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Mengistu D.A.,Bahir Dar University | Waktola D.K.,Los Angeles Mission College
Journal of Land Use Science | Year: 2016

To monitor land-use/land-cover (LULC) change and assess its impact on the soil property, the availability of benchmark data is indispensable, which is hardly available in the intensively cultivated regions of developing countries. Our study attempts to solve this problem by generating a benchmark soil data through the development of modified spatial analogue (MSA) method in the context of the Upper Dijo River catchment, south-central Ethiopia. The magnitude and patterns of LULC changes were extracted from air photos and satellite imageries, along with the acquisition of soil samples from the reference and target sites through ground survey. Analysis of digital image processing shows significant LULC changes in a period that spanned three decades. The impact of LULC change on soil quality was assessed by comparing the soil physico-chemical properties sampled from the reference and target sites. The result shows a decline in total nitrogen, organic matter, available potassium and pH levels in soils collected from target sites, which conforms to results reported by studies conducted in data-rich environment. With careful validation, MSA could be useful for monitoring soil property changes in data-scarce environment and generate soil-related parameters for agro-ecological models. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.


An analysis of California’s college career training programs by leading higher education resource site, Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org), has revealed the top 54 schools in the state for trade and vocational education. Crediting two-year and four-year schools respectively, the site ranked Lincoln University, Humphreys College Stockton and Modesto Campuses, University of LaVerne, American River College, Sacramento City College, College of the Sequoias, Cosumnes River College and Cerritos College among the top scoring for Best Schools for Trade & Vocational Programs in California for 2016-2017. “Some of today’s fastest growing industries are in trade and vocational fields, and projections show these industries continuing to gain steam over the next decade,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “The California colleges credited on our list are those helping students achieve maximum success with not only high quality training, but career placement and counseling services that can pave the way to successful job placement.” The Community for Accredited Online Schools requires colleges and universities to meet minimum standards to qualify for ranking. Institutions must be regionally accredited and hold public or private not-for-profit status to be considered. For the Best Trade & Vocational Programs list, schools must also offer career counseling and placement services to assist students. Qualifying schools are scored and ranked based on analysis of more than a dozen unique statistics, such as student-teacher ratios and program variety. A full list of schools on California’s ranking, as well as details on the data points and methodology used to determine scores and list position can be found at: Allan Hancock College American River College Antelope Valley College Bakersfield College Cabrillo College California College San Diego, San Diego California College San Diego, San Marcos Cerritos College Cerro Coso Community College Chabot College Chaffey College Citrus College City College of San Francisco Coastline Community College College of Alameda College of San Mateo College of the Canyons College of the Desert College of the Redwoods College of the Sequoias Contra Costa College Cosumnes River College Crafton Hills College Cuyamaca College De Anza College Diablo Valley College East Los Angeles College El Camino College Folsom Lake College Foothill College Fresno City College Fullerton College Glendale Community College Golden West College Grossmont College Humphreys College - Stockton & Modesto Campuses Imperial Valley College Irvine Valley College Lake Tahoe Community College Laney College Las Positas College Lassen Community College Lincoln University Long Beach City College Los Angeles City College Los Angeles Harbor College Los Angeles Mission College Los Angeles Pierce College Los Angeles Southwest College Los Angeles Trade Technical College Los Angeles Valley College Los Medanos College Merced College Mission College Monterey Peninsula College Moorpark College Moreno Valley College Mt. San Antonio College Napa Valley College Norco College Ohlone College Orange Coast College Oxnard College Pasadena City College Porterville College Reedley College Rio Hondo College Riverside City College Sacramento City College Saddleback College San Bernardino Valley College San Diego City College San Diego Mesa College San Diego Miramar College San Jose City College Santa Barbara City College Santa Monica College Santa Rosa Junior College Shasta College Sierra College Skyline College Solano Community College Taft College University of La Verne Ventura College Victor Valley College West Los Angeles College Yuba College About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


Zhang T.-Y.,University of California at Los Angeles | Ji S.,Los Angeles Mission College | Bozovic D.,University of California at Los Angeles
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. © 2015 Zhang et al.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Valles-Ayoub Y.,HIBM Research Group | Esfandiarifard S.,HIBM Research Group | No D.,HIBM Research Group | No D.,Los Angeles Mission College | And 6 more authors.
Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers | Year: 2011

Wolman disease (WD) is a rare inherited condition caused by lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency first described in Iranian-Jewish (IJ) children. Newborns with WD are healthy and active, but soon the infant develops symptoms of severe malnutrition in the first few months of life, and often dies before the age of 1 year. Harmful amounts of lipids accumulate in the spleen, liver, bone marrow, intestine, adrenal glands, and lymph nodes. Although worldwide incidence is estimated at 1/350,000 newborns, WD occurs at higher than expected frequency in the IJ community of the Los Angeles area. As a validation study, we analyzed 162 DNA specimens of IJ origin by automated sequencing. For LIPA p.G87V (ggc>gtc, alternative numbering p.G66V), a heterozygous frequency of 5/162 (3.086%) was discovered. Thus, we estimate that as high as 1 in 4200 newborns of IJ couples may be at risk. Additional studies are required to confirm and further validate the higher frequencies seen in our sample pool, and to determine if people of IJ and even possibly Middle Eastern descent are at a higher risk for WD. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Balas K.,California State University, Northridge | Balas K.,Los Angeles Mission College | Dumitrescu A.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Toth C.D.,California State University, Northridge | Toth C.D.,Tufts University
Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics, LIPIcs | Year: 2016

