Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary

Brisbane, Australia

Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary

Brisbane, Australia
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News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

After only one year on the market, SnooZzoo, the all-in-one, animal-themed, child-sized sleeping bag will now also be available in adult sizes. Designed in the shape of favorite zoo animals, this combination backpack, sleeping bag, and plush animal for children was first available in 2015 in six styles. “The demand in the children’s market has been incredible,” said entrepreneur and SnooZzoo owner Cameron Jones. “Even more unexpected has been the subsequent call for an adult-sized SnooZzoo. As soon as I launched the children’s product, I began getting emails and message board posts asking when adult sizes were coming. I thought, ‘why let the kids have all the fun?’. So after working hard on prototypes over the last year, I’m proud to offer SnooZzoo in an adult size.” Beginning October 24, SnooZzoo will offer a panda, polar bear, brown bear and black bear in a 78-inch adult size. Designed to accommodate a person up to 72 inches tall, the adult SnooZzoo will retail for $169.95 and be available at http://www.snoozzoo.com/. See photos here: http://snoozzoo.com/photos/ and a brief video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=071uhkqui5k&feature=youtu.be The same fun, unique aspect of the child-sized sleeping bag that allows a person to “become” the animal applies to the larger product. The feet and paws unzip and a person can actually climb in the sleeping bag, placing their arms and legs inside SnooZzoo’s limbs to stay cuddly warm. The feet and paws connect to form large loops, allowing people to wear SnooZzoo as a backpack and walk from place to place. Adults can share the fun kids are experiencing with these cuddly animals. SnooZzoo is not designed to be a costume, but a sleeping bag. Whereas the children’s sizes come with a themed “travel kit” for overnight slumber party essentials like a toothbrush and PJs, the adult sizes do not feature the travel pouch. About Cameron Jones Entrepreneur and inventor Cameron Jones grew up in Brisbane, Australia, near the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary. The sanctuary was founded by his grandfather as the first and largest koala sanctuary in the world. Lone Pine is home to more than 130 koalas as well as other iconic Australian wildlife including dingoes, kangaroos and Tasmanian devils. Jones moved to the U.S. as a boy of 11, but the memories of life Down Under and at Long Pine left an indelible mark and inspired a lifelong passion for wildlife conservation. After earning a business degree from Duquesne University, Jones spent 27 years as a successful businessman, owning several prominent auto dealerships in the Pittsburgh area and holding leadership positions in several vehicle trade associations. The idea for SnooZzoo sparked during conversations with his best friend’s young daughter, an animal lover like himself. Jones sold his dealerships and in 2014, embarked on a nearly two-year journey of marketing studies, building prototypes and developing a network of trusted vendors and suppliers for the entrepreneurial product, SnooZzoo. In his spare time, Jones enjoys deep sea fishing, golf and spending time with his wife Marie, a leading Pittsburgh attorney.


Charlton B.D.,University of Vienna | Charlton B.D.,University of Sussex | Reby D.,University of Sussex | Ellis W.A.H.,Central Queensland University | And 2 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Examining how increasing distance affects the information content of vocal signals is fundamental for determining the active space of a given species' vocal communication system. In the current study we played back male koala bellows in a Eucalyptus forest to determine the extent that individual classification of male koala bellows becomes less accurate over distance, and also to quantify how individually distinctive acoustic features of bellows and size-related information degrade over distance. Our results show that the formant frequencies of bellows derived from Linear Predictive Coding can be used to classify calls to male koalas over distances of 1-50 m. Further analysis revealed that the upper formant frequencies and formant frequency spacing were the most stable acoustic features of male bellows as they propagated through the Eucalyptus canopy. Taken together these findings suggest that koalas could recognise known individuals at distances of up to 50 m and indicate that they should attend to variation in the upper formant frequencies and formant frequency spacing when assessing the identity of callers. Furthermore, since the formant frequency spacing is also a cue to male body size in this species and its variation over distance remained very low compared to documented inter-individual variation, we suggest that male koalas would still be reliably classified as small, medium or large by receivers at distances of up to 150 m. © 2012 Charlton et al.


Khan S.A.,Queensland University of Technology | Waugh C.,Queensland University of Technology | Waugh C.,University of The Sunshine Coast | Rawlinson G.,Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary | And 9 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2014

