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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

BEIJING--(BUSINESS WIRE)--cippe 2017 (the 17th China International Petroleum & Petrochemical Technology and Equipment Exhibition) will be held on March 20-22, 2017 at New China International Exhibition Center in Beijing. With an exhibition area of 100,000m2, the event will gather around 2,000 exhibitors from 65 countries and regions, including 50 Fortune Global 500 companies and 18 international pavilions, to display the latest cutting-edge petrochemical and equipment technologies and products. cippe is an approved member of the Global Association of the Exhibition Industry (UFI) and enjoys the support of China’s Ministry of Commerce. This year as the petroleum industry is setting to revive, cippe will present a more professional, valuable and wonderful event for the industry players. In 2017, apart from the existing Oil Exploration & Development, Offshore Oil & Gas, Offshore Engineering, Oil & Gas Pipeline, Shale Gas, Natural Gas and Explosion-proof Equipment zones, the event will add professional exhibition zones for more market segments, including Valves, Fire Control, Oilfield & Land Conservation, in a bid to build a more precise and professional matching platform for buyers. So far, companies that have confirmed to attend include Caterpillar, NOV, Schlumberger, GE, Honeywell, DOW Chemical, Rockwell, Transneft, Rosneft, Akzo, API, 3M, E+H, MTU, Hempel, CNPC, Sinopec, CNOOC, CSSC, CSIC, CASC, Jereh, Kerui, RG Petro-Machinery, Sany Heavy Industry, Northern Heavy Industries Group, CITIC Pacific, HBP, Jerrywon, LandOcean Energy, Anton Oilfield, Shanghai Shenkai, Tiehu Petromachinery, Tidfore, CNOOC, DS Group and Warom Technology. Building professional forums to help insiders look into the future cippe 2017 will continue to hold the 9th International Petroleum Summit highlighting low-cost development, which will analyze industry prospects and policies to come up with feasible practices and technologies. Multiple other technology seminars and symposiums will be held concurrently. During cippe 2017, the organizer Zhenwei Expo will partner with Xi'an Shiyou University and Shanxi Petroleum Society to hold the 2017 International Petroleum & Petrochemical Technology Conference, covering the full industry chain including offshore petroleum exploration, drilling and producing engineering, oil & gas storage and transportation, etc. Besides, cippe will launch the Middle East session by cooperating with Petroleum Association of Middle East (PAME) and Business Gateways International. LLC., (BGI) of Oman. While BGI Oman will introduce in details about its Joint Supplier Registration System (JSRS) to facilitate Chinese petroleum companies to enter Omanis market, PAME will elaborate on the opportunities, challenges and strategies in the Middle Eastern market. cippe 2017 will attract over 100 buyer and visitor delegations comprised of government institutions, industry associations and companies. Rosneft, Gazprom, Transneft, Saudi Aramco, Statoil, NIOC, INOC, Qatargas, Saudi Aramco, Emirates National Oil, Petronas, KNPC, PDVSA, EVOLEN, PAME, DNV, and other industry associations from the Netherlands, India and France.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The technology, patented by CSIC, is also being applied in the early detection of some types of cancer In addition, the total test time is 4 hours, 45 minutes, meaning clinical results could be obtained on the same day. The research is published today in the journal PLOS ONE. The biosensor combines micromechanical silicon structures with gold nanoparticles, both functionalised with p24-specific antibodies. At the end of the immunoassay procedure, p24 is sandwiched between the gold nanoparticles and the micromechanical silicon structures. The gold nanoparticles have optical resonances known as plasmons. These are capable of scattering light very efficiently and have become one of the structures to attract most interest in the field of optics over the last decade. Micromechanical structures are excellent mechanical sensors capable of detecting interactions as small as intermolecular forces. The combination of these two structures produces both mechanical and optical signals which amplify one another, producing remarkable sensitivity, to detect the p24. The technology, which has been patented by CSIC, is also being applied in the early detection of certain types of cancer. "The chip itself, the physical part, is identical for HIV tests and for cancer biomarker tests. What changes is the chemical part- the solution we apply- so that it reacts accordingly to what we are looking for. That's why our fundamental work is focused on developing applications for this new technology", points out CSIC researcher Javier Tamayo, who works at the Institute of Microelectronics in Madrid. "The biosensor uses structures which are manufactured using well-established microelectronics technology, thus making large scale, low cost production possible. This, combined with its simplicity, could make it a great choice for use in developing countries", notes Tamayo. The experiment begins by incubating one millilitre of human serum on the sensor for one hour at 37 °C to allow binding of any existing HIV-1 p24 antigens to the capture antibodies located on the sensor's surface. Next, it is re-incubated at 37 °C, though in this case with