London, United Kingdom

London South Bank University

www.lsbu.ac.uk
London, United Kingdom

London South Bank University is a public university located in Southwark, London, United Kingdom. It has over 19,000 students and 1,700 staff, and is based in the London Borough of Southwark, near the South Bank of the River Thames, from which it takes its name.Founded from charitable donations in 1892 as the "Borough Polytechnic Institute", it absorbed several other local colleges in the 1970s and 1990s, and achieved university status in 1992. LSBU is a post-1992 or new university.The current Chancellor is investor Richard Farleigh and their Vice-Chancellor is Prof David Phoenix. Wikipedia.

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The CryoHub innovation project will investigate and extend the potential of large-scale Cryogenic Energy Storage (CES) and will apply the stored energy for both cooling and energy generation. By employing Renewable Energy Sources (RES) to liquefy and store cryogens, CryoHub will balance the power grid, while meeting the cooling demand of a refrigerated food warehouse and recovering the waste heat from its equipment and components. The intermittent supply is a major obstacle to the RES power market. In reality, RES are fickle forces, prone to over-producing when demand is low and failing to meet requirements when demand peaks. Europe is about to generate 20% of its required energy from RES by 2020, so that the proper RES integration poses continent-wide challenges. The Cryogenic Energy Storage (CES), and particularly the Liquid Air Energy Storage (LAES), is a promising technology enabling on-site storage of RES energy during periods of high generation and its use at peak grid demand. Thus, CES acts as Grid Energy Storage (GES), where cryogen is boiled to drive a turbine and to restore electricity to the grid. To date, CES applications have been rather limited by the poor round trip efficiency (ratio between energies spent for and retrieved from energy storage) due to unrecovered energy losses. The CryoHub project is therefore designed to maximise the CES efficiency by recovering energy from cooling and heating in a perfect RES-driven cycle of cryogen liquefaction, storage, distribution and efficient use. Refrigerated warehouses for chilled and frozen food commodities are large electricity consumers, possess powerful installed capacities for cooling and heating and waste substantial amounts of heat. Such facilities provide the ideal industrial environment to advance and demonstrate the LAES benefits. CryoHub will thus resolve most of the above-mentioned problems at one go, thereby paving the way for broader market prospects for CES-based technologies across Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: FTIPilot-1-2015 | Award Amount: 2.83M | Year: 2016

It is estimated that 20% of storage tank accidents are caused by cracks or raptures on the tank structure. The majority of the bulk liquids stored in these tanks include crude oil and derived products which are extremely hazardous to the environment; a spill of only one gallon of oil can contaminate a million gallons of water. Storage tank NDT inspection is very costly and degrading to the environment. Tank operators need to clear and vent the tank in order for human inspectors to enter it; a process that takes approximately 4 weeks and costs more than 500k while it causes hazardous gases to be released into the atmosphere. There is currently no inspection solution allowing for low-cost and 100% surface tank inspection. It is this gap that gives rise to unique business opportunity which InnotecUK (Dynamic robotic NDT solution provider), Technic-Control and Integrity NDT (Leading NDT instrument and service providers) aspire to seize with the aid of TWI (World-class NDT technique research organization) and LSBIC (Leading robotic control research institute). Our vision is clear; we aim to redefine storage tank NDT inspection by commercializing TankRob, a leading-edge NDT inspection robot capable of in-service operation and 100% surface coverage thanks to a specially designed surface changing mechanism. TankRobs operation has already been demonstrated in water tanks and its performance indicates tremendous potential. We now need to finalize the systems commercial version, obtain the necessary certifications and validate its performance in oil storage tanks. Our primary target customers will be large storage tank operators and SME NDT service providers initially in European, Asian and Middle-eastern markets. To this end we have come together as a consortium pursuing 3m funding. Our goal is to grow our businesses by 202.86m in gross sales resulting 39.47m of profit over the 10 years after our products market launch, translating to a total amount of 897 new jobs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: FTIPilot-1-2015 | Award Amount: 2.75M | Year: 2016

