Brooklyn, NY, United States
Brooklyn, NY, United States

Long Island University is a private, coeducational, nonsectarian institution of higher education with locations and programs spanning the New York metropolitan area, overseas, and online. The university offers more than 500 academic programs at two main campuses, LIU Post and LIU Brooklyn, as well as non-residential programs at LIU Brentwood, LIU Riverhead, and LIU Hudson at Rockland and Westchester. LIU has NCAA Division I and II athletics and hosts the annual George Polk Awards in Journalism. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Karim Belhadjali, who has more than 20 years’ experience in ecosystem restoration, storm and flood risk reduction, has joined Abt Associates as a Principal Associate of Environment and Natural Resources. Before joining Abt, Belhadjali worked for 15 years in Louisiana where he held multiple positions at the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA). At CPRA, he served as program manager for Louisiana’s 2017 Coastal Master Plan and led a multidisciplinary team of more than 70 scientists, geologists, economists and engineers on the state-of-the-art approach to climate change adaptation. Belhadjali also managed the award-winning 2012 Coastal Master Plan, based on a two-year analysis involving some of the state’s best scientists, as well as national and international specialists. Belhadjali, as a Peace Corps volunteer in Tuvalu, worked on fisheries resource assessment, inshore fisheries development, coastal resource conservation, ciguatera monitoring and provided advice for the sustainable management of fisheries resources. He worked with island communities and other non-government organizations on guidelines for the development of community fisheries projects with particular emphasis on the sustainable use of coastal marine resources. Belhadjali holds a Master of Science in Fisheries from Louisiana State University and a Bachelor of Science in Marine Biology from Long Island University. About Abt Associates Abt Associates is a mission-driven, global leader in research, evaluation and program implementation in the fields of health, social and environmental policy, and international development. Known for its rigorous approach to solving complex challenges, Abt Associates is regularly ranked as one of the top 20 global research firms and one of the top 40 international development innovators. The company has multiple offices in the U.S. and program offices in more than 60 countries. http://www.abtassociates.com


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

WANT to get to the bottom of one of the biggest mysteries in science? The best way might be to catch sight of a fast-spinning stellar corpse. General relativity, which describes massive objects like black holes, and quantum mechanics, which governs subatomic particles, are tremendously successful in their own realms. But no one has yet come up with a way to unite them. A theory of quantum gravity is one of the most sought after in physics (see “The string-loop theory that might finally untangle the universe“). Several candidates exist, but current Earth-based experiments can’t test them directly. Now, Michael Kavic at Long Island University in New York and his colleagues have devised a cosmic test. Their apparatus: a binary system made up of a black hole and a pulsar. Only tens of kilometres across, a pulsar forms when a star at least eight times the mass of the sun runs out of nuclear fuel and explodes as a supernova. What remains is a rotating object that also emits beams of radio waves from its magnetic poles. Those poles seldom coincide with its rotational axis, meaning a suitably placed observer will see the radio signal “flashing” past with near-perfect regularity, like a lighthouse beam. This eerie repetition meant that when pulsars were discovered in the 1960s, they were thought to be alien beacons. That regularity also makes them good quantum gravity probes, says Kavic. “If they do observe something, that would be big. It would be a whole new field of study” Some theories, like one proposed by Steven Giddings at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 2014, predict that the black hole’s internal state can be linked to quantum fields outside, in the black hole’s “atmosphere”. This coupling would show up as fluctuations in the space-time around the black hole. If a pulsar is orbiting it, its radio signal will look normal whenever the pulsar passes in front of the black hole. But when the black hole eclipses the pulsar, the radio beam will reach us via a region of space-time that is steeply curved by the immense gravity. General relativity predicts that as a result, the signal will arrive early or late at our radio telescopes, with the discrepancy altering smoothly as the pulsar orbits. Quantum gravity, however, says the fluctuating space-time will alter the signal in irregular ways – such that a graph of the arrival times will look “fuzzy”. Studying a fuzzy pulsar could confirm Giddings’s version of quantum gravity. Kavic and his colleagues propose searching for pulsar-black hole pairs using planned instruments such as the Square Kilometre Array and the Event Horizon Telescope (arxiv.org/abs/1607.00018v3). Crucially, this type of measurement has been done before: astronomers have examined pulsars in binary systems with neutron stars, which are stellar corpses that don’t emit a lighthouse-like radio beam. “We know how to do this,” Kavic says. Those observations failed to detect any departures from general relativity. But black holes are more massive than neutron stars, so warp space-time more dramatically and could show a measurable effect. Some theorists are sceptical. Samir Mathur at Ohio State University in Columbus says the test might just not work. The quantum effects would need to extend far enough outside the event horizon – the surface inside of which matter can’t escape the black hole – to affect those pulsar beams that skirt the black hole. Even Giddings says there’s some luck involved in finding a binary that fits the bill. That said, Mathur feels the idea is a good one. “If they do observe something, that would be big,” he says. “It would be a whole new field of study.” This article appeared in print under the headline “Fuzzy pulsars could help unmask quantum gravity”