Chlamydial infections are wide spread in koalas across their range and a solution to this debilitating disease has been sought for over a decade. Antibiotics are the currently accepted therapeutic measure, but are not an effective treatment due to the asymptomatic nature of some infections and a low efficacy rate. Thus, a vaccine would be an ideal way to address this infectious disease threat in the wild. Previous vaccine trials have used a three-dose regimen; however this is very difficult to apply in the field as it would require multiple capture events, which are stressful and invasive processes for the koala. In addition, it requires skilled koala handlers and a significant monetary investment. To overcome these challenges, in this study we utilized a polyphosphazine based poly I:C and a host defense peptide adjuvant combined with recombinant chlamydial major outer membrane protein (rMOMP) antigen to induce long lasting (54 weeks) cellular and humoral immunity in female koalas with a novel single immunizing dose. Immunized koalas produced a strong IgG response in plasma, as well as at mucosal sites. Moreover, they showed high levels of C. pecorum specific neutralizing antibodies in the plasma as well as vaginal and conjunctival secretions. Lastly, Chlamydia-specific lymphocyte proliferation responses were produced against both whole chlamydial elementary bodies and rMOMP protein, over the 12-month period. The results of this study suggest that a single dose rMOMP vaccine incorporating a poly I:C, host defense peptide and polyphosphazine adjuvant is able to stimulate both arms of the immune system in koalas, thereby providing an alternative to antibiotic treatment and/or a three-dose vaccine regime. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Hernandez-Sanchez J.,Papworth Hospital | Brumm J.,Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary | Timms P.,Queensland University of Technology | Timms P.,University of The Sunshine Coast | Beagley K.W.,Queensland University of Technology
Vaccine | Year: 2015

Objectives: To assess the impact of Chlamydia vaccination on survival of captive koalas, and to compare the incidence of lymphomas and neoplasias between vaccinated and unvaccinated koalas. Methods: Survival analysis using Cox and Weibull regressions on 54 vaccinated and 52 matched unvaccinated koalas, and chi-square contingency table for incidence of lymphomas/neoplasias. Results: Vaccination was found to have a significant positive effect on koala lifespan ( P= 0.03), with vaccinated koalas having a median lifespan of 12.25 years compared to 8.8 years for unvaccinated ones. The effect of sex on lifespan was not significant ( P= 0.31). The risk ratio of unvaccinated over vaccinated koalas was 2.2 with both Cox and Weibull regressions. There was no association between the incidence of lymphoma/neoplasias and vaccination status ( P= 0.33). Conclusions: Koalas vaccinated with a prototype Chlamydia vaccine may live longer than unvaccinated ones. There was no known Chlamydia infection among koalas, so our interpretation is that vaccination may have boosted the innate and adaptive immune systems to protect against a wide spectrum of bacteria, fungi and parasites. Vaccinated koalas did not show negative physiological effects of the vaccine, for example, the frequency of deaths due to lymphomas/neoplasias was the same in both vaccinated and unvaccinated animals. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Carey A.J.,Queensland University of Technology | Timms P.,Queensland University of Technology | Rawlinson G.,Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary | Brumm J.,Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary | And 3 more authors.
American Journal of Reproductive Immunology | Year: 2010

Problem: Chlamydial infections represent a major threat to the survival of the koala. Infections caused by Chlamydia pecorum cause blindness, infertility, pneumonia and urinary tract infections and represent a threat to the survival of the species. Little is known about the immune response in koalas, or the safety of commonly used adjuvants for induction of protective systemic and mucosal immunity. Method of study: In the present study, we immunized 18 healthy female koalas subcutaneously with a combination of three chlamydial antigens [major outer membrane protein (MOMP), NrdB and TC0512 (Omp85)] mixed with one of three different adjuvants [Alhydrogel, Immunostimulating Complex (ISC) and TiterMax Gold]. Results: All adjuvants induced strong neutralizing IgG responses in plasma against the three antigens with prolonged responses lasting more than 270 days seen in Alhydrogel and ISC immunized animals. Cloacal IgG responses lasting >270 days were also induced in ISC-immunized animals. Chlamydia-specific peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferative responses were elicited by both Alhydrogel and ISC, and these lasted >270 days in the ISC group. Conclusion: The data show that a multi-subunit chlamydial vaccine, given subcutaneously, can elicit Chlamydia-specific cell-mediated and antibody responses in the koala demonstrating that the development of a protective vaccine is feasible. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Kollipara A.,Queensland University of Technology | Wan C.,Queensland University of Technology | Rawlinson G.,Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary | Brumm J.,Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary | And 4 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2013

Chlamydia continues to be a major pathogen of koalas. The bacterium is associated with ocular, respiratory and urogenital tract infections and a vaccine is considered the best option to limit the decline of mainland koala populations. Over the last 20 years, efforts to develop a chlamydial vaccine in humans have focussed on the use of the chlamydial major outer membrane protein (MOMP). Potential problems with the use of MOMP-based vaccines relate to the wide range of genetic diversity in its four variable domains. In the present study, we evaluated the immune response of koalas vaccinated with a MOMP-based C. pecorum vaccine formulated with genetically and serologically diverse MOMPs. Animals immunised with individual MOMPs developed strong antibody and lymphocyte proliferation responses to both homologous as well as heterologous MOMP proteins. Importantly, we also showed that vaccine induced antibodies which effectively neutralised various heterologous strains of koala C. pecorum in an in vitro assay. Finally, we also demonstrated that the immune responses in monovalent as well as polyvalent MOMP vaccine groups were able to recognise whole chlamydial elementary bodies, illustrating the feasibility of developing an effective MOMP based C. pecorum vaccine that could protect against a range of strains. © 2013.