gold nanoparticles, for 15 minutes so the captured p24 proteins can be marked. Finally, the resulting material is rinsed to remove any unbound particles. "The test takes a total of 4 hours 45 minutes, which is really rapid. In fact, to confirm the diagnosis you could even repeat the test and the clinical results could be back on the same day as the medical examination. The results are statistically significant and could be adapted to medical requirements", explains the CSIC researcher. Acute human immunodeficiency virus infection is defined as the time from virus acquisition to seroconversion, i.e. the onset of detectable antibodies to HIV in the blood.Today there are two ways to detect HIV in the blood. Firstly, infection can be diagnosed by detecting viral RNA in the blood using nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT), and secondly by detecting p24 protein with fourth generation immunoassays. The first method, based on detecting viral RNA in the blood, has a detection limit of 20 to 35 copies of RNA per millilitre, i.e. a concentration typically occurring two weeks after HIV acquisition. In the second method, during the fourth generation immunoassays, a detection threshold of p24 in 10 picograms per millilitre is reached. This occurs approximately three to four weeks after infection. "This new technology is capable of detecting p24 at concentrations up to 100,000 times lower than the previous generation of approved immunoassays methods and 100 times lower than methods for detecting viral RNA in blood. This reduces the undetectable phase after infection to just one week", says CSIC researcher Priscila Kosaka from Madrid's Institute of Microelectronics. The period between infection and seroconversion is approximately four weeks. The early detection of HIV is crucial to improving a person's health. Progressive changes occur after HIV acquisition, such as irreversible depletion of gut CD4 lymphocytes, replication in the central nervous system, and the establishment of latent HIV reservoirs. "The potential for HIV infectivity in the first stage of infection is much higher than in the later stages. Therefore, initiating antiretroviral therapy prior to seroconversion improves immune control and has been associated with benefits in CD4 cell count, a reduction in systemic inflammation, the preservation of cognitive function, and a reduction of the latent reservoir. Logically, its detection is critical to the prevention of HIV transmission", explains Kosaka. Patented by CSIC, this technology has been licensed to the Mecwins company (a CSIC spin-off) created in 2008 by Javier Tamayo and Montserrat Calleja, and current owner of three patents which represent the fruit of the CSIC researchers' labour. This recent research has received funding from the Spanish Cancer Association. Priscila M. Kosaka, Valerio Pini, Montserrat Calleja and Javier Tamayo. Ultrasensitive detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen by a hybrid nanomechanical-optoplasmonic platform with potential for detecting HIV-1 at first week after infection. PLOS ONE. Kosaka, P. M.; Pini, V.; Ruz, J.; Da Silva, R.; González, M.; Ramos, D.; Calleja, M.; Tamayo, J., Detection of cancer biomarkers in serum using a hybrid mechanical and optoplasmonic nanosensor. Nature Nanotechnology 2014, 9 (12), 1047-1053.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

The biosensor combines micromechanical silicon structures with gold nanoparticles, both functionalized with p24-specific antibodies. At the end of the immunoassay procedure, p24 is sandwiched between the gold nanoparticles and the micromechanical silicon structures. The gold nanoparticles have optical resonances known as plasmons. These are capable of scattering light very efficiently and have become one of the structures to attract most interest in the field of optics over the last decade. Micromechanical structures are excellent mechanical sensors capable of detecting interactions as small as intermolecular forces. The combination of these two structures produces both mechanical and optical signals which amplify one another, producing remarkable sensitivity, to detect the p24. The technology, which has been patented by CSIC, is also being applied in the early detection of certain types of cancer. In addition, the total test time is 4 hours, 45 minutes, meaning clinical results could be obtained on the same day. The research is published today in the journal PLOS ONE. "The chip itself, the physical part, is identical for HIV tests and for cancer biomarker tests. What changes is the chemical part- the solution we apply- so that it reacts accordingly to what we are looking for. That's why our fundamental work is focused on developing applications for this new technology," says CSIC researcher Javier Tamayo, who works at the Institute of Microelectronics in Madrid. "The biosensor uses structures which are manufactured using well-established microelectronics technology, thus making large scale, low cost production possible. This, combined with its simplicity, could make it a great choice for use in developing countries,” notes Tamayo. The experiment begins by incubating 1 mL of human serum on the sensor for one hour at 37 °C to allow binding of any existing HIV-1 p24 antigens to the capture antibodies located on the sensor's surface. Next, it is re-incubated at 37 °C, though in this case with gold nanoparticles, for 15 minutes so