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University is pleased to announce the launch of an affiliated Institute at Long Island University (LIU) that will help nonprofits increase their fundraising capabilities and positive impact in the Northeast United States. The addition marks the ongoing expansion of a nationwide network of Institutes that are led by the founding Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University to offer curricula for nonprofit leaders and fundraisers based on the vision of philanthropist and entrepreneur T. Denny Sanford. The approaches are presented by recognized nonprofit leaders, members of academia, and renowned philanthropists. Through the arrangement, the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at Long Island University has access to educational resources and content developed through the founding Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University. The founding Institute, launched in 2014, is based out of the private, nonprofit National University, which is the anchor institution of the National University System. A foundational element of each Institute is the Cause Selling approach, which blends the passion of philanthropy with an emphasis on proven business and sales principles to support the work of frontline nonprofit fundraisers. Other affiliated Institutes have opened at John F. Kennedy University, which is part of the National University System and serves the San Francisco Bay Area; Augustana University; and Bellevue University. “The Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at Long Island University is a natural extension of the University’s longstanding tradition of service,” said Long Island University President Dr. Kimberly R. Cline. “We are proud to join this nationwide movement and carry out Mr. T. Denny Sanford’s vision by supporting the great work of our region’s nonprofit community.” Dr. Lena Rodriguez, Endowed Director of the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University, said: “We are very pleased to celebrate the launch of the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at Long Island University, which will strengthen the philanthropic culture in the region they serve and build the capacity of nonprofit leaders. The vision of Mr. Sanford is to make the world a better place, and through the work of the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy we create stronger communities through more sustainable and impactful nonprofits.” LIU’s own broad and ongoing partnerships with local, regional and national nonprofit organizations have brought services and opportunities to its students and extended community alike, and the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at Long Island University will strengthen these partnerships by serving as a resource for nonprofit organizations in the Northeast that wish to increase their fundraising capabilities and their impact in the community. The core approaches of the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy network are based on Mr. Sanford’s own interactions with hundreds of nonprofits and foundations, and his desire to offer fundraisers access to proven approaches that more effectively convey their causes. The Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University has overseen the development of a one-of-its kind textbook, Cause Selling: The Sanford Way, which is based on the vision of Mr. Sanford and outlines in detail how the cause selling approach can strengthen fundraising effectiveness through business and sales principles that incorporate communication skills, basic psychology, research, strategy and data analysis. The Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University has also developed more than 30 educational content modules that focus on Cause Selling and related topics of donor relations, planned giving, and social media/marketing for nonprofits. The modules are available online for affiliated Institutes to develop workshops and seminars in coordination with nonprofit leaders, members of academia and renowned philanthropists who bring their own professional and regional perspective to the content. More than 12,000 nonprofit leaders have benefitted from the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University programs, which include seminars and lectures and webinars. The Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University also meets standards of excellence as outlined by Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) International and has been approved by the nonprofit certification organization as a Continuing Education Provider. About the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University The Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University is leading a national initiative dedicated to strengthening the impact of nonprofits through fundraising-focused educational programs that are presented by recognized nonprofit leaders, members of academia and renowned philanthropists. Based on the vision of philanthropist and entrepreneur T. Denny Sanford, the founding Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University was launched in 2014 to develop curriculum that is now being shared with affiliated Institutes around the country. To learn more about the movement led by the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University: http://sanfordeducationprograms.org/instituteofphilanthropy.cfm