PubMed | Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary, University of Saskatchewan, University of The Sunshine Coast and Queensland University of Technology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Vaccine | Year: 2014

Chlamydial infections are wide spread in koalas across their range and a solution to this debilitating disease has been sought for over a decade. Antibiotics are the currently accepted therapeutic measure, but are not an effective treatment due to the asymptomatic nature of some infections and a low efficacy rate. Thus, a vaccine would be an ideal way to address this infectious disease threat in the wild. Previous vaccine trials have used a three-dose regimen; however this is very difficult to apply in the field as it would require multiple capture events, which are stressful and invasive processes for the koala. In addition, it requires skilled koala handlers and a significant monetary investment. To overcome these challenges, in this study we utilized a polyphosphazine based poly I:C and a host defense peptide adjuvant combined with recombinant chlamydial major outer membrane protein (rMOMP) antigen to induce long lasting (54 weeks) cellular and humoral immunity in female koalas with a novel single immunizing dose. Immunized koalas produced a strong IgG response in plasma, as well as at mucosal sites. Moreover, they showed high levels of C. pecorum specific neutralizing antibodies in the plasma as well as vaginal and conjunctival secretions. Lastly, Chlamydia-specific lymphocyte proliferation responses were produced against both whole chlamydial elementary bodies and rMOMP protein, over the 12-month period. The results of this study suggest that a single dose rMOMP vaccine incorporating a poly I:C, host defense peptide and polyphosphazine adjuvant is able to stimulate both arms of the immune system in koalas, thereby providing an alternative to antibiotic treatment and/or a three-dose vaccine regime.


Charlton B.D.,University of Vienna | Ellis W.A.H.,University of Queensland | McKinnon A.J.,Moggill Koala Hospital | Cowin G.J.,University of Queensland | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Experimental Biology | Year: 2011

Determining the information content of vocal signals and understanding morphological modifications of vocal anatomy are key steps towards revealing the selection pressures acting on a given species' vocal communication system. Here, we used a combination of acoustic and anatomical data to investigate whether male koala bellows provide reliable information on the caller's body size, and to confirm whether male koalas have a permanently descended larynx. Our results indicate that the spectral prominences of male koala bellows are formants (vocal tract resonances), and show that larger males have lower formant spacing. In contrast, no relationship between body size and the fundamental frequency was found. Anatomical investigations revealed that male koalas have a permanently descended larynx: the first example of this in a marsupial. Furthermore, we found a deeply anchored sternothyroid muscle that could allow male koalas to retract their larynx into the thorax. While this would explain the low formant spacing of the exhalation and initial inhalation phases of male bellows, further research will be required to reveal the anatomical basis for the formant spacing of the later inhalation phases, which is predictive of vocal tract lengths of around 50cm (nearly the length of an adult koala's body). Taken together, these findings show that the formant spacing of male koala bellows has the potential to provide receivers with reliable information on the caller's body size, and reveal that vocal adaptations allowing callers to exaggerate (or maximise) the acoustic impression of their size have evolved independently in marsupials and placental mammals. © 2011. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.


Charlton B.D.,University of Vienna | Ellis W.A.H.,Central Queensland University | Brumm J.,Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary | Nilsson K.,Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary | Fitch W.T.,University of Vienna
Animal Behaviour | Year: 2012

Despite an extensive literature on the role of acoustic cues in mate choice little is known about the specific vocal traits that female mammals prefer. We used resynthesis techniques and playback experiments to examine the behavioural responses of oestrous female koalas, Phascolarctos cinereus, to male bellows in which a specific acoustic cue to body size, the formants, were modified to simulate callers of different body size. Oestrous females looked longer towards, and spent more time in close proximity to, loudspeakers broadcasting bellows simulating larger male koalas. These findings suggest that female koalas use formants (key components of human speech) to select larger males as mating partners, and represent the first evidence of a marsupial mating preference based on a vocal signal. More generally, these results indicate that intersexual selection pressures to lower formants and exaggerate size are present in a marsupial species, raising interesting questions about the evolutionary origins of formant perception. © 2012 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.


Charlton B.D.,University of Vienna | Ellis W.A.H.,University of Queensland | McKinnon A.J.,Moggill Koala Hospital | Brumm J.,Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary | And 2 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

The ability to signal individual identity using vocal signals and distinguish between conspecifics based on vocal cues is important in several mammal species. Furthermore, it can be important for receivers to differentiate between callers in reproductive contexts. In this study, we used acoustic analyses to determine whether male koala bellows are individually distinctive and to investigate the relative importance of different acoustic features for coding individuality. We then used a habituation-discrimination paradigm to investigate whether koalas discriminate between the bellow vocalisations of different male callers. Our results show that male koala bellows are highly individualized, and indicate that cues related to vocal tract filtering contribute the most to vocal identity. In addition, we found that male and female koalas habituated to the bellows of a specific male showed a significant dishabituation when they were presented with bellows from a novel male. The significant reduction in behavioural response to a final rehabituation playback shows this was not a chance rebound in response levels. Our findings indicate that male koala bellows are highly individually distinctive and that the identity of male callers is functionally relevant to male and female koalas during the breeding season. We go on to discuss the biological relevance of signalling identity in this species' sexual communication and the potential practical implications of our findings for acoustic monitoring of male population levels. © 2011 Charlton et al.

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