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Kisia D.,Louis Berger Group Inc.
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2012

Airport employees often account for a substantial share of daily airport access trips, yet current planning for airport landside access in the United States focuses almost exclusively on identifying and addressing the needs of air passengers. Airport worker travel patterns are normally studied by using the standard journey-to-work components of travel demand models and generally do not capture the unique factors affecting this group's commuting behavior. The Port Authority Trans-Hudson (PATH) commissioned a preliminary study evaluating the economic feasibility of extending PATH rail service to Newark Liberty International Airport, New Jersey. An empirical analysis of survey data collected during this effort suggests that the traditional travel demand model approaches to studying airport worker commuting patterns often mischaracterize the travel patterns and attitudes of a large airport access market segment. This research finds that the omission of airport worker input in the planning process is likely to result in the overestimation of public transit demand and may only exacerbate the optimism bias that has typically affected rail transportation investments in the United States.


Fiedel S.J.,Louis Berger Group Inc.
Quaternary International | Year: 2011

The 1300-year-long Younger Dryas cold reversal (12,900-11,600 cal BP) is seen most clearly in Greenland ice cores. Contemporaneous changes of climate and environment in more southerly regions were variably expressed. The precise timing of the abrupt Younger Dryas onset is still uncertain. It was linked to a sudden increase in 14C manifest as a "cliff" where 14C dates drop from 11,000 to 10,600 radiocarbon years BP within a century of real time, followed by a long plateau. Changes in ocean and/or atmospheric circulation or solar radiation, and even a comet impact have been proposed as triggers, but the abruptness and severity of YD onset still elude explanation. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.


Chatman D.G.,University of California at Berkeley | Tulach N.K.,Rutgers University | Kim K.,Louis Berger Group Inc.
Urban Studies | Year: 2012

Economic benefits are sometimes used to justify transport investments. Such was the case with the River Line of southern New Jersey, USA, which broke ground in 2000 and began operating in 2004. Recently, the line has been performing near full capacity and there is evidence that it has spurred development. Disaggregate data on owned-home appreciation are used to investigate the initial economic impacts of the line, looking carefully at non-linearity in the appreciation gradient, differential effects of station ridership and parking, redistribution of property appreciation gains and differences by property and neighbourhood type. At this time, the net impact of the line on the owned housing market is neutral to slightly negative. While lower-income census tracts and smaller houses seem to appreciate near the station, this may be a value transfer from farther-away properties not favoured with access. Few studies have previously looked for such effects. © 2011 Urban Studies Journal Limited.


Fiedel S.J.,Louis Berger Group Inc. | Kuzmin Y.V.,RAS Institute of Geology and Mineralogy
Radiocarbon | Year: 2010

Recent efforts to precisely date the florescence of the Clovis culture in North America have been hampered by both practical and theoretical problems: 1) The era of Clovis expansion (about 11,20-10,700 BP or 13,20-12,700 cal BP) coincides with the gap between the anchored central European tree-ring sequence (back to 12,400 cal BP) and the floating Bølling-Allerød sequence; 2) Clovis seems to immediately precede the onset of the Younger Dryas (YD) stadial. The "black mats" of the US Southwest appear to mark the regional occurrence of this climatic downturn. However, the timing and means of long-distance propagation of this climatic event are not yet well understood. Greenland ice cores (GISP2, GRIP, and NGRIP) remain poorly synchronized, with a discrepancy of 100 to 250 yr for the date of onset (as late as 12,700 cal BP, or as early as 12,950 cal BP); 3) The YD onset was accompanied by a rapid drop of radiocarbon ages from 11,000 to 10,600 BP in less than a century. The mechanism causing this was probably a change in overturning circulation in the North Atlantic. Do variable Clovis ages, often from what appear to be single-occupation contexts, reflect this "cliff" effect, slightly earlier minor reversals during the late Allerød, or simply the practical limitations of precision of the 14C method? 4) Dates for Fishtail or Fell I sites (with fluted, stemmed points) in southern South America are statistically indistinguishable from Clovis dates in North America. Does this imply very rapid population expansion, diffusion of tool-making techniques through long-established local populations (as argued by Waters and Stafford 2007), or abnormally large interhemispheric 14C offsets? 5) Are recent ostensibly high-precision collagen-derived dates for Paleoindian-associated fauna (e.g. horse and mammoth) reliable? Are interlaboratory blind tests of the new filtration processes necessary? © 2010 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.