the captured p24 proteins can be marked. Finally, the resulting material is rinsed to remove any unbound particles. "The test takes a total of 4 hours 45 minutes, which is really rapid. In fact, to confirm the diagnosis you could even repeat the test and the clinical results could be back on the same day as the medical examination. The results are statistically significant and could be adapted to medical requirements," explains Tamayo. Acute human immunodeficiency virus infection is defined as the time from virus acquisition to seroconversion, i.e. the onset of detectable antibodies to HIV in the blood. Today there are two ways to detect HIV in the blood. Firstly, infection can be diagnosed by detecting viral RNA in the blood using nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT), and secondly by detecting p24 protein with fourth generation immunoassays. The first method, based on detecting viral RNA in the blood, has a detection limit of 20 to 35 copies of RNA per mL, i.e. a concentration typically occurring two weeks after HIV acquisition. In the second method, during the fourth generation immunoassays, a detection threshold of p24 in 10 picograms per mL is reached. This occurs approximately three to four weeks after infection. "This new technology is capable of detecting p24 at concentrations up to 100,000 times lower than the previous generation of approved immunoassays methods and 100 times lower than methods for detecting viral RNA in blood. This reduces the undetectable phase after infection to just one week," says CSIC researcher Priscila Kosaka from Madrid's Institute of Microelectronics. The period between infection and seroconversion is approximately four weeks. The early detection of HIV is crucial to improving a person's health. Progressive changes occur after HIV acquisition, such as irreversible depletion of gut CD4 lymphocytes, replication in the central nervous system, and the establishment of latent HIV reservoirs. "The potential for HIV infectivity in the first stage of infection is much higher than in the later stages. Therefore, initiating antiretroviral therapy prior to seroconversion improves immune control and has been associated with benefits in CD4 cell count, a reduction in systemic inflammation, the preservation of cognitive function, and a reduction of the latent reservoir. Logically, its detection is critical to the prevention of HIV transmission," explains Kosaka.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

In addition, the total test time is 4 hours, 45 minutes, meaning clinical results could be obtained on the same day. The research is published today in the journal PLOS ONE. The biosensor combines micromechanical silicon structures with gold nanoparticles, both functionalised with p24-specific antibodies. At the end of the immunoassay procedure, p24 is sandwiched between the gold nanoparticles and the micromechanical silicon structures. The gold nanoparticles have optical resonances known as plasmons. These are capable of scattering light very efficiently and have become one of the structures to attract most interest in the field of optics over the last decade. Micromechanical structures are excellent mechanical sensors capable of detecting interactions as small as intermolecular forces. The combination of these two structures produces both mechanical and optical signals which amplify one another, producing remarkable sensitivity, to detect the p24. The technology, which has been patented by CSIC, is also being applied in the early detection of certain types of cancer. "The chip itself, the physical part, is identical for HIV tests and for cancer biomarker tests. What changes is the chemical part- the solution we apply- so that it reacts accordingly to what we are looking for. That's why our fundamental work is focused on developing applications for this new technology", points out CSIC researcher Javier Tamayo, who works at the Institute of Microelectronics in Madrid. "The biosensor uses structures which are manufactured using well-established microelectronics technology, thus making large scale, low cost production possible. This, combined with its simplicity, could make it a great choice for use in developing countries", notes Tamayo. The experiment begins by incubating one millilitre of human serum on the sensor for one hour at 37 °C to allow binding of any existing HIV-1 p24 antigens to the capture antibodies located on the sensor's surface. Next, it is re-incubated at 37 °C, though in this case with gold nanoparticles, for 15 minutes so the captured p24 proteins can be marked. Finally, the resulting material is rinsed to remove any unbound particles. "The test takes a total of 4 hours 45 minutes, which is really rapid. In fact, to confirm the diagnosis you could even repeat the test and the clinical results could be back on the same day as the medical examination. The results are statistically significant and could be adapted to medical requirements", explains the CSIC researcher. Acute human immunodeficiency virus infection is defined as the time from virus acquisition to seroconversion, i.e. the onset of detectable antibodies to HIV in the blood.Today there are two ways to detect HIV in the blood. Firstly, infection can be diagnosed by detecting viral RNA in the blood using nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT), and secondly by detecting p24 protein with fourth generation immunoassays. The