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

South Dakotan and entrepreneur T. Denny Sanford, one of the country’s most generous philanthropists, is donating $28 million to the private, nonprofit National University System to further its role leading the national adoption of three initiatives: Sanford Harmony, Sanford Inspire and the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy. Based on the vision of Mr. Sanford, the three Sanford Education Programs provide innovative, research-based solutions designed to address critical needs in teacher education, PreK-12 instruction and nonprofit fundraising. The donation, which is the largest ever received by the National University System, ensures the continued expansion of all three programs, which give people the tools to develop better relationships. More than 500,000 PreK-12 students from Los Angeles to New York City are being reached through a phased roll-out of two of the initiatives: Sanford Harmony, a PreK-6 social emotional learning program that promotes positive peer interactions and communication among boys and girls; and Sanford Inspire, which supports inspiring PreK-12 teaching through teacher education. The Sanford Harmony program, based on eight years of research at Arizona State University’s T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics, has also been adopted in some of the largest school districts in the country. “We are very appreciative to have received this historic gift, which affirms the remarkable impact of these initiatives and allows for us to expand even further the capacity of these programs to transform the lives of our children, schools and communities,” said Dr. Michael R. Cunningham, Chancellor of the National University System, a network of nonprofit education institutions including National University that collectively serve higher education and K-12 students. “We are honored to carry out the vision of Denny Sanford, who is the inspiration and driving force behind these programs, and we are dedicated to ensuring their impact will last for generations.” The donation from Mr. Sanford brings total funding to date for the programs to approximately $70 million, which comes through a combination of donations from Mr. Sanford, Dr. Cunningham, anonymous donors and matching funds from National University itself. The National University System is leading the nationwide expansion of the programs through collaborations with more than a dozen other universities and numerous school districts around the country. The funding allows for Sanford Harmony to be available to PreK-12 schools at no cost. “Helping others is what this is all about, and it’s why I’m so pleased to recognize the remarkable impacts these three programs are having nationwide,” said Mr. Sanford. “What started out as a dream is now a reality, and to me the greatest gift of all is being able to see for myself how these programs are strengthening our communities and helping children succeed in school and life.” With adoption in more than three dozen states, the PreK-6 Sanford Harmony social emotional learning program continues to expand significantly. Based on Mr. Sanford’s desire to improve relationships among children into adulthood, Sanford Harmony supports positive peer interactions through lessons and activities that encourage communication, collaboration, and mutual respect among boys and girls. The program is being adopted by public and private schools, Boys and Girls Clubs and Magnet Schools of America. It is also being introduced to three of the five largest school districts in the country: New York City, where in partnership with Long Island University the program is in the process of reaching more than 100,000 students; as well as in Los Angeles and Clark County, Nevada. “I am confident that the Sanford Harmony program will lead to stronger and healthier relationships among children while fostering positive, lifelong relationships and ultimately lowering divorce rates,” said Mr. Sanford. With new resources being developed monthly, the Sanford Inspire program now offers 60 video training modules developed in collaboration with Arizona State University. The PreK-12 initiative is based on Mr. Sanford’s vision to support inspiring teaching, and was developed in conjunction with Teach for America. Sanford Inspire provides access to research-based teaching methodologies, and on-demand, self-guided online modules and offers a tool box to help teachers create inspiring classroom environments. A movement as well as a resource, Sanford Inspire principles and resources are being integrated as part of teacher education programs by a growing number of colleges and universities and impacting to date about 14,000 pre-service and in-service teachers. National University’s Sanford College of Education, which is among the Top Ten largest schools of education in the country, has aligned Sanford Inspire principles with its curriculum and programs. More than a dozen other schools and colleges of education are currently adopting Sanford Inspire, including City University of Seattle, which is also part of the National University System, and Nova Southeastern University in Florida. National University performed the research and development of the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University, which has directly impacted more than 12,000 frontline nonprofit fundraisers. The University is also supporting the expansion of a national network of affiliated Institutes at universities around the country, including John F. Kennedy University, and City University of Seattle, both affiliates of the National University System; Bellevue University; Augustana University; and Long Island University in New York. The founding Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University has created foundational curriculum based on the vision of Mr. Sanford to increase the impact of nonprofits through a unique focus on frontline fundraising and donor relations. A common cornerstone among each Institute is the Cause Selling approach, which blends the passion of philanthropy with an emphasis on proven business principles. With the development of more than 30 instructional modules and a one-of-its-kind textbook – Cause Selling: The Sanford Way – the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at National University meets the standards of excellence as outlined by Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) International and has been approved by the nonprofit certification organization as a Continuing Education Provider. About the National University System     The National University System is a network of accredited nonprofit education institutions serving higher education and K-12 students that includes National University, John F. Kennedy University, City University of Seattle, WestMed College and the Division of Pre-College Programs. Established in 2001 to meet the emerging challenges and demands of education in the 21st Century, the network’s complementary universities offer pathways for students to attain professional and terminal degrees through quality and innovative programs delivered in a format that is flexible to the needs of adult learners. The anchor institution, National University, was founded in 1971 and is among the largest private, nonprofit institutions of higher education in California with more than 150,000 alumni. For more information on the National University System: https://www.nusystem.org/ About the Sanford Education Center and Sanford College of Education at National University The Sanford Education Center at National University was established in 2014 through the generous support of philanthropist T. Denny Sanford to provide innovative programs in the nonprofit and PreK-12 sectors. The Center, in coordination with universities around the country, is leading the national expansion of three initiatives: Sanford Harmony, Sanford Inspire and the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy. The Center’s initiatives are supported by National University, which is home to the Sanford College of Education, and the National University System. Learn more: http://sanfordeducationprograms.org/


