would prevent him from becoming a Pediatric Oncologist and Surgeon, so he decided to follow through on his other passion – Real Estate. In the last three years, Tom has helped to pioneer a more efficient way of helping Texans find a new place to live. He now joins forces with Dillard Properties in San Antonio and will help to roll out Apartment Boy’s Red Carpet Service Experience for people looking for Apartments in the San Antonio, Texas area. “I’m excited to join Apartment Boy and Dillard Properties,” Mitchell said. “What they’re doing with automation and how they view the client experience in helping people find the perfect apartment made this a great fit. Plus, we’re not limited in the type of real estate deals we can handle. We can do leasing, commercial, residential or just about anything we want. There’s a lot of freedom here. And our culture is through-the-roof both supportive and challenging.” Mitchell will be tasked with leading the team at Dillard Properties & Apartment Boy in San Antonio, including both recruiting and the extensive Apartment Boy training methodologies. “We look for high character, hard working people who understand the servant leadership model we employ,” said CEO Chris Dillard. “We’re already attracting some of the top people we’ve ever seen in our over four years of growth in Texas,” Dillard finished. Dillard Properties and Apartment Boy started in Dallas, Texas in 2012 and has since grown to operations in Forth Worth, Austin, Houston and San Antonio. Through the Apartment Boy brand, they have more than 100,000 people a year looking for free help in finding an apartment. Through the Dillard Properties brand they handle all facets of new and used home sales and leasing in addition to working in commercial leasing. They have more than 70 real estate agents working and in training and expect to have more than 200 by the end of 2017 with 30 plus employing the Red Carpet Service Experience model in San Antonio alone. For more information, please visit http://apartmentboy.com/


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

YOUNGSVILLE, La., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- RedHawk Holdings Corp. (OTCQB:IDNG) (“RedHawk” or the “Company”) announced today it is expanding its medical device warehousing and administrative offices at the Louisiana State University (“LSU”) Innovation Park (the “LSU Innovation Park”), a 200 plus acre university research park located five miles south of the main LSU campus in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The Company said it hopes to complete the expansion of its innovation center offices by March 31, 2017 to address expected increased domestic and international demand for its medical devices. The Company announced in April 2016 that it had established the RedHawk Innovation Center to have access to LSU researchers, faculty, students, interns, equipment, intellectual property, and the vast network of LSU alumni. Commenting on the expansion of its medical device offices at the LSU Innovation Park, G. Darcy Klug, RedHawk’s Chairman and an LSU alumnus said, “The expansion of our medical device warehousing and administrative offices at the LSU Innovation Park permits the consolidation of our medical device administration, development, testing, warehousing, quality control, manufacturing, assembly and distribution capabilities. This consolidation also allows us to work closer on new product development with the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, the LSU Health Science Center, the Pennington BioTech Initiative, the LSU Emerging Technology Center and more than 44 companies and research institutions located at the LSU Innovation Park.  We are exposed to new medical devices on a regular basis. This expansion and consolidation will allow us to improve our medical device administrative and operating efficiency and it will help increase our focus on new product development. We believe we are now better positioned to capitalize on the various medical device opportunities that are currently being offered to us.” RedHawk Holdings Corp., formerly Independence Energy Corp., is a diversified holding company which, through its subsidiaries, is engaged in sales and distribution of medical devices, sales of branded generic pharmaceutical drugs, commercial real estate investment and leasing, sales of point of entry full-body security systems, and specialized financial services. Through its medical products business unit, the Company sells WoundClot Surgical - Advanced Bleeding Control, the Sharps and Needle Destruction Device, the Carotid Artery Digital Non-Contact Thermometer and Zonis®. Its real estate leasing revenues are generated from various commercial properties under long-term lease. Additionally, RedHawk’s real estate investment unit holds limited liability company interest in various commercial restoration projects in Hawaii. The Company’s financial service revenue is from brokerage services earned in connection with debt placement services. RedHawk Energy holds the exclusive U.S. manufacturing and distribution rights for the Centri Controlled Entry System, a unique, closed cabinet, nominal dose transmission full body