first method, based on detecting viral RNA in the blood, has a detection limit of 20 to 35 copies of RNA per millilitre, i.e. a concentration typically occurring two weeks after HIV acquisition. In the second method, during the fourth generation immunoassays, a detection threshold of p24 in 10 picograms per millilitre is reached. This occurs approximately three to four weeks after infection. "This new technology is capable of detecting p24 at concentrations up to 100,000 times lower than the previous generation of approved immunoassays methods and 100 times lower than methods for detecting viral RNA in blood. This reduces the undetectable phase after infection to just one week", says CSIC researcher Priscila Kosaka from Madrid's Institute of Microelectronics. The period between infection and seroconversion is approximately four weeks. The early detection of HIV is crucial to improving a person's health. Progressive changes occur after HIV acquisition, such as irreversible depletion of gut CD4 lymphocytes, replication in the central nervous system, and the establishment of latent HIV reservoirs. "The potential for HIV infectivity in the first stage of infection is much higher than in the later stages. Therefore, initiating antiretroviral therapy prior to seroconversion improves immune control and has been associated with benefits in CD4 cell count, a reduction in systemic inflammation, the preservation of cognitive function, and a reduction of the latent reservoir. Logically, its detection is critical to the prevention of HIV transmission", explains Kosaka. Patented by CSIC, this technology has been licensed to the Mecwins company (a CSIC spin-off) created in 2008 by Javier Tamayo and Montserrat Calleja, and current owner of three patents which represent the fruit of the CSIC researchers' labour. This recent research has received funding from the Spanish Cancer Association. Priscila M. Kosaka, Valerio Pini, Montserrat Calleja and Javier Tamayo. Ultrasensitive detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen by a hybrid nanomechanical-optoplasmonic platform with potential for detecting HIV-1 at first week after infection. PLOS ONE.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Obesity, or a high fat diet, can lead to changes in the immune system similar to those observed with aging. That's what research published this week in Experimental Physiology suggests. The research was carried out by scientists at Liverpool John Moores University in the United Kingdom and the Institute of Food Science, Technology and Nutrition of the Spanish National Research Council (ICTAN-CSIC), the University Complutense of Madrid and the Research Institute of the Hospital 12 de Octubre, in Spain. These findings are useful as they help scientists understand the impact of obesity on our body's ability to fight infection. They also found that it was possible to reverse some of these effects by supplementing the diet with unsaturated fatty acids found in vegetable oils, such as olive or fish oils. Obesity affects one in four adults in the UK and can lead to a number of serious and potentially life-threatening conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, some types of cancer, and stroke1. The researchers fed mice a high-fat diet, causing them to become obese. Signs of oxidative stress and certain properties of immune cells indicated aging of the immune system. These obese mice were then split into groups and received food supplemented either with 2-hydroxyoleic acid or omega-3 fatty acids for eight weeks. 'This is the first study, at least to our knowledge, to suggest the efficacy of 2-hydroxyoleic acid for reversing obesity-associated immune alterations and improving oxidative stress.' 2. Full paper title: Oxidative stress and immunosenescence in spleen of obese mice can be reversed by 2-hydroxyoleic acid DOI: 10.1113/EP086157 Link to paper http://onlinelibrary. (link will only work after the embargo date. Before then please email the press office for a copy of the paper) 3. Experimental Physiology publishes translation and integration of research, specifically manuscripts that deal with both physiological and pathophysiological questions that investigate gene/protein function using molecular, cellular and whole animal approaches. http://ep. 4. The Physiological Society brings together over 3,500 scientists from over 60 countries. The Society promotes physiology with the public and parliament alike. It supports physiologists by organising world-class conferences and offering grants for research and also publishes the latest developments in the field in its three leading scientific journals, The Journal of Physiology, Experimental Physiology and Physiological Reports. http://www. 5. Limitations: The study needs to be reproduced in humans to confirm the results


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