Pinter N.,Southern Illinois University Carbondale | Fiedel S.,Louis Berger Group Inc. | Keeley J.E.,U.S. Geological Survey | Keeley J.E.,University of California at Los Angeles
Quaternary Science Reviews | Year: 2011

Across North and South America, the final millennia of the Pleistocene saw dramatic changes in climate, vegetation, fauna, fire regime, and other local and regional paleo-environmental characteristics. Rapid climate shifts following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) exerted a first-order influence, but abrupt post-glacial shifts in vegetation composition, vegetation structure, and fire regime also coincided with human arrival and transformative faunal extinctions in the Americas. We propose a model of post-glacial vegetation change in response to climatic drivers, punctuated by local fire regime shifts in response to megaherbivore-driven fuel changes and anthropogenic ignitions. The abrupt appearance of humans, disappearance of megaherbivores, and resulting changes in New World fire systems were transformative events that should not be dismissed in favor of climate-only interpretations of post-glacial paleo-environmental shifts in the Americas. Fire is a mechanism by which small human populations can have broad impacts, and growing evidence suggests that early anthropogenic influences on regional, even global, paleo-environments should be tested alongside other potential causal mechanisms. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


The consortium, comprised of Cintra, Meridiam, Ferrovial Agroman US and Allan Myers VA, submitted a proposal to design, build, finance, maintain and operate the "Transform 66 Outside the Beltway" project under the Public Private Partnership Transportation Act, which enables Virginia to deliver major transportation improvements such as express lanes, toll collection systems and auxiliary lanes. The project extends for 22 miles along the Interstate 66 corridor outside of the beltway between US Route 29 and Interstate 495. "We are thrilled to be a part of the I-66 Express Mobility Partners team to deliver this signature public-private-partnership project in one of the nation's most congested corridors," said Mike Kirk, Louis Berger senior vice president. "This project will play an important role in increasing mobility and economic growth for Northern Virginia and the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area." Under the public-private-partnership agreement, Express Mobility Partners will fund $500 million in upfront improvements in the corridor as well as $800 million for transit service and $350 million in other project improvements over the next 50 years in exchange for rights to collect and set dynamic tolls on the I-66 Express Lanes for the same 50 year concession period. Louis Berger is a $1 billion global professional services corporation that helps infrastructure and development clients solve their most complex challenges. We are a trusted partner to national, state and local government agencies; multilateral institutions; and commercial industry clients worldwide. By focusing on client needs to deliver quality, safe, financially-successful projects with integrity, we are committed to deliver on our promise to provide Solutions for a better world. Louis Berger operates on every habitable continent. We have a long-standing presence in more than 50 nations, represented by the multidisciplinary expertise of 6,000 engineers, economists, scientists, managers and planners.


Louis Berger plans to initially focus on strengthening established relationships with private industry partners based in the U.K. The company is also assessing broader opportunities to partner and bid specific to the rail, highway, power, and water markets, where Louis Berger is best able to leverage its global expertise as a strong local partner in the United Kingdom. On November 4, James Rousell joined Louis Berger as the new vice president and managing director for the Country. He is responsible for growing the business, as well as preparing, implementing, and delivering operating plans for the local partner. Most of Louis Berger's international corporate management will be based in the U.K. The company also will be scaling up project staff and working to establish a U.K.-based operation that will offer the full suite of services provided by Louis Berger. Because Louis Berger operates in a project-based industry, most of the employees will remain positioned at project sites around the globe. The ceremony took place at Louis Berger's new offices at Avalon House, 72 Lower Mortlake Road in Richmond. Louis Berger's international operations headquarters formerly were in Paris. The company's global headquarters will remain in Morristown, New Jersey, USA. Louis Berger is a $1 billion global professional services corporation that helps infrastructure and development clients solve their most complex challenges. We are a trusted partner to national, state and local government agencies; multilateral institutions; and commercial industry clients worldwide. By focusing on client needs to deliver quality, safe, financially-successful projects with integrity, we are committed to deliver on our promise to provide Solutions for a better world. Louis Berger operates on every habitable continent. We have a long-standing presence in more than 50 nations, represented by the multidisciplinary expertise of 6,000 engineers, economists, scientists, managers and planners. Pictured above: (Left to right) President of Louis Berger's international operations Tom Topolski; Mayor of Richmond upon Thames, Councilor David Linnette; and Louis Berger President and CEO Jim Stamatis cut the ribbon at the official opening of Louis Berger's new international headquarters in Richmond, London, U.K. Sharing in the celebration are (rear, left to right) Louis Berger executives James Bach, chief operating officer; Greg Matthews, executive vice president and chief engineer; Jesper Damgaard, senior vice president and managing director for Europe; Meg Lassarat, chief financial officer; and Peter Skinner, chief operating officer for Louis Berger's international operations.