x-ray scanner. This release may contain forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are all statements other than statements of historical fact. Statements contained in this release that are not historical facts may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. The words “anticipate,” “may,” “can,” “plans,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “projects,” “targets,” “intends,” “likely,” “will,” “should,” “to be,” “potential” and any similar expressions are intended to identify those assertions as forward-looking statements. Investors are cautioned that forward-looking statements are inherently uncertain. Actual performance and results may differ materially from that projected or suggested herein due to certain risks and uncertainties. In evaluating forward-looking statements, you should consider the various factors which may cause actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statements including those listed in the “Risk Factors” section of our latest 10-K report. Further, the Company may make changes to its business plans that could or will affect its results. Investors are cautioned that the Company will undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Mars' mantle may be more complicated than previously thought. In a new study published today in the Nature-affiliated journal Scientific Reports, researchers at LSU document geochemical changes over time in the lava flows of Elysium, a major martian volcanic province. LSU Geology and Geophysics graduate researcher David Susko led the study with colleagues at LSU including his advisor Suniti Karunatillake, the University of Rahuna in Sri Lanka, the SETI Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, NASA Ames, and the Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie in France. They found that the unusual chemistry of lava flows around Elysium is consistent with primary magmatic processes, such as a heterogeneous mantle beneath Mars' surface or the weight of the overlying volcanic mountain causing different layers of the mantle to melt at different temperatures as they rise to the surface over time. Elysium is a giant volcanic complex on Mars, the second largest behind Olympic Mons. For scale, it rises to twice the height of Earth's Mount Everest, or approximately 16 kilometers. Geologically, however, Elysium is more like Earth's Tibesti Mountains in Chad, the Emi Koussi in particular, than Everest. This comparison is based on images of the region from the Mars Orbiter Camera, or MOC, aboard the Mars Global Surveyor, or MGS, Mission. Elysium is also unique among martian volcanoes. It's isolated in the northern lowlands of the planet, whereas most other volcanic complexes on Mars cluster in the ancient southern highlands. Elysium also has patches of lava flows that are remarkably young for a planet often considered geologically silent. "Most of the volcanic features we look at on Mars are in the range of 3-4 billion years old," Susko said. "There are some patches of lava flows on Elysium that we estimate to be 3-4 million years old, so three orders of magnitude younger. In geologic timescales, 3 million years ago is like yesterday." In fact, Elysium's volcanoes hypothetically could still erupt, Susko said, although further research is needed to confirm this. "At least, we can't yet rule out active volcanoes on Mars," Susko said. "Which is very exciting." Susko's work in particular reveals that the composition of volcanoes on Mars may evolve over their eruptive history. In earlier research led by Karunatillake, assistant professor in LSU's Department of Geology and Geophysics, researchers in LSU's Planetary Science Lab, or PSL, found that particular regions of Elysium and the surrounding shallow subsurface of Mars are geochemically anomalous, strange even relative to other volcanic regions on Mars. They are depleted in the radioactive elements thorium and potassium. Elysium is one of only two igneous provinces on Mars where researchers have found such low levels of these elements so far. "Because thorium and potassium are radioactive, they are some of the most reliable geochemical signatures that we have on Mars," Susko said. "They act like beacons emitting their own gamma photons. These elements also often couple in volcanic settings on Earth." In their new paper, Susko and colleagues started to piece together the geologic history of Elysium, an expansive volcanic region on Mars characterized by strange chemistry. They sought to uncover why some of Elysium's lava flows are so geochemically unusual, or why they have such low levels of thorium and potassium. Is it because, as other researchers have suspected, glaciers located in this region long ago altered the surface chemistry through aqueous processes? Or is it because these lava flows arose from different parts of Mars' mantle than other volcanic eruptions on Mars? Perhaps the mantle has changed over time, meaning that more recent volcanic eruption flows differ chemically from older ones. If so, Susko could use Elysium's geochemical properties to study how Mars' bulk mantle has evolved over geologic time, with important insights for future missions to Mars. Understanding