It has been proposed that somatic gene variations (SNV) present in few brain cells could facilitate the development of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease. Testing that hypothesis requires DNA sequencing directly in brain cells or tissue rather than in blood cells. However, the identification of SNV by standard and reliable sequencing procedures does not work well when the number of cells bearing the specific SNV (or mutation) is very low within the tissue. In this way, another techniques, such as high-throughput methods, could be used. However, those methods can introduce errors in reading sequence alignments that can interfere with the identification of true somatic variations. In this work, once a new SNV was identified using high-throughput methodologies, the bulk DNA lacking that particular SNV was eliminated by the use of a restriction nuclease that cleaves bulk DNA molecules but not the ones containing the specific SNV. In further steps, the uncleaved DNA was amplified and sequenced by a reliable (error-free) technique such as the Sanger's sequencing method (see Figure). By following this approach we have been able to achieve the validation of some somatic brain mutations. This work has been published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, volume 56(3), February 7, 2017 and it is the consequence of a close collaboration between several research groups working at the Centre for Molecular Biology "Severo Ochoa" (CSIC-UAM), University of Barcelona, CIBERNED, VHIR and Sygnis, a company developing molecular biology tools for genomics and proteomics. Grants from the BBVA Foundation, MICINN and also by the Queen Sophia Foundation have supported the study. ABOUT THE JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE (JAD) The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease is an international multidisciplinary journal to facilitate progress in understanding the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, genetics, behavior, treatment and psychology of Alzheimer's disease. The journal publishes research reports, reviews, short communications, book reviews, and letters-to-the-editor. Groundbreaking research that has appeared in the journal includes novel therapeutic targets, mechanisms of disease and clinical trial outcomes. The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease has an Impact Factor of 4.151 according to Thomson Reuters' 2014 Journal Citation Reports. The Journal is published by IOS Press.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

Conductive inks are useful for a range of applications, including printed and flexible electronics such as radio frequency identification (RFID) antennas, transistors, or photovoltaic cells. The advent of the internet of things is predicted to lead to new connectivity within everyday objects, including in food packaging. Thus, there is a clear need for cheap and efficient production of electronic devices, using stable, conductive, and non-toxic components. These inks can also be used to create novel composites, coatings, and energy storage devices. A new method for producing high quality conductive graphene inks with high concentrations has been developed by researchers in the Graphene Flagship, working at the Cambridge Graphene Centre at the University of Cambridge. The novel method uses ultrahigh shear forces in a microfluidisation process to exfoliate graphene flakes from graphite. The process converts 100 percent of the starting graphite material into usable flakes for conductive inks, avoiding the need for centrifugation and reducing the time taken to produce a usable ink. The research, published in ACS Nano, also describes optimization of the inks for different printing applications, as well as giving detailed insights into the fluid dynamics of graphite exfoliation. The inks produced by the microfluidisation process have high concentrations of up to 100 g of graphene flakes per liter. Using the most efficient rheology modifiers and stabilizers, the microfluidised graphene mixture is optimized for screen printing. Panagiotis Karagiannidis, a researcher at the University of Cambridge, is lead author of the work. "The motivation was the need for layers with low sheet resistance to be produced by screen printing using inks with high concentration," he says. As well as graphene, this method can easily be applied to other layered materials, such as hexagonal boron nitride or transition metal dichalcogenides. This will provide a family of printable circuit components — conductor, insulators, and semiconductors — with which to build a variety of printed electronics with different functionalities. These high-yield inks contain a high concentration of chemically unmodified few-layer graphene, leading to excellent conductivity of the final printed material. The inks also give an excellent sheet resistance below 2 Ω/sq, suitable for RFID antennas and electrodes in optoelectronic or energy storage devices. These inks are ideal for applications where low-cost is important. In the microfluidisation process, graphite powder is mixed with water and a surfactant is added to prevent flakes from aggregating. The mixture is passed through a microfluidiser, where it is forced at high pressure through a zig-zag shaped microchannel. Turbulent flow through the diamond-coated microchannel, leads to ultra-high shear rates of 108 s-1, exfoliating the graphite into few-layer flakes. Importantly, all of the input mixture flows through the microchannel and experiences the high shear, and the process can be repeated to achieve the required graphene flake sizes. "All of the starting mixture experiences the same uniform intensive shear levels, converting it into a usable ink with high concentration. There is no wastage of material or time consuming post-processing," adds Karagiannidis. Mar García-Hernandez of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) is the leader of the Graphene Flagship Work