Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital

Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France

Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital

Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Sayin H.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | Scridon A.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Targu Mures | Orea V.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | Chapuis B.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | And 4 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology | Year: 2015

This study examined whether chronic administration of pyridostigmine, a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor, would exacerbate episodes of spontaneous atrial tachyarrhythmia (AT) in conscious, aging, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Telemetric recordings of electrocardiogram (ECG, n = 5) and ECG/arterial pressure (n = 3) were performed in male 49-week old SHRs. After a 1-week period of continuous recording under baseline conditions, rats were implanted with osmotic minipumps that delivered pyridostigmine (15 mg/kg/day subcutaneously) for either 1 (n = 8) or 3 (n = 5) weeks. In the latter case, sympathovagal balance was assessed during the last infusion week by measuring heart rate (HR) changes in response to administration of cardiac autonomic blockers. An additional 1-week recording was performed after explantation of minipumps. Significant (P = 0.02) reductions in HR with no consistent changes in arterial pressure were observed. Frequency and duration of AT episodes were increased by pyridostigmine (0.01 ≤ P ≤ 0.07). This increase was sustained across the 3-week treatment period and reversible after cessation of treatment. Autonomic blockade revealed that intrinsic HR was above (P = 0.04) resting HR, pointing to a shift of sympathovagal balance towards vagal predominance. However, the respiratory-related component of HR variability (high-frequency power of RR interval) was lowered (P = 0.01) by pyridostigmine treatment, indicating reduced vagal modulation of HR. The results are consistent with a pathogenic role of the parasympathetic nervous system in the aging SHR model, and raise the possibility that sustained vagal activation may facilitate atrial arrhythmias. Copyright © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.


Girerd N.,Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital | Scridon A.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Targu Mures | Bessiere F.,Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital | Chauveau S.,Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Background:Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is associated to atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and outcome after AF ablation. We intended to determine whether global or local EAT is associated with systemic and/or left atrial (LA) inflammation and markers of endothelial dysfunction in AF patients.Methods and Results:Total, atrial, and ventricular EAT volume (EATtotal, EATatrial, EATventricular) were measured by multislice cardiac CT in 49 patients with paroxysmal (PAF, n=25) or persistent AF (PeF, n=24). Periatrial epicardial fat thickness at the esophagus (LA-ESO) and thoracic aorta (LA-ThA) were also measured. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin-8 (IL-8), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and von Willebrand Factor (vWF) levels were measured in peripheral and LA blood samples obtained during catheterization during AF ablation. Patients with PeF had higher EATatrial (P<0.05) and LA-ESO (P=0.04) than patients with PAF. VEGF, IL-8, and TGF-β1 were not associated with EAT. In contrast, after adjusting for LA volume and body mass index, higher LA-ThA was significantly associated with higher sICAM-1 and vWF levels, both in peripheral blood (P<0.05) and in LA (P<0.05). Similar results were found with LA-ESO. Body mass index, EATtotal and EATventricular were not associated with sICAM-1 and vWF.Conclusions:Periatrial epicardial fat showed a significant positive association with increased levels of sICAM-1 and vWF, which are biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction. No such associations were found when considering body mass index or EATtotal. These results suggest that local EAT rather than regional or total adiposity may modulate endothelial dysfunction in patients with AF. © 2013 Girerd et al.


Bresson D.,Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital | Girerd N.,Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital | Bouali A.,Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital | Turc J.,Desgenettes Military Hospital | Bonnefoy E.,Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital
American Journal of Emergency Medicine | Year: 2013

Pulseless electrical activity (PEA) after acute myocardial infarction is classically caused by ventricular free wall rupture. We report the case of a 76-year-old woman who presented a cardiac arrest with PEA 5 days after an embolic acute myocardial infarction. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed a massive mitral regurgitation due to posterior papillary muscle rupture. This case demonstrates that other causes potentially treatable than cardiac tamponade must be sought in patients with PEA after myocardial infarction. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Chevalier P.,Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital | Chevalier P.,Louis Pradel Cardiovascular Hospital | Cadi F.,Hospices Civils de Lyon | Scridon A.,Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital | And 7 more authors.
Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology | Year: 2013

Background - Therapeutic management of asymptomatic patients with a Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) pattern is controversial. We compared the risk:benefit ratios between prophylactic radiofrequency ablation and no treatment in asymptomatic patients with WPW. Methods and Results - Decision analysis software was used to construct a risk-benefit decision tree. The target population consisted of 20- to 40-year-old asymptomatic patients with WPW without structural fatal heart disease or a family history of sudden cardiac death. Baseline estimates of sudden death and radiofrequency ablation complication rates were obtained from the literature, an empirical data survey, and expert opinion. The outcome measure was death within 10 years. Sensitivity analyses determined the variables that significantly impacted the decision to ablate or not. Threshold analyses evaluated the effects of key variables and the optimum policy. At baseline, the decision to ablate resulted in a reduction of mortality risk of 8.8 patients for 1000 patients compared with abstention. It is necessary to treat 112 asymptomatic patients with WPW to save one life over 10 years. Sensitivity analysis showed that 3 variables significantly impacted the decision to ablate: (1) complication of radiofrequency ablation, (2) success of radiofrequency ablation, and (3) sudden death in asymptomatic patients with WPW. Conclusions - This study provides a decision aid for treating asymptomatic patients with the WPW ECG pattern. Using the model and the population we tested, prophylactic catheter ablation is not yet ready for widespread clinical use. © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc.


PubMed | Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Circulation. Arrhythmia and electrophysiology | Year: 2013

Therapeutic management of asymptomatic patients with a Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) pattern is controversial. We compared the risk:benefit ratios between prophylactic radiofrequency ablation and no treatment in asymptomatic patients with WPW.Decision analysis software was used to construct a risk-benefit decision tree. The target population consisted of 20- to 40-year-old asymptomatic patients with WPW without structural fatal heart disease or a family history of sudden cardiac death. Baseline estimates of sudden death and radiofrequency ablation complication rates were obtained from the literature, an empirical data survey, and expert opinion. The outcome measure was death within 10 years. Sensitivity analyses determined the variables that significantly impacted the decision to ablate or not. Threshold analyses evaluated the effects of key variables and the optimum policy. At baseline, the decision to ablate resulted in a reduction of mortality risk of 8.8 patients for 1000 patients compared with abstention. It is necessary to treat 112 asymptomatic patients with WPW to save one life over 10 years. Sensitivity analysis showed that 3 variables significantly impacted the decision to ablate: (1) complication of radiofrequency ablation, (2) success of radiofrequency ablation, and (3) sudden death in asymptomatic patients with WPW.This study provides a decision aid for treating asymptomatic patients with the WPW ECG pattern. Using the model and the population we tested, prophylactic catheter ablation is not yet ready for widespread clinical use.

Loading Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital collaborators
Loading Louis Pradel Cardiology Hospital collaborators