"We are encouraged that the results from this web-based text-message survey are in line with data from more traditional polling organizations," said Dr. Edward Summers, Fellow at the Hornstein Center.  "The Steven S. Hornstein Center is at the forefront of opinion research innovation. This is just one part of LIU's vision to transform techniques across disciplines." Dr. Summers, who obtained his PhD in Public Policy, is a Fellow at the Hornstein Center. His career includes extensive experience in public policy, higher education, and opinion research. "The data shows that Americans want to see more productivity out of Washington, DC and would like to see Congress and the President working together to move the nation forward," said Dr. Summers. When broken down by age groups, the poll found a sharp contrast between respondents under 30 and respondents over 65. Only 38 percent of respondents aged 18-29 approved of President Trump's job performance, whereas 55 percent of respondents aged 65 and older approved. The findings are based on a published public opinion poll conducted from June 6 through June 12, 2017. This Long Island University Steven S. Hornstein Center for Policy, Polling & Analysis statistical poll was conducted June 6th to June 12th, 2017 entirely by SMS text messages connected to the web and conducted in English to 985 registered voters aged 18-80. Polling data was sorted by age, political affiliation, gender & geographic location in efforts to ensure a nationwide representative sample. This poll has an overall margin of error of +/- 3.1 points. The Steven S. Hornstein Center for Policy, Polling & Analysis is an independent and non-partisan institute directed by Dr. Stanley B. Klein which endeavors to conduct research on a variety of issues affecting the American electorate. Dr. Klein has taught political science for over 50 years at LIU-Post bringing extensive experience in politics, government, and academia to the work done here at the Steven S. Hornstein Center."  For more information, contact Andrew.Batcheller@liu.edu LIU is one of the nation's largest private universities. Since 1926, LIU has provided high quality academic programs taught by world-class faculty.  LIU offers 500 accredited programs to more than 20,000 students and has a network of over 200,000 alumni, including leaders in industries across the globe. Visit liu.edu for more information. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/long-island-universitys-hornstein-center-for-policy-polling-and-analysis-measures-presidential-and-congressional-job-approval-300476089.html


Patent
City University of New York, Pace University and Long Island University | Date: 2015-03-19

The present invention relates to novel antiviral compounds which are covalently attached to solid, macro surfaces. In another embodiment, the invention relates to novel antiviral compositions including a polymeric material and, embedded therein, an antiviral compound. In other embodiments, the invention relates to making a surface antiviral and making a polymeric material antiviral.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: LINGUISTICS | Award Amount: 73.77K | Year: 2015

Subject-verb agreement is pervasive in many languages and it is one of the earliest syntactic relations that children must master. Prior research has suggested that its course of acquisition is different in different languages: early production but late comprehension have been observed in English, Spanish and Xhosa (Bantu) while production and comprehension are both early in French (by 30 months of age). The PIs in this collaborative project, Dr. Legendre and Dr. Barriere, seek to reconcile these results by evaluating the hypothesis that children can detect agreement markers better and earlier in languages in which these markers are both perceptually salient and semantically transparent.

The research project will target four languages chosen because their relevant properties allow a number of factors to be teased apart: English, Spanish, French, and Haitian Creole. This project is innovative in seeking to investigate the role of perceptual factors, both at the sentential level and cross-linguistically, and fosters interdisciplinary approaches to the study of language acquisition by melding research in theoretical syntax, psycholinguistics, corpus analysis, and speech perception, and combining their respective research methods. The project will stimulate international collaborations between the PIs in the US and research consultants in France, and will provide valuable research experience for a post-doctoral researcher, and for graduate and undergraduate students at the two US sites.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 159.99K | Year: 2013