Package Enabling Materials, which is focused on development of scalable synthesis methods for graphene and other layered materials. "Microfluidisation is a huge leap ahead towards applications of affordable and environmentally friendly graphene inks in organic photovoltaics, RFID antennas, electrically conductive coatings or nanocomposites," she says. "The method is certainly well suited for the synthesis of a variety of other layered material inks, which will certainly enlarge the scope of applications of layered materials in real world devices." An important issue for the use of graphene inks in printed electronics and other applications is scalability — producing inks and dispersions in large enough quantities for industrial applications. With the 100 percent yield of the microfluidisation method, it is now possible to produce high quality graphene in sufficient quantities for commercial products. Inks produced using this method have already been commercialized via a University of Cambridge spin out company, Cambridge Graphene, which was recently acquired by engineering solutions company Versarien. The inks are also supplied to Graphene Flagship partner Novalia for use in their interactive touch-based printed electronic demos. Chris Jones of Novalia says, "For viable marketable applications, the materials need to be cost effective, easy to handle and show consistent performance. We ran these inks on ordinary industrial screen printing equipment without modification and achieved consistent results, printing hundreds of interactive demonstrators for Mobile World Congress. This is a very exciting point — a critical juncture between the laboratory and the public." Andrea Ferrari, Science and Technology Officer of the Graphene Flagship and Chair of its Management Panel, says, "This is an important conceptual advance, and will significantly help the innovation and industrialization goals of the Flagship. The fact that the process is already licensed and commercialized indicates how it is feasible to cut the time from lab to market even during the lifetime of the Flagship."


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: phys.org

A new method for producing high quality, water-based conductive graphene inks with high concentrations has been developed by researchers from the Graphene Flagship working at the Cambridge Graphene Centre at the University of Cambridge, UK. The novel method uses ultrahigh shear forces in a microfluidisation process to exfoliate graphene flakes from graphite. The process converts 100% of the starting graphite material into usable flakes for conductive inks, avoiding the need for centrifugation and reducing the time taken to produce a usable ink. The research is published in ACS Nano. The inks produced by the microfluidisation process have high concentrations of up to 100 g of graphene flakes per litre and can be optimised for screen printing. These inks can also be used to create novel composites, coatings and energy storage devices. This method can easily be applied to other layered materials, such as hexagonal boron nitride or transition metal dichalcogenides, to provide a family of printable circuit components – conductor, insulators and semiconductors – with which to build printed electronics with different functionalities. These inks are ideal for applications where low-cost is important. With the 100% yield of the microfluidisation method, it is now possible to produce high quality graphene inks in sufficient quantities for commercial products. Inks produced using this method have already been commercialised via a University of Cambridge spin out company, Cambridge Graphene, which was recently acquired by engineering solutions company Versarien. The inks are also supplied to Novalia, an innovative print company based in Cambridge, for use in their interactive touch-based printed electronic demos. Dr. Panagiotis Karagiannidis, a researcher at the Cambridge Graphene Centre, is lead author of the work. "The motivation was the need for layers with low sheet resistance to be produced by screen printing using inks with high concentration. In the microfluidisation process, all of the starting mixture experiences the same uniform intensive shear levels, converting it into a usable ink with high concentration. There is no wastage of material or time consuming post-processing." Prof. Andrea Ferrari is Director of the Cambridge Graphene Centre, Science and Technology Officer of the Graphene Flagship, and Chair of the Flagship Management Panel. He stated "This is an important conceptual advance, and will significantly help the innovation and industrialization goals of the Graphene Flagship. The fact that the process is already licensed and commercialized indicates how it is feasible to cut the time from lab to market even during the lifetime of the Flagship." Chris Jones of Novalia said "For viable marketable applications, the materials need to be cost effective, easy to handle and show consistent performance. We ran these inks on ordinary industrial screen printing equipment without modification and achieved consistent results, printing hundreds of interactive demonstrators for Mobile World Congress. This is a very exciting point - a critical juncture between the laboratory and the public." Mar García-Hernandez of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) is the leader of the Graphene Flagship Work Package Enabling Materials, which is focused on development of scalable synthesis methods for graphene and other layered materials. "Microfluidisation is a huge leap ahead towards applications of affordable and environmentally friendly graphene inks in organic photovoltaics, RFID antennas, electrically conductive coatings or nanocomposites. The method is certainly well suited for the synthesis of a variety of other layered material inks, which will enlarge the scope of applications of layered materials in real world devices." More information: Panagiotis G. Karagiannidis et al. Microfluidization of Graphite and Formulation of Graphene-Based Conductive Inks, ACS Nano (2017). DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.6b07735