To achieve a thorough investigation for defect presence on a wind turbine blade, close inspection is required. This implies either trained staff tied with ropes on the blade or dismantling and transferring the blade in a workshop environment. While blade dismantling is scarcely used because it requires very long downtime, human inspection also involve a relatively high delay. A solution to this problem is to utilize specially designed platforms that can reach the blade and implement faster inspections on site. However, current systems are not very agile or cannot reach close enough to the blade in order to use a high quality nondestructive technique. Hence, they are mostly used to carry out mere visual inspections. To deal with the aforementioned challenge, our team will commercialize WInspector. WInspector consists of an agile robotic platform able to climb up the wind turbine tower and deploy an advanced Digital Shearography kit that carries out the inspection of a blade at a depth of up to 50mm. Users of WInspector benefit through early detecting emerging defects unseen in a visual inspection performed by competing solutions, with a significantly lower downtime for the WTB, and free of dangerous human labor. We have tested and validated the capabilities of WInspector in relevant environment and based on feedback received by wind farm operators, including project participant Gamesa and Iberdola (who has supported us in writing for this application), we are now ready to take the next steps and complete product development allowing us to bring WInspector into the market. Our vision is to grow our businesses by 19.88 million in gross sales by 2023 and keep growing at 58.8% annually from 2023 onwards. Through our business growth, we will create 181 new jobs. It is our strong belief that the Fast Track to Innovation Pilot is the ideal financial instrument for us to accelerate the procedures required for commercialization.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: FTIPilot-01-2016 | Award Amount: 3.04M | Year: 2016

This action will bring to market a unique product, RiserSure, for assessing the condition of flexible riser pipes widely used in offshore oil and gas production. Riser failure is increasing and is costly (3M per day from lost production alone). It damages the environment and creates the potential for major incidents. The Gulf of Mexico disaster in 2010 prompted very recent new safety legislation in the US and Europe (2015 US offshore safety drilling rule, 2013 EU Offshore Safety Directive). This is driving the uptake of non-destructive testing (NDT) to monitor riser condition. Current techniques cannot reliably or efficiently assess flexible riser condition to provide advance warning of failure. Radiography is ideal as it penetrates all the layers in the pipe. However, current systems are designed for on-shore applications, not sub-sea. The objective of this action is to take to market RiserSure, which uses a novel subsea digital radiography detector. We will take the technology from TRL6 to TRL9 by optimising it for operation on flexible risers and adapting it to the needs of our customers the NDT service providers and asset operators. Sub-sea field trials will demonstrate customer benefits. Within this 24 month project we will complete commercial and manufacturing preparations for product launch and lay the foundations for growth. RiserSure will reduce the environmental impact and improve the safety of offshore production. It will improve the profitability of operators by reducing leaks and downtime, saving the industry 270M over 5 years. It will develop new revenues of 90M with a profit of 50M cumulative within 5 years of the end of the action; creating 139 new jobs for the SME led the consortium and an ROI of 148:1. Our industry-led consortium is requesting an EU contribution of 2,521,892 reflecting the costly nature of offshore testing, and our ambitious plans to achieve successful and rapid commercialisation of RiserSure.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CS2-IA | Phase: JTI-CS2-2014-CFP01-LPA-02-05 | Award Amount: 699.64K | Year: 2016

Fire suppression and explosion protection have used halons in many applications because they are electrically nonconductive, dissipate rapidly without residue, are safe for limited human exposure, and are extremely efficient in extinguishing most types of fires. However they have a very strong Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP). The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was designed to reduce the production and consumption of ozone depleting substances in order to reduce their abundance in the atmosphere, and thereby protect the earths fragile ozone Layer. Many international organisations like the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) have mandated earliest production and import phaseout of halons. Substitutes are reviewed on the basis of ozone depletion potential, global warming potential, toxicity, flammability, and exposure potential. The EFFICIENT project will investigate the use of environmentally friendly agents like water mist spray, inert gas flooding etc. and undertake extensive investigation of their fire suppression effectiveness and extinguishing concentration. It will also establish the agent distribution profile over time at standard atmospheric conditions. Based on the inputs from these investigations, the project will design a suitable fire suppression system for cargo holds of aircraft which are reliable, consistent and safe. A demonstrator will be developed to test the fire suppression system in accordance with the full scale fire tests prescribed by the minimum performance standards promulgated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The project will deliver technology at a maturity of TRL 6.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 96.31K | Year: 2015

To design, develop and manufacture a novel Fuel Property Measurement Assembly product to provide real time fuel parameter data to deliver fuel efficiency savings to the aerospace industry