the evolutionary history of Mars' mantle could help researchers gain a better understanding of what kinds of valuable ores and other materials could be found in the crust, as well as whether volcanic hazards could unexpectedly threaten human missions to Mars in the near future. Mars' mantle likely has a very different history than Earth's mantle because the plate tectonics on Earth are absent on Mars as far as researchers know. The history of the bulk interior of the red planet also remains a mystery. Susko and colleagues at LSU analyzed geochemical and surface morphology data from Elysium using instruments on board NASA's Mars Odyssey Orbiter (2001) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (2006). They had to account for the dust that blankets Mars' surface in the aftermath of strong dust storms, to make sure that the shallow subsurface chemistry actually reflected Elysium's igneous material and not the overlying dust. Through crater counting, the researchers found differences in age between the northwest and the southeast regions of Elysium -- about 850 million years of difference. They also found that the younger southeast regions are geochemically different from the older regions, and that these differences in fact relate to igneous processes, not secondary processes like the interaction of water or ice with the surface of Elysium in the past. "We determined that while there might have been water in this area in the past, the geochemical properties in the top meter throughout this volcanic province are indicative of igneous processes," Susko said. "We think levels of thorium and potassium here were depleted over time because of volcanic eruptions over billions of years. The radioactive elements were the first to go in the early eruptions. We are seeing changes in the mantle chemistry over time." "Long-lived volcanic systems with changing magma compositions are common on Earth, but an emerging story on Mars," said James Wray, study co-author and associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Tech. Wray led a 2013 study that showed evidence for magma evolution at a different martian volcano, Syrtis Major, in the form of unusual minerals. But such minerals could be originating at the surface of Mars, and are visible only on rare dust-free volcanoes. "At Elysium we are truly seeing the bulk chemistry change over time, using a technique that could potentially unlock the magmatic history of many more regions across Mars," he said. Susko speculates that the very weight of Elysium's lava flows, which make up a volcanic province six times higher and almost four times wider than its morphological sister on Earth, Emi Koussi, has caused different depths of Mars' mantle to melt at different temperatures. In different regions of Elysium, lava flows may have come from different parts of the mantle. Seeing chemical differences in different regions of Elysium, Susko and colleagues concluded that Mars' mantle might be heterogeneous, with different compositions in different areas, or that it may be stratified beneath Elysium. Overall, Susko's findings indicate that Mars is a much more geologically complex body than originally thought, perhaps due to various loading effects on the mantle caused by the weight of giant volcanoes. "It's more Earth-like than moon-like," Susko said. "The moon is cut and dry. It often lacks the secondary minerals that occur on Earth due to weathering and igneous-water interactions. For decades, that's also how we envisioned Mars, as a lifeless rock, full of craters with a number of long inactive volcanoes. We had a very simple view of the red planet. But the more we look at Mars, the less moon-like it becomes. We're discovering more variety in rock types and geochemical compositions, as seen across the Curiosity Rover's traverse in Gale Crater, and more potential for viable resource utilization and capacity to sustain a human population on Mars. It's much easier to survive on a complex planetary body bearing the mineral products of complex geology than on a simpler body like the moon or asteroids." Susko plans to continue clarifying the geologic processes that cause the strange chemistry found around Elysium. In the future, he will study these chemical anomalies through computational simulations, to determine if recreating the pressures in Mars' mantle caused by the weight of giant volcanoes could affect mantle melting to yield the type of chemistry observed within Elysium. David Susko led the team with LSU undergraduate student Taylor Judice from Lafayette, La., mentored by their advisor Suniti Karunatillake. This multi-institutional and international investigation was co-authored by Gayantha Kodikara at the University of Ruhuna in Sri Lanka; John Roma Skok, SETI Institute; James Wray at Georgia Institute of Technology; Jennifer Heldmann at NASA Ames; and Agnes Cousin at the Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie in France. NASA's Mars Data Analysis Program (MDAP) funded the project at LSU, which used data from several missions, including the 2001 Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) and the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO).