MORRISTOWN, NJ--(Marketwired - March 01, 2017) - Nichole Pitts, vice president, international compliance and ethics officer at Louis Berger, has been recognized as one of the 2016 Attorneys Who Matter by the Ethisphere Institute. Pitts is included in the compliance category on Ethisphere's annual list that recognizes ethical and responsible business practices globally. "It's an honor to be among the list of Ethisphere's 2016 Attorneys Who Matter," Pitts said. "Louis Berger makes it a priority to use ethical and responsible practices around the globe, and we continue to improve our practices globally. We hope recognition -- like this award -- will inspire other professionals to work diligently to improve business practices and improve society as a whole." Attorneys Who Matter represent all areas of practice, including federal agencies, in-house counsel, ethics and compliance officers of major companies, and outside counsel. Those on the Attorneys Who Matter list raise the bar for ethical behavior in their industries and boast a commendable track record of public service, legal community engagement and academic involvement. Pitts has more than 20 years of experience in compliance and ethics, and is a Society of Corporate Compliance and Ethics Certified Compliance & Ethics Professional (CCEP) and an International Association of Privacy Professionals certified professional (CIPP). She is involved in the International Association of Privacy Professionals, American Bar Association and Society of Corporate Compliance & Ethics. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in History and in Afro American Studies from Indiana University Bloomington, and a Doctor of Jurisprudence from Indiana University Maurer School of Law. "It is an honor to have one of our own acknowledged as a global leader in compliance and ethics," said Jim Stamatis, president and CEO at Louis Berger. "Ethisphere sets the standard for compliance and ethics, and Louis Berger, through the efforts of industry thought leaders such as Nichole, is committed to infusing a culture of integrity across our global operations." The full list is published in Ethisphere Magazine and available online at: http://ethisphere.com/magazine/attorneys-who-matter/. Louis Berger is a $1 billion global professional services corporation that helps infrastructure and development clients solve their most complex challenges. We are a trusted partner to national, state and local government agencies; multilateral institutions; and commercial industry clients worldwide. By focusing on client needs to deliver quality, safe, financially-successful projects with integrity, we are committed to deliver on our promise to provide Solutions for a better world. Louis Berger operates on every habitable continent. We have a long-standing presence in more than 50 nations, represented by the multidisciplinary expertise of 6,000 engineers, economists, scientists, managers and planners.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

