Louise Coote Lupus Unit

London, United Kingdom

Louise Coote Lupus Unit

London, United Kingdom
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Sciascia S.,University of Turin | Radin M.,University of Turin | Yazdany J.,University of California at San Francisco | Levy R.A.,State University of Rio de Janeiro | And 3 more authors.
Autoimmunity Reviews | Year: 2017

Both BLISS-52 and BLISS-76 international phase III trials in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) met their primary outcomes; however, they were not designed to assess the efficacy of belimumab for the treatment of lupus nephritis (LN). LN is a frequent cause of SLE-associated morbidity and mortality, and emerging evidence suggests a potential therapeutic role for agents that target B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS).We conducted a systematic review to identify data on the effect of belimumab on LN.A total of 2004 patients with SLE were identified from 11 studies. Three hundred and twenty-six patients had LN at baseline and 234 (71.8%) of those received belimumab. Thirteen patients out of 234 (5.5%) received belimumab for active LN. Due to the heterogeneous definitions of treatment response, clinical presentation and renal involvement, it was not possible to compare results using a single outcome parameter. However, the majority of these studies defined clinical response in terms of rates of renal flare, renal remission, and/or renal organ disease improvement. One hundred twenty-nine (55.1%) of the 234 patients with LN at baseline showed an improvement in renal parameters after treatment with belimumab. In patients with baseline proteinuria. >. 0.2. g/24. h, (n = 687), those receiving belimumab had a median reduction in proteinuria during follow-up as high as 38%. When focusing on patients with proteinuria. ≥. 1. g/24. h (n = 228), 70.7% of those treated with belimumab (n = 157) achieved a renal response.In the pooled population of patients receiving belimumab, we found an overall annual renal flare rate of 1.7% [24/1448, mean observation time 1,1. years (0,5-3)].Despite the limitations of the studies included in this analysis, available data are promising and provide preliminary support for targeting BlyS to induce or maintain a renal response. Further trials should examine whether belimumab (alone or following rituximab) represents an additional therapeutic option in the treatment of LN. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Bertolaccini M.L.,King's College London | Sanna G.,Louise Coote Lupus Unit
F1000Research | Year: 2016

Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), also known as Hughes Syndrome, is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity in the presence of persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies. A patient with APS must meet at least one of two clinical criteria (vascular thrombosis or complications of pregnancy) and at least one of two laboratory criteria including the persistent presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), and/or anti-b2 glycoprotein I (anti-b2GPI) antibodies of IgG or IgM isotype at medium to high titres in patient's plasma. However, several other autoantibodies targeting other coagulation cascade proteins (i.e. prothrombin) or their complex with phospholipids (i.e. phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex), or to some domains of β2GPI, have been proposed to be also relevant to APS. In fact, the value of testing for new aPL specificities in the identification of APS in thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity patients is currently being investigated. © 2016 Bertolaccini ML and Sanna G.


PubMed | Louise Coote Lupus Unit and King's College London
Type: | Journal: F1000Research | Year: 2017

Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), also known as Hughes Syndrome, is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity in the presence of persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies. A patient with APS must meet at least one of two clinical criteria (vascular thrombosis or complications of pregnancy) and at least one of two laboratory criteria including the persistent presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), and/or anti-b2 glycoprotein I (anti-b2GPI) antibodies of IgG or IgM isotype at medium to high titres in patients plasma. However, several other autoantibodies targeting other coagulation cascade proteins (i.e. prothrombin) or their complex with phospholipids (i.e. phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex), or to some domains of 2GPI, have been proposed to be also relevant to APS. In fact, the value of testing for new aPL specificities in the identification of APS in thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity patients is currently being investigated.


Lie G.,Louise Coote Lupus Unit | Sciascia S.,Louise Coote Lupus Unit | Sciascia S.,University of Turin | Cuadrado M.J.,Louise Coote Lupus Unit
International Immunopharmacology | Year: 2015

Abstract With the introduction of biological agents, over the last two decades treatment prospects in many medical fields including Rheumatology have experienced an exciting revolution. The advent of biological therapy for specifically rheumatic diseases has provided more effective control of both the underlying disease, and sustained amelioration of disease activity, compared to the pre-biological era when only anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drugs were available. Although the importance of potential improved clinical outcome cannot be overstated, these efficacious treatments for rheumatic diseases are not without a high cost. Biological agents are expensive and rheumatological diseases are common. The patent and regulatory data protection periods for the first and second waves of biological agents based on recombinant proteins have begun to expire, leaving open the potential for development and regulatory approval of one or more "generic" versions of these biological therapies, termed "biosimilars" or "BSs" in Europe (the term we shall use from henceforth), "subsequent entry biologics" in Canada, or "follow-on-biologics" in US. We aimed to review the critical topics of efficacy, safety and regulatory approach of upcoming biosimilars. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Zhang H.,Louise Coote Lupus Unit | Chambers W.,Louise Coote Lupus Unit | Sciascia S.,University of Turin | Cuadrado M.J.,Louise Coote Lupus Unit
Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology | Year: 2016

Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterised by multisystem involvement and a relapsing remitting course. SLE is a highly heterogeneous condition, with wide variations in both the presentation and severity of disease and the biological markers identified.The use of biologics in SLE has lagged behind that of other rheumatological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, in part due to the diverse clinical manifestations of SLE, making it difficult to design appropriate trials for novel treatments. As such, broad immunosuppressive treatment regimens are still widely used in SLE. Nevertheless, in recent years, elucidation of some aspects of SLE pathogenesis have allowed the development of therapies targeted at molecular mediators of SLE. This review provides an update of biological available therapies and those currently under development. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.


PubMed | University of Turin, Louise Coote Lupus Unit and Thrombosis & Haemostasis Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of obstetrics and gynecology | Year: 2016

Antiphospholipid syndrome is defined by the combination of thrombotic events and/or obstetric morbidity in patients who have tested positive persistently for antiphospholipid antibodies. With good treatment, approximately 70% of pregnant women with antiphospholipid syndrome will deliver a viable live infant. However, current management does not prevent all maternal, fetal, and neonatal complications of antiphospholipid syndrome.This observational, retrospective, single-center cohort study aimed to assess pregnancy outcome in women with antiphospholipid antibodies who were treated with hydroxychloroquine in addition to conventional treatment during pregnancy.One-hundred seventy pregnancies in 96 women with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies were analyzed: (1) 51 pregnancies that occurred in 31 women were treated with hydroxychloroquine for at least 6 months before pregnancy, and the therapy continued throughout gestation (group A); (2) 119 pregnancies that occurred in 65 women with antiphospholipid antibodies that were not treated with hydroxychloroquine were included as controls (group B).Hydroxychloroquine-treatment was associated with a higher rate of live births (67% group A vs 57% group B; P = .05) and a lower prevalence of antiphospholipid antibodies-related pregnancy morbidity (47% group A vs 63% B; P = .004). The association of hydroxychloroquine with a lower rate of any complication in pregnancy was confirmed after multivariate analysis (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-136; P = .04). Fetal losses at >10 weeks of gestation (2% vs 11%; P = .05) and placenta-mediated complications (2% vs 11%; P = .05) were less frequent in group A than group B. Pregnancy duration was longer in group A than group B (27.6 [6-40] vs 21.5 [6-40] weeks; P = .03). There was a higher rate of spontaneous vaginal labor in hydroxychloroquine-treated women compared with group B (37.3% vs 14.3%; P = .01).Despite the heterogeneity in the 2 groups in terms of systemic lupus erythematosus prevalence and previous pregnancy history, our results support the concept that women with antiphospholipid antibodies may benefit from treatment with hydroxychloroquine during pregnancy to improve pregnancy outcome. The addition of hydroxychloroquine to conventional treatment is worthy of further assessment in a proper designed randomized controlled trial.


PubMed | University of Turin, Louise Coote Lupus Unit and University of Cordoba, Spain
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Rheumatology (Oxford, England) | Year: 2016

The current treatment of thrombotic APS patients includes long-term anticoagulation with oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), with warfarin being the one most commonly used. However, the use of VKAs can be challenging, especially in patients with APS. VKAs monitoring in patients with aPL is complicated by the heterogeneous responsiveness to LAs of reagents used in the International Normalized Ratio test, potentially resulting in instability of anticoagulation. For decades, VKAs were the only available oral anticoagulants. However, non-VKA oral anticoagulants, including a direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran etexilate) and direct anti-Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban), are currently available. The use of these agents may represent a major step forward since, unlike VKAs, they have few reported drug interactions and they do not interact with food or alcohol intake, thereby resulting in more stable anticoagulant intensity. Most importantly, monitoring their anticoagulant intensity is not routinely required due to their predictable anticoagulant effects. In this review, we discuss the clinical and laboratory aspects of non-VKA oral anticoagulants, focusing on the available evidence regarding their use in patients with APS.