LSU Geology and Geophysics graduate researcher David Susko led the study with colleagues at LSU including his advisor Suniti Karunatillake, the University of Rahuna in Sri Lanka, the SETI Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, NASA Ames, and the Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie in France. They found that the unusual chemistry of lava flows around Elysium is consistent with primary magmatic processes, such as a heterogeneous mantle beneath Mars' surface or the weight of the overlying volcanic mountain causing different layers of the mantle to melt at different temperatures as they rise to the surface over time. Elysium is a giant volcanic complex on Mars, the second largest behind Olympic Mons. For scale, it rises to twice the height of Earth's Mount Everest, or approximately 16 kilometers. Geologically, however, Elysium is more like Earth's Tibesti Mountains in Chad, the Emi Koussi in particular, than Everest. This comparison is based on images of the region from the Mars Orbiter Camera, or MOC, aboard the Mars Global Surveyor, or MGS, Mission. Elysium is also unique among martian volcanoes. It's isolated in the northern lowlands of the planet, whereas most other volcanic complexes on Mars cluster in the ancient southern highlands. Elysium also has patches of lava flows that are remarkably young for a planet often considered geologically silent. "Most of the volcanic features we look at on Mars are in the range of 3-4 billion years old," Susko said. "There are some patches of lava flows on Elysium that we estimate to be 3-4 million years old, so three orders of magnitude younger. In geologic timescales, 3 million years ago is like yesterday." In fact, Elysium's volcanoes hypothetically could still erupt, Susko said, although further research is needed to confirm this. "At least, we can't yet rule out active volcanoes on Mars," Susko said. "Which is very exciting." Susko's work in particular reveals that the composition of volcanoes on Mars may evolve over their eruptive history. In earlier research led by Karunatillake, assistant professor in LSU's Department of Geology and Geophysics, researchers in LSU's Planetary Science Lab, or PSL, found that particular regions of Elysium and the surrounding shallow subsurface of Mars are geochemically anomalous, strange even relative to other volcanic regions on Mars. They are depleted in the radioactive elements thorium and potassium. Elysium is one of only two igneous provinces on Mars where researchers have found such low levels of these elements so far. "Because thorium and potassium are radioactive, they are some of the most reliable geochemical signatures that we have on Mars," Susko said. "They act like beacons emitting their own gamma photons. These elements also often couple in volcanic settings on Earth." In their new paper, Susko and colleagues started to piece together the geologic history of Elysium, an expansive volcanic region on Mars characterized by strange chemistry. They sought to uncover why some of Elysium's lava flows are so geochemically unusual, or why they have such low levels of thorium and potassium. Is it because, as other researchers have suspected, glaciers located in this region long ago altered the surface chemistry through aqueous processes? Or is it because these lava flows arose from different parts of Mars' mantle than other volcanic eruptions on Mars? Perhaps the mantle has changed over time, meaning that more recent volcanic eruption flows differ chemically from older ones. If so, Susko could use Elysium's geochemical properties to study how Mars' bulk mantle has evolved over geologic time, with important insights for future missions to Mars. Understanding the evolutionary history of Mars' mantle could help researchers gain a better understanding of what kinds of valuable ores and other materials could be found in the crust, as well as whether volcanic hazards could unexpectedly threaten human missions to Mars in the near future. Mars' mantle likely has a very different history than Earth's mantle because the plate tectonics on Earth are absent on Mars as far as researchers know. The history of the bulk interior of the red planet also remains a mystery. Susko and colleagues at LSU analyzed geochemical and surface morphology data from Elysium using instruments on board NASA's Mars Odyssey Orbiter (2001) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (2006). They had to account for the dust that blankets Mars' surface in the aftermath of strong dust storms, to make sure that the shallow subsurface chemistry actually reflected Elysium's igneous material and not the overlying dust. Through crater counting, the researchers found differences in age between the northwest and the southeast regions of Elysium—about 850 million years of difference. They also found that the younger southeast regions are geochemically different from the older regions, and that these differences in fact relate to igneous processes, not secondary processes like the interaction of water or ice with the surface of Elysium in the past. "We determined that while there might have been water in this area in the past, the geochemical properties in the top meter throughout this volcanic province are indicative of igneous processes," Susko said. "We think levels of thorium and potassium here were depleted over time because of volcanic eruptions over billions of years. The radioactive elements were the first to go in the early eruptions. We are seeing changes in the mantle chemistry over time." "Long-lived volcanic