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Greensboro, NC, United States

Long G.A.,Lorillard Tobacco Company
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health | Year: 2014

Exhaled aerosols were collected following the use of two leading U.S. commercial electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and a conventional cigarette by human subjects and analyzed for phenolics, carbonyls, water, glycerin and nicotine using a vacuum-assisted filter pad capture system. Exhaled breath blanks were determined for each subject prior to each product use and aerosol collection session. Distribution and mass balance of exhaled e-cigarette aerosol composition was greater than 99.9% water and glycerin, and a small amount (<0.06%) of nicotine. Total phenolic content in exhaled e-cigarette aerosol was not distinguishable from exhaled breath blanks, while total phenolics in exhaled cigarette smoke were significantly greater than in exhaled e-cigarette aerosol and exhaled breaths, averaging 66 μg/session (range 36 to 117 μg/session). The total carbonyls in exhaled e-cigarette aerosols were also not distinguishable from exhaled breaths or room air blanks. Total carbonyls in exhaled cigarette smoke was significantly greater than in exhaled e-cigarette aerosols, exhaled breath and room air blanks, averaging 242 μg/session (range 136 to 352 μg/session). These results indicate that exhaled e-cigarette aerosol does not increase bystander exposure for phenolics and carbonyls above the levels observed in exhaled breaths of air. © 2014 by the author; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Source


Heck J.D.,Lorillard Tobacco Company
Food and Chemical Toxicology | Year: 2010

Cigarette smoking is established as a substantial contributor to risks for cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Less is known about the potential of cigarette composition to affect smoking risks. The use of cigarette flavoring ingredients such as menthol is currently of worldwide public health and regulatory interest. The unique conditions of menthol inhalation exposure that occur coincident with that of the complex cigarette smoke aerosol require specialized studies to support an assessment of its safety in cigarette flavoring applications. The present state of knowledge is sufficient to support an assessment of the safety of the use of menthol in cigarettes. Scientific, smoking behavioral and epidemiological data available through mid-2009 is critically reviewed and a broad convergence of findings supports a judgment that menthol employed as a cigarette tobacco flavoring ingredient does not meaningfully affect the inherent toxicity of cigarette smoke or the human risks that attend smoking. There remains a need for well-designed studies of the potential of menthol to affect smoking initiation, cessation and addiction in order to differentiate any independent effects of menthol in cigarettes from those imposed by socioeconomic, environmental and peer influences on these complex human behaviors. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


A composition for imparting reduced ignition propensity properties to a smoking article by treating the smoking article wrapper. The composition comprising at least one phase transition substance which, upon being subjected to the heat of the smoking article burning firecone, physically transforms and at least partially fills the pores of the smoking article wrapper to reduce the permeability of the wrapper in the vicinity of the burning firecone. The reduced permeability of the wrapper in the vicinity of the firecone will permit sufficient air flow to sustain free burn, but, when the smoking article is placed on a substrate, the reduced permeability of the wrapper imparts reduced ignition propensity such that there is insufficient air flow to sustain combustion of the firecone or insufficient air flow to sustain an intensity of the burning firecone necessary to ignite the substrate.


A method for imparting reduced ignition propensity properties to a smoking article by treating the smoking article wrapper with a phase transition substance which, upon being subjected to the heat of the smoking article burning firecone, physically transforms and at least partially fills the pores of the smoking article wrapper to reduce the permeability of the wrapper in the vicinity of the burning firecone. The reduced permeability of the wrapper in the vicinity of the firecone will permit sufficient air flow to sustain free burn, but, when the smoking article is placed on a substrate, the reduced permeability of the wrapper imparts reduced ignition propensity such that there is insufficient air flow to sustain combustion of the firecone or insufficient air flow to sustain an intensity of the burning firecone necessary to ignite the substrate.


Method of applying phase transition substance to impart reduced ignition propensity to a smoking article comprising a tobacco column and a wrapper surrounding the tobacco column and having a porous structure with a base permeability. The method comprising forming a pattern of phase transition material on the wrapper such that, when subjected to the heat of the tobacco column burning firecone, the phase transition material at least partially fills the wrapper porous structure in the vicinity of the burning firecone to form an area on the wrapper having reduced permeability lower than that of the wrapper base permeability. The reduced permeability of the wrapper in the vicinity of the burning firecone imparts reduced ignition propensity such that there is insufficient air flow to sustain combustion of the firecone or insufficient air flow to sustain an intensity of the burning firecone necessary to ignite the substrate.

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