DUBLIN, IRELAND and LONDON, ENGLAND / ACCESSWIRE / November 30, 2016 / Louis Berger's Anthony O'Neill has been presented with Engineers Ireland's 2016 International Engineer of the Year award for his work on the Serbian E75 highway. O'Neill serves as team leader and chief resident engineer on this challenging project. Louis Berger has been providing project management and supervision services for the modernization and upgrade of the E75 highway since 2011. The highway modernization project is of paramount importance for regional development. The opened sections are part of the Pan-European Corridor X, which runs between Salzburg, Austria and Thessaloniki, Greece, providing connections throughout Central and Eastern Europe. Last year, Louis Berger received praise from Serbian Prime Minister Aleksandar Vučić for its construction management expertise and the quality of service delivered. "Our team has overcome a number of technical obstacles ranging from challenging geographical conditions such as those of the Morava River gorge to legal issues related to land expropriations," said Slav Marjanovic, vice president and managing director for Eastern Europe. "The Morava gorge is a very rugged, mountainous area, and the river, railway line, an existing road and the new motorway are squeezed into a single narrow corridor." Engineers Ireland annually recognizes the achievements of members and partner organizations who have demonstrated exceptional engineering skills and made a significant contribution to the engineering body of knowledge in Ireland. This year's Excellence Awards were presented in association with the Electricity Supply Board. The award ceremony took place in early November in Dublin, Ireland. Louis Berger is a $1 billion global professional services corporation that helps infrastructure and development clients solve their most complex challenges. We are a trusted partner to national, state and local government agencies; multilateral institutions; and commercial industry clients worldwide. By focusing on client needs to deliver quality, safe, financially-successful projects with integrity, we are committed to deliver on our promise to provide Solutions for a better world. Louis Berger operates on every habitable continent. We have a long-standing presence in more than 50 nations, represented by the multidisciplinary expertise of 6,000 engineers, economists, scientists, managers and planners. Pictured above: Anthony O'Neill with his International Engineer of the Year Award, which was presented to him by ESB chief executive Pat O'Doherty and director general of Engineers Ireland Caroline Spillane. DUBLIN, IRELAND and LONDON, ENGLAND / ACCESSWIRE / November 30, 2016 / Louis Berger's Anthony O'Neill has been presented with Engineers Ireland's 2016 International Engineer of the Year award for his work on the Serbian E75 highway. O'Neill serves as team leader and chief resident engineer on this challenging project. Louis Berger has been providing project management and supervision services for the modernization and upgrade of the E75 highway since 2011. The highway modernization project is of paramount importance for regional development. The opened sections are part of the Pan-European Corridor X, which runs between Salzburg, Austria and Thessaloniki, Greece, providing connections throughout Central and Eastern Europe. Last year, Louis Berger received praise from Serbian Prime Minister Aleksandar Vučić for its construction management expertise and the quality of service delivered. "Our team has overcome a number of technical obstacles ranging from challenging geographical conditions such as those of the Morava River gorge to legal issues related to land expropriations," said Slav Marjanovic, vice president and managing director for Eastern Europe. "The Morava gorge is a very rugged, mountainous area, and the river, railway line, an existing road and the new motorway are squeezed into a single narrow corridor." Engineers Ireland annually recognizes the achievements of members and partner organizations who have demonstrated exceptional engineering skills and made a significant contribution to the engineering body of knowledge in Ireland. This year's Excellence Awards were presented in association with the Electricity Supply Board. The award ceremony took place in early November in Dublin, Ireland. Louis Berger is a $1 billion global professional services corporation that helps infrastructure and development clients solve their most complex challenges. We are a trusted partner to national, state and local government agencies; multilateral institutions; and commercial industry clients worldwide. By focusing on client needs to deliver quality, safe, financially-successful projects with integrity, we are committed to deliver on our promise to provide Solutions for a better world. Louis Berger operates on every habitable continent. We have a long-standing presence in more than 50 nations, represented by the multidisciplinary expertise of 6,000 engineers, economists, scientists, managers and planners. Pictured above: Anthony O'Neill with his International Engineer of the Year Award, which was presented to him by ESB chief executive Pat O'Doherty and director general of Engineers Ireland Caroline Spillane.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and Rutgers University's Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy presented highlights and key insights from their experiences as summer fellows, interning at Louis Berger offices or project sites. Separate events were held in New Brunswick and Newark, New Jersey in mid-November. "The 2016-2017 fellows represent an outstanding group of planners and engineers, and are among the strongest group Louis Berger has welcomed so far - a fact due in no small part to the strong relationships we have cultivated with NJIT and Rutgers University's Bloustein School," said Bob Nardi, Louis Berger senior vice president. The six fellows represent multiple disciplines, including urban planning, architecture, law, and a range of engineering fields. This year's Louis Berger Fellows from NJIT are Amir Goharpey and Prashanth Muralidhar. The Louis Berger Fellows from the Bloustein School are Andrew Balmer, Luke Hansen, Leonardo Cavalcanti, and Chloe Strasser. Balmer and Muralidhar worked on metro projects in Doha, Qatar. Calvalcanti supported an urban renewal project in Colon, Panama. Strasser worked on transportation projects throughout Africa. Hansen and Goharpey worked together in Washington, D.C. on a municipal asset management project. Since 1996, Louis Berger has provided financial support to 45 Bloustein School students. Of those students, 28 fellows have received practical experience on company projects underway around the world. In 2014, NJIT and Louis Berger established a six-year special graduate internship and fellowship program for students pursuing a Master's degree in civil engineering, environmental engineering, architecture, engineering management, mechanical engineering, and industrial engineering. Louis Berger is a $1 billion global professional services corporation that helps infrastructure and development clients solve their most complex challenges. We are a trusted partner to national, state, and local government agencies; multilateral institutions; and commercial industry clients worldwide. By focusing on client needs to deliver quality, safe, financially-successful projects with integrity, we are committed to deliver on our promise to provide Solutions for a better world. Louis Berger operates on every habitable continent. We have a long-standing presence in more than 50 nations, represented by the multidisciplinary expertise of 6,000 engineers, economists, scientists, managers, and planners. From left to right: Bob Nardi, senior vice president at Louis Berger; Louis Berger Fellows Amir Goharpey and Prashanth Muralidhar; NJIT Professor Sotirios Ziavras and Gregory Mass, executive director of career services, in Newark on November 17, 2016. From left to right: Bloustein Professor Robert Boland; Louis Berger Fellows Luke Hansen, Leonardo Cavalcanti, Chloe Strasser and Andrew Balmer; and Bob Nardi, senior vice president at Louis Berger, in New Brunswick on November 14, 2016.

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