systems with changing magma compositions are common on Earth, but an emerging story on Mars," said James Wray, study co-author and associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Tech. Wray led a 2013 study that showed evidence for magma evolution at a different martian volcano, Syrtis Major, in the form of unusual minerals. But such minerals could be originating at the surface of Mars, and are visible only on rare dust-free volcanoes. "At Elysium we are truly seeing the bulk chemistry change over time, using a technique that could potentially unlock the magmatic history of many more regions across Mars," he said. Susko speculates that the very weight of Elysium's lava flows, which make up a volcanic province six times higher and almost four times wider than its morphological sister on Earth, Emi Koussi, has caused different depths of Mars' mantle to melt at different temperatures. In different regions of Elysium, lava flows may have come from different parts of the mantle. Seeing chemical differences in different regions of Elysium, Susko and colleagues concluded that Mars' mantle might be heterogeneous, with different compositions in different areas, or that it may be stratified beneath Elysium. Overall, Susko's findings indicate that Mars is a much more geologically complex body than originally thought, perhaps due to various loading effects on the mantle caused by the weight of giant volcanoes. "It's more Earth-like than moon-like," Susko said. "The moon is cut and dry. It often lacks the secondary minerals that occur on Earth due to weathering and igneous-water interactions. For decades, that's also how we envisioned Mars, as a lifeless rock, full of craters with a number of long inactive volcanoes. We had a very simple view of the red planet. But the more we look at Mars, the less moon-like it becomes. We're discovering more variety in rock types and geochemical compositions, as seen across the Curiosity Rover's traverse in Gale Crater, and more potential for viable resource utilization and capacity to sustain a human population on Mars. It's much easier to survive on a complex planetary body bearing the mineral products of complex geology than on a simpler body like the moon or asteroids." Susko plans to continue clarifying the geologic processes that cause the strange chemistry found around Elysium. In the future, he will study these chemical anomalies through computational simulations, to determine if recreating the pressures in Mars' mantle caused by the weight of giant volcanoes could affect mantle melting to yield the type of chemistry observed within Elysium. Explore further: Research finds evidence of 2 billion years of volcanic activity on Mars


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Pink Petro, the community for women in energy, will gather industry executives, professionals and students on March 8 for the second HERWorld Energy Forum at the Jones Graduate School of Business on the campus of Rice University. The event will be streamed globally with U.S. local events in Denver, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Bakersfield, Wheeling and Puget Sound. Internationally, forums will be held in Kenya, Nigeria, The United Kingdom and parts of Western Europe. Celebrating on International Women's Day, the event begins at 8:00 a.m. and ends at 5:00 p.m. Central Time. The forum is a unique event that addresses new frontiers in the energy industry where business, workforce, innovation and policy intersect. This year's theme is "The Next Era of Energy: Lean In, All In, and Join In." ABC-TV anchor Gina Gaston and Editor-in-Chief of the Houston Business Journal Giselle Greenwood will co-emcee. Katie Mehnert, founder and CEO of Pink Petro, said, "The evidence of dramatic change is all around us, and it’s happening at exponential speed. The global energy industry is entering the dawn of a new era and for the workforce, that's exciting." “Our location in Houston, our eye to the future, and our support of diversity and inclusion make this collaboration with Pink Petro and the business school a natural fit,” said Peter Rodriguez, dean of the Jones Graduate School of Business. “We are thrilled to be a part of it.” Keynotes include Jeffrey Hayzlett, chairman of the C-Suite Network; Josh Levs, author, UN gender advocate and former CNN correspondent; and Johnna Van Keuren, Vice President, Wind Operations and HSSE, New Energies with Royal Dutch Shell. Presenters include Christina Sistrunk, CEO of Aera Energy; Tandra Jackson, Managing Partner of KPMG LLP; Vicky Bailey, chairman of the United States Energy Association; Dr. Mikki Hebl, Martha and Henry Malcolm Lovett Chair of Psychology and professor of management at Rice University; and Nick Candito, Forbes Top 30 under 30 and co-founder of Progressly. The conference will open with Sami Murphy who will sing her original song, "Energy". For a full agenda, speakers, and registration, visit the HERWorld website. HERWorld17 sponsors include the Jones Graduate School of Business at Rice University, KPMG LLP, Shell, GE, Spectra Energy, Marathon Oil, Cabot Oil & Gas Corporation, S&B Engineering and Constructors, Progressly, Workday, Challenger Gray Christmas, Spring Rock Energy, The Golden Tulip Nairobi. Hosts include The University of Colorado Denver Global Energy Management Program and the LSU Center for Energy Studies. Pink Petro is a leading professional development company and online professional community aimed at disrupting the gender gap in energy and defining the future of the workforce and supply chain. Pink Petro™ has members in 120+ countries in 500+ companies across the energy value chain.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