Sciascia S.,Thrombosis & Haemostasis Center | Hunt B.J.,Thrombosis & Haemostasis Center | Talavera-Garcia E.,Louise Coote Lupus Unit | Lliso G.,Louise Coote Lupus Unit | And 2 more authors.
American journal of obstetrics and gynecology | Year: 2016

BACKGROUND: Antiphospholipid syndrome is defined by the combination of thrombotic events and/or obstetric morbidity in patients who have tested positive persistently for antiphospholipid antibodies. With good treatment, approximately 70% of pregnant women with antiphospholipid syndrome will deliver a viable live infant. However, current management does not prevent all maternal, fetal, and neonatal complications of antiphospholipid syndrome.OBJECTIVES: This observational, retrospective, single-center cohort study aimed to assess pregnancy outcome in women with antiphospholipid antibodies who were treated with hydroxychloroquine in addition to conventional treatment during pregnancy.STUDY DESIGN: One-hundred seventy pregnancies in 96 women with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies were analyzed: (1) 51 pregnancies that occurred in 31 women were treated with hydroxychloroquine for at least 6 months before pregnancy, and the therapy continued throughout gestation (group A); (2) 119 pregnancies that occurred in 65 women with antiphospholipid antibodies that were not treated with hydroxychloroquine were included as controls (group B).RESULTS: Hydroxychloroquine-treatment was associated with a higher rate of live births (67% group A vs 57% group B; P = .05) and a lower prevalence of antiphospholipid antibodies-related pregnancy morbidity (47% group A vs 63% B; P = .004). The association of hydroxychloroquine with a lower rate of any complication in pregnancy was confirmed after multivariate analysis (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-136; P = .04). Fetal losses at >10 weeks of gestation (2% vs 11%; P = .05) and placenta-mediated complications (2% vs 11%; P = .05) were less frequent in group A than group B. Pregnancy duration was longer in group A than group B (27.6 [6-40] vs 21.5 [6-40] weeks; P = .03). There was a higher rate of spontaneous vaginal labor in hydroxychloroquine-treated women compared with group B (37.3% vs 14.3%; P = .01).CONCLUSIONS: Despite the heterogeneity in the 2 groups in terms of systemic lupus erythematosus prevalence and previous pregnancy history, our results support the concept that women with antiphospholipid antibodies may benefit from treatment with hydroxychloroquine during pregnancy to improve pregnancy outcome. The addition of hydroxychloroquine to conventional treatment is worthy of further assessment in a proper designed randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Wong J.K.F.,Louise Coote Lupus Unit | Nortley R.,Guys And St Thomas Nhs Foundation Trust | Andrews T.,Guys And St Thomas Nhs Foundation Trust | D'Cruz D.,Louise Coote Lupus Unit
BMJ Case Reports | Year: 2014

A 54-year-old woman diagnosed with primary Sjögren's syndrome in 2007 presented with a 1-year history of visual hallucinations requiring admission to a psychiatric unit. The hallucinations resolved while on olanzapine and hydroxychloroquine but recurred when they were stopped. Despite restarting olanzapine, her visual hallucinations persisted. When she started a tapering dose of prednisolone, all the hallucinations resolved. This report adds to the small literature on psychiatric manifestations of Sjögren's syndrome and provides evidence that low-dose corticosteroids may be an effective treatment for this manifestation. Copyright 2014 BMJ Publishing Group.


PubMed | Louise Coote Lupus Unit and S Giovanni Bosco Hospital
Type: | Journal: BioDrugs : clinical immunotherapeutics, biopharmaceuticals and gene therapy | Year: 2016

Biological therapies represent a fundamental innovation for the management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, many biological originators have reached, or are about to reach, patent expiry and long-term therapy costs have become progressively unsustainable. CT-P13, a biosimilar of the anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) monoclonal antibody infliximab, might represent a significant alternative to its originator, with the potential to decrease medical care costs and, therefore, become available to a large number of patients.In this systematic review, we analyzed the data from available clinical trials that recently investigated the validity of indication extrapolation of CT-P13 for the treatment of IBD in nave patients and in patients who switched from its originator infliximab, focusing on clinical efficacy, safety and immunogenicity.A detailed literature search was developed a priori to identify articles that investigated the validity of indication extrapolation of CT-P13 for the treatment of IBD in TNF inhibitor treatment-nave patients and in patients who switched from the originator infliximab. This was applied to Ovid MEDLINE, In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus for content from 2012 to September 2016.We based our review on the available data from 11 studies that included a total of 1007 IBD patients: 570 patients suffering from Crohns disease (294 switched and 276 nave), 435 patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (127 switched and 308 nave), and two IBD unclassified patients (switched). Overall, no significant difference in efficacy and safety between the originator infliximab and its biosimilar CT-P13 was observed. When assessing the safety of CT-P13, we found that 9.2% of patients experienced adverse effects (4.1% infusion-related reactions and 4.3% infections).The analyzed studies did not report a significant difference in terms of efficacy, safety and immunogenicity when comparing the clinical experience with CT-P13 with the available literature data on the originator treatment in IBD. However, some debate is ongoing regarding interchangeability and immunogenicity.

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