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

NewsThe biosensor combines micromechanical silicon structures with gold nanoparticles, both functionalized with p24-specific antibodies. The technology is also being applied in the early detection of certain types of cancer.Contributed Author: Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)Topics: Pharma


— “The report provides a basic overview including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure and development policies and plans are discussed as well as manufacturing processes and cost structures.” This report studies Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with capacity, production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering CSIC CSSC Weichai YUCHAI Wartsila SDEC Cummins RongAn Power Zhongji Hitachi Zosen For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like North America Europe China Japan Southeast Asia India Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Diesel Engine Gas Turbine Engine Steam Turbine Engine Others Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines in each application, can be divided into Transport Vessels Working Vessel Military Vessel Others Global Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Market Research Report 2017 1 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Market Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines 1.2 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Segment by Type 1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines by Type in 2015 1.2.2 Diesel Engine 1.2.3 Gas Turbine Engine 1.2.4 Steam Turbine Engine 1.2.5 Others 1.3 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Segment by Application 1.3.1 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015 1.3.2 Transport Vessels 1.3.3 Working Vessel 1.3.4 Military Vessel 1.3.5 Others 1.4 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Market by Region 1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines (2012-2022) 2 Global Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Market Competition by Manufacturers 2.1 Global Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Production and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) 2.2 Global Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Revenue and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) 2.3 Global Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Average Price by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016) 2.4 Manufacturers Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area and Product Type 2.5 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Market Competitive Situation and Trends 2.5.1 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Market Concentration Rate 2.5.2 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Market Share of Top 3 and Top 5 Manufacturers 2.5.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion 7 Global Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 7.1 CSIC 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.1.2 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Product Type, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Product A 7.1.2.2 Product B 7.1.3 CSIC Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 CSSC 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.2.2 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Product Type, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Product A 7.2.2.2 Product B 7.2.3 CSSC Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 Weichai 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.3.2 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Product Type, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Product A 7.3.2.2 Product B 7.3.3 Weichai Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.4 YUCHAI 7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.4.2 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Product Type, Application and Specification 7.4.2.1 Product A 7.4.2.2 Product B 7.4.3 YUCHAI Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.5 Wartsila 7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.5.2 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Product Type, Application and Specification 7.5.2.1 Product A 7.5.2.2 Product B 7.5.3 Wartsila Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.6 SDEC 7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.6.2 Commercial and Recreational Marine Engines Product Type, Application and Specification 7.6.2.1 Product A 7.6.2.2 Product B For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com ABOUT US: Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. 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