PLAINVIEW, NY--(Marketwired - February 16, 2017) - NeuLion, Inc. (TSX: NLN), a leading technology product and service provider specializing in the broadcasting, distribution and monetization of live and on-demand digital video content to Internet-enabled devices, and LSU Sports Properties, the official marketing and multimedia rights holder of the LSU Athletics Department, today announced a mobile first relaunch of the official athletics website of Louisiana State University. NeuLion and LSU Sports Properties have been proud partners since 2005 and collaborated on many successful projects, creating a compelling digital destination for Louisiana State University's passionate fan base. As part of the partnership extension, NeuLion and LSU Sports Properties enhanced the official athletics website of Louisiana State University, LSUsports.net. The enhanced site delivers a custom and innovative digital experience for LSU fans. Revamped around a mobile first strategy, LSUsports.net features a responsive and aesthetically modern, clean design to improve mobile experiences. Key features include increased video integration, with LSUsports.net LIVE free for fans and accessible through any device, and an enhanced social media integration to drive engagement and improve overall fan experiences. The NeuLion College Platform, which powers dynamic solutions for over 140 colleges, universities and conferences, combines industry leading content management and product promotion tools with a robust video solution to deliver a service worthy of LSU's ambitions. "One of our main goals with this generation of LSUsports.net is to deliver consistent LSU Athletics branding and messaging across all devices," said Todd Politz, Director of Digital Media at LSU Sports Properties. "Impressions originating from mobile devices have grown to nearly half of the website's traffic. Considering that volume, this responsive redesign of LSUsports.net was essential in helping our fans and visitors access a vast amount of data with ease." "We hope to deliver a mobile experience to Tiger fans that they haven't had in the past. Over the past six months, we've been taking steps to create a better online experience for our fan base. The first step was providing free live-streaming audio and video from more than 240 events each season. This relaunch of LSUsports.net is the next step to give Tigers fans more information at their fingertips than ever before." "We are proud to grow our relationship with an innovative partner such as LSU Sports Properties," said Tim Vargas, Senior Vice President at NeuLion. "LSU is one of the premier athletic departments in the country and together we can deliver a unique and compelling digital experience that matches their goals as an athletic department." NeuLion, Inc. (TSX: NLN) offers solutions that power the highest quality digital experiences for live and on-demand content in up to 4K on any device. Through its end-to-end technology platform, NeuLion enables digital video management, distribution and monetization for content owners worldwide including the NFL, NBA, World Surf League, Univision Deportes, Euroleague Basketball and others. NeuLion powers the entire video ecosystem for content owners and rights holders, consumer electronic companies, and third party video integrators through its MainConcept business. NeuLion's robust consumer electronics licensing business enables its customers like Sony, LG, Samsung and others to stream secure, high-quality video seamlessly across their consumer devices. NeuLion is headquartered in Plainview, NY. For more information about NeuLion, visit www.NeuLion.com. Certain statements herein are forward-looking statements and represent NeuLion's current intentions in respect of future activities. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of the words "will," "expect," "seek," "anticipate," "believe," "plan," "estimate," "expect," and "intend" and statements that an event or result "may," "will," "can," "should," "could," or "might" occur or be achieved and other similar expressions. These statements, in addressing future events and conditions, involve inherent risks and uncertainties. Although the forward-looking statements contained in this release are based upon what management believes to be reasonable assumptions, NeuLion cannot assure readers that actual results will be consistent with these forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are made as of the date of this release and NeuLion assumes no obligation to update or revise them to reflect new events or circumstances, except as required by law. Many factors could cause NeuLion's actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements that may be expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements, including: our ability to derive anticipated benefits from the acquisitions of DivX and Saffron Digital; our ability to realize some or all of the anticipated benefits of our partnerships; general economic and market segment conditions; our customers' subscriber levels and financial health; our ability to pursue and consummate acquisitions in a timely manner; our continued relationships with our customers; our ability to negotiate favorable terms for contract renewals; competitor activity; product capability and acceptance rates; technology changes; regulatory changes; foreign exchange risk; interest rate risk; and credit risk. These factors should be considered carefully and readers should not place undue reliance on the forward-looking statements. A more detailed assessment of the risks that could cause actual results to materially differ from current expectations is contained in the "Risk Factors" section of NeuLion's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015, which is available on www.sec.gov and filed on www.sedar.com.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