This proposal is based on a geometric study of cohomology theories. Cohomology theories provide useful invariants for topological spaces, and their classification by the spectra provides a unified picture, indicating how numerous they are. Nevertheless, our understanding of cohomology theories, along with their equivariant, differential, and other mixed variants, remains limited. This is partly due to the fact that aside from a few examples, such as ordinary cohomology and K-theory, there are no good geometric descriptions of the cohomology classes of a given theory with immediate ties to naturally occurring objects in geometry. Even in the case of K-theory and its variants, our current understanding leaves many questions unanswered. Geometrically representing classes of a theory has proven to be useful in many regards, including the construction of non-homotopy invariant refinements, like differential theories, their equivariant versions, and pushforwards (cocycle level index theorems). In this proposal, the PI studies several ways of obtaining geometric models for K-theories (equivariant, differential, and their mixes) as well as refinements that take into account the Wilson line effects by using the Bismut Chern character. In one component of the research, the PI studies differential K-theory using representatives of the Atiyah class in the Toledo-Tong twisted resolution. In another, the PI aims to use his work with his collaborators, on the equivariant holonomy for abelian gerbes, to study topological invariants of non-abelian grebes. The main tool for this part is the equivariant topological chiral homology. This research has graduate student components.

Cohomology theories, their variants, and refinements are part of a branch of mathematics called topology. Cohomological invariants can measure a wide variety of phenomena, from wrappings of a piece of rope around a pole, to the possibilities for the shape of the universe. Cohomological techniques and descriptions have taken a central role in modeling high energy physics phenomena to the extent that several fundamental concepts were originally discovered by physicist and mathematicians independently. Comparison and cross-fertilization between the two fields has resulted in an accelerated enrichment of both, a trend that continues to pick up momentum increasingly. A modern categorical point of view now serves as a common language for mathematicians and physicists to explore cohomological ideas and their byproducts. Several components of the grant engage undergraduate and graduate students.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: GRAVITATIONAL THEORY | Award Amount: 180.46K | Year: 2013

Observing highly energetic astrophysical sources through fundamentally different radiation channels will be crucial in order to better understand some of the most intriguing, even exotic, objects and events in our universe. Included among these are compact binary objects, composed of black holes and neutron stars, as well as gamma ray bursts and related phenomena. Such objects are powerful engines for the production of gravitational, electromagnetic and neutrino radiation. Many research groups as well as observatories and experiments (both planned and already in operation), are engaged in attempting to observe, interpret and understand these emissions. Their overall understanding will be enhanced and furthered as theoretical insight and predictions are used to aid in their detection and in testing fundamental theories and phenomena. Our purpose here is to systematically consider non-vacuum compact binary systems and to do so with sufficient fidelity to obtain their emissions in gravitational and electromagnetic waves. We will do so by incorporating realistic equations of state, electromagnetic interactions and cooling effects. In particular, our approach is to tie ever more tightly together our theoretical understanding of the possible components and sources of multi-messenger astrophysics. We will build our efforts on a strong computational foundation, namely a robust implementation of the equations of general relativistic, resistive magnetohydrodynamics with adaptive mesh refinement.

This research is of broad interest and naturally combines expertise and know-how that reaches beyond physicists to astrophysicists and mathematicians. It will advance our understanding of some of the most intriguing processes in the universe, and will provide valuable candidate waveforms for gravitational wave observatories (e.g. LIGO). Our participation in multinational efforts to compare waveforms and approaches will be especially valuable to the gravitational wave and astrophysical communities. The activities described here will help further undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral research and training, including a number of underrepresented individuals. Also, this work uses the HAD infrastructure and thus helps support broadly useful, publicly released, software. Additionally, this research involves some of the most exotic objects in our universe that captures the imagination of the general public.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: GRAVITATIONAL THEORY | Award Amount: 60.00K | Year: 2016

A new window on the universe opened recently with the detection of gravitational waves by the LIGO gravitational wave observatory. Other telescopes observe electromagnetic waves (that includes visible light), and this new window will give us quite different and complementary information. The work described here seeks to understand better how to get the most information from these gravitational wave observations. In particular, we study the very violent merger of neutron stars and black holes to determine how the properties of these systems are encoded in both gravitational and electromagnetic waves.

The goals supported by this award are to study the dynamics of compact objects and the radiation they emit to capture the most science possible from aLIGO and similar detectors. We will do so through computational studies of binary systems incorporating magnetized matter with resistive effects, realistic equations of state, electromagnetic and neutrino emission, and r-process nucleosynthesis. Our efforts will include the following: (i) We will determine gravitational waveforms from these binaries, with a focus on observable imprints from the neutron star equation of state, mass, and radius. (ii) We will investigate the construction of analytic and phenomenological gravitational wave templates. (iii) We will study outflows from merging binaries as an indicator of events with characteristic electromagnetic and neutrino signals. (iv) We will study the global behavior of magnetic fields and the electromagnetic emissions, such as jets, that originate in the magnetosphere of coalescing binaries.

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