For points p1, . . . , pn in the unit square [0, 1]2, an anchored rectangle packing consists of interior-disjoint axis-aligned empty rectangles r1, . . . , rn ⊆ [0, 1]2 such that point pi is a corner of the rectangle ri for i = 1, . . . , n (ri is anchored at pi). We show that for every set of n points in [0, 1]2, there is an anchored rectangle packing of area at least 7/12-O(1/n), and for every n ∈ ℕ, there are point sets for which the area of every anchored rectangle packing is at most 2/3. The maximum area of an anchored square packing is always at least 5/32 and sometimes at most 7/27. The above constructive lower bounds immediately yield constant-factor approximations, of 7/12 - ε for rectangles and 5/32 for squares, for computing anchored packings of maximum area in O(n log n) time. We prove that a simple greedy strategy achieves a 9/47-approximation for anchored square packings, and 1/3 for lower-left anchored square packings. Reductions to maximum weight independent set (MWIS) yield a QPTAS and a PTAS for anchored rectangle and square packings in nO(1/ε) and exp(poly(log(n/ε))) time, respectively. © Kevin Balas, Adrian Dumitrescu, and Csaba D. Tóth.


Khademian H.,HIBM Research Group | Mehravar E.,Sangesar Charity Organization for HIBM | Urtizberea J.A.,Hopital Marin | Sagoo S.,HIBM Research Group | And 7 more authors.
Clinical Genetics | Year: 2013

GNE myopathy or hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is an ultra-rare severely disabling autosomal recessive adult onset muscle disease which affects roughly one to three individuals per million worldwide. Genetically, HIBM is caused by mutations in the glucosamine (UDP-N-acetyl)-2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase gene (GNE), resulting in diminished enzyme function and reduced sialic acid biosynthesis. A founder variant GNE p.M712T was first described in patients of Iranian and Middle-Eastern descent living outside of Iran. Asymptomatic heterozygote or carrier frequency has been reported as high as 1 in 11 within the Persian-Jewish community residing in Los Angeles, CA. To investigate the prevalence of the p.M712T variant in Iran, we studied 792 samples collected from random individuals in Sangesar (Mahdishahr) in Northern Iran. DNA samples were obtained by buccal swab, and genotyping was performed by melting curve analysis. The results included 31 of 792 (3.91%) heterozygous carriers and 5 (0.31%) homozygotes for GNE p.M712T. All five homozygous individuals, age 30-64years, were already symptomatic at the start of the study. Our findings suggest that the prevalence of GNE p.M712T is higher in the Sangesar population, comprised mostly of Muslim and Bahai descendants, compared with the general world population. Additional HIBM distribution studies are warranted within various subpopulations of Iran. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Valles-Ayoub Y.,HIBM Research Group | Esfandiarifard S.,HIBM Research Group | Sinai P.,HIBM Research Group | Carbajo R.,HIBM Research Group | And 9 more authors.
Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers | Year: 2012

Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is a young-adult onset autosomal recessive disorder caused by a hypomorphic rate limiting enzyme of sialic acid biosynthesis. The enzyme is UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N- acetylmannosamine kinase, and is encoded by the GNE gene. HIBM causes slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Patients are typically diagnosed at 20-30 years of age, and most patients are incapacitated and wheelchair-confined by 30-50 years of age. Some sialic acid containing glycoproteins, including neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), are hyposialylated in HIBM muscle biopsy samples. We developed a method to allow detection of serum NCAM sialylation using Western blot, and tested serum samples from several patients and a HIBM mouse model. Preliminary results showed a clear difference in polysialylated and hyposialylated forms of NCAM extracted from serum, and showed NCAM is hyposialylated in HIBM serum samples. This initial finding may prove useful in reducing the need for serial muscle biopsies in HIBM treatment trials. Additional studies are underway to further validate this finding and to evaluate the specificity, reliability, and robustness of this potential serum biomarker for HIBM. © 2012 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Waktola D.K.,Los Angeles Mission College
Applied Geography | Year: 2015

This study attempt to visualize the spatial patterns of selected academic attributes across college classroom space based on data from a map-embedded smart attendances and GIS visualizations. The academic attributes of 542 participants from Los Angeles Mission College (LAMC) in California were analyzed in a GIS platform. The spatial dynamics of student success revealed the distance decay effect on test scores, class participation, and class attendance. The visualization of class performance highlighted the spatial interdependence between seat location and academic attributes, which was validated by 145 sample students' perceived mental maps generated from the accompanying questionnaire survey. The replication of the visualization technique across different class sizes and courses could help educators identify seats for early intervention and micromanagement of classrooms. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Balas K.,California State University, Northridge | Balas K.,Los Angeles Mission College | Toth C.D.,California State University, Northridge | Toth C.D.,Tufts University
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2015

We consider packing axis-aligned rectangles r1, . . . , rn in the unit square [0, 1]2 such that a vertex of each rectangle ri is a given point pi (i.e., ri is anchored at pi); and explore the combinatorial structure of all locally maximal configurations. When the given points are lower-left corners of the rectangles, then the number of maximal packings is shown to be at most 2nCn, where Cn is the nth Catalan number. The number of maximal packings remains exponential in n when the points may be arbitrary corners of the rectangles. Our upper bounds are complemented with exponential lower bounds. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.


PubMed | Los Angeles Mission College and University of California at Los Angeles
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor.

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