An Historic Bank. A Vision Of Growth. Local Leaders Making It Happen. JOHN NICHOLS PROMOTED TO FNBD CEO & CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD FNBD is proud to announce the promotion of John Nichols—formerly FNBD's Regional President of Calcasieu Parish—to CEO & Chairman of the Board. John Nichols stepping into this enhanced leadership position folds nicely into the growth and stability that FNBD is experiencing as it expands its historic Beauregard Parish roots to the highly-active Calcasieu Parish region. John Nichols’ skilled leadership and banking experience bond seamlessly with the FNBD brand, at the same time outlining a fresh vision of prosperity and growth. Nichols joined FNBD in 2014, bringing with him over 36 years of banking experience. While operating as FNBD’s Regional President, he also served as a member of the Board of Directors and Chief Credit Officer. John Nichols' banking experience is rich, working with 30 million-to-300 billion dollar banks, and as CEO of FNBD he will put this diverse experience to work immediately. “FNBD has over 80 years of impressive banking history. Our team will continue to build on that,” says Nichols. "We have a unique banking culture at FNBD, and we have the expertise and capability to serve this growing region. We are service oriented, and with ongoing effort and innovation FNBD will continue to provide the best banking team around. That attracts the best customers. This fusion will make FNBD the best bank in Southwest Louisiana.” John is a graduate of LSU in Commercial Banking, and has received diplomas from Graduate School of Banking at LSU, ABA National Commercial Lending School at the University of Oklahoma, GSBS Shesunoff Masters in Banking, and AIB. Ashley Forman has been promoted to the position of Regional President of Calcasieu Parish. Forman formerly served FNBD as the Branch Manager of the Nelson Road-Lake Charles location and held the title of Vice-President.  Ashley has been a vital player in the establishment, branding, and growth of FNBD in Calcasieu. Ashley Forman joined FNBD in 2014, bringing her 18+ years of banking experience to the historic bank.  She brought with her the knowledge and expertise to develop out FNBD’s cash management services and commercial products that are tailored to fit the needs of each business client, making FNBD known for leading edge technology with superior service.  Ashley introduced FNBD to sophisticated consumer lending products, positioning the bank for continued loan growth.  Ashley's leadership and passion for people make her ideal to serve FNBD in the expanded Calcasieu region.  Forman’s vision for developing talent and team building will help FNBD recruit and cultivate top talent as the bank continues to grow.  Forman specializes in commercial and small business lending, consumer and mortgage lending, and interim construction financing.  She has extensive experience in these areas as well as commercial cash management products, including ACH processing and remote deposit capture. Ashley attended McNeese State University and has additional training and certifications, including her Commercial Lending School Certification from the LBA.  Ashley has formerly served on the SWLA Law Center Board as President and currently serves on the Board of the Sulphur Christian Community Coalition. One of John Nichols first acts as CEO of FNBD was creating the new position of Regional President of Beauregard Parish. This position is now occupied Justin Holt who has been promoted from Chief Lending Officer. Justin Holt joined FNBD in 2008 and has been a highly effective member of the FNBD management conclave. Holt has loaned over $250 million dollars in the SWLA during his tenure at FNBD and strives to provide the best customer service and overall banking experience possible. Holt established the FNBD Secondary Residential Mortgage Department in 2008 and has been recognized nationally as a top producer several years in a row.  Holt will continue to oversee the continued success of this division of the bank. The expanded overview of the new regional position is the perfect fit for Holt. Justin specializes in commercial lending, mortgages and small business lending. He graduated with honors from DeRidder High School and holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Management from McNeese State University.  Holt has completed the Graduate School of Banking at LSU and is currently attending his second year at Stonier Graduate School of Banking Leadership at the University of Pennsylvania. He is an active board member of the Rotary Club and has served as President. Holt has also served the Beauregard Delta Waterfowl Chapter as director/treasurer for the past several years. With John Nichols accepting the position of Chairman of the Board, previous Chairman Ronald Nichols has graciously agreed to continue membership on the Board of Directors. The FNBD Board of Directors asked that Ronald Nichols remain in service, continuing to offer his years of wisdom, experience and guidance.

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