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 886.50K | Year: 2017

A revelation in todays mobile is networks is SON (Self-Organizing technology) technology, which is seen as a playing pivotal role towards reducing the management costs of networks. In legacy networks, still many network elements and associated parameters are manually configured. The associated operations costs are significant. Specialized expertise must be maintained to tune these network parameters, and the existing manual process is time-consuming and potentially error-prone. In addition, this manual tuning process inherently results in comparatively long delays in updating values in response to the often rapidly changing network topologies and operating conditions, resulting in sub-optimal network performance. SON is capable of collecting information from the network, so as to perform self-configuration, self-optimization, self-healing and etc, so as to reduce the operation cost through less human involvement, and to optimize the service quality through robust and prompt network optimization. In this proposal, we aim to drive further cost savings in the way networks are managed today by amplifying further the coverage zone of SON within the network. We believe that key technologies such as network sharing and Coordinated Multipoint (CoMP) can benefit from SON technology solutions. We will consider a complex context-aware heterogeneous network that is slowly becoming a 5G reality, and investigate the notion of SON CoMP and SO network sharing, as key technologies to reduce cost and energy per bit in legacy and future emerging mobile technologies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 195.45K | Year: 2016

Over the past decade, worsening affordability,homelessness, social and housing polarisation and new forms of housing deprivation have been an increasing concern for public policy in Europe. Symptom of this problem is a set of art projects focused on housing issues. These social art projects have also served to highlight and fill the gap left by inexistent social structures, which should ideally provide wellbeing for all. The art projects about housing paired with other initiatives coming from civil society (as non-governmental organizations with social and humanitarian foundation, social entrepreneurship, and volunteer based social initiatives) have a potential to engage citizens creatively and initiate positive social change by increasing wellbeing and community feeling. Addressing this need, the overarching objective of this project is to deliver a new methodology that will address Social Art and Housing. This methodology will allow the Fellow to outline the best practice for how art can be used in housing planning, for enhancing the quality of life in decaying neighborhoods, in urban regenerations, and homelessness problems. To achieve this objective the project will bring together a talented researcher with a background in art and urban theory to work with an internationally recognized research group with expertise in actor network theory, social art and field research design in order to deliver a novel interdisciplinary methodology developed through empirical research and validated through case studies in the UK and Serbia. The following research objectives will deliver the key components of the new social art and housing methodology: Objective 1: to map actors in the field of social art and housing networks Objective 2: to develop models of best practices of social art and housing networks Objective 3: to refine the models through comparison of best practices in Serbia and UK The research will be divided in six stages organized in six work packages.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2014-EF | Award Amount: 183.45K | Year: 2015

The workings of globalization depend on international labor migration, a phenomenon that is hardly recent but that is, instead, embedded in histories of colonialism, decolonization and neocolonization, divergent conditions of democracy, totalitarianism, militarism and exploitation, as well as in persistent structures of economic disparity among the formal colonial powers and the decolonized world. Contemporary labor migrationthe flows of people in search of labor crossing national boundaries, deeply impacts and transforms the social, economic, political, cognitive and affective landscapes of contemporary life. This project will consider these transformations by examining the transnational migrant labor of workers from Romania such as it unfolds at two central sites of global capitalism, London-U.K. and New York-U.S. The research will feature an historical analysis of the immigrant Romanian labor presence at these sites, while its time frame covers the interval starting in 1989 up to the present day. While labor migration has been a subject of interest for economists, political theorists, geographers, anthropologists and cultural theorists alike, its relevance to affective theory and neoliberal critiques have only recently been addressed. My project seeks to address an analytic gap that refers to the affective dimension of migrational labor by considering not only the economic, political, and historical contexts, but also the impact that immigrants transnational journeys in search for work and their landing in new spaces have on their intimate lives alongside co-nationals as well as alongside other dwellers in the global city. The research project will draw upon recent global changes, more precisely on the global economic crisis, the continued neoliberalization of economies and the pressures towards securitization that affect the cities of London and New York and thus implicitly impact on the lives of immigrant laborers.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 34.83K | Year: 2017

This research tests the effectiveness of post-diaspora as a new concept and analytic tool. It asks how this concept can be used to reimagine new means by which African-Caribbean women achieve agency through mobility in twenty-first century contexts of globalization, transnationalism and deterritorialization. Post-diaspora is neither a departure from, nor a continuation of contemporary usages of diaspora: rather the post signals a new problem space that allows us to imagine new futures, by focusing on mobility both as a defining feature of Caribbean identities and as a route to self-fashioning for African-Caribbean women. Rather than linear journeys that result in the reconstitution of a remembered past in a present of new physical and cultural geographies, post-diasporic journeys are rhizomatic: they radically configure the assumed significance of home and away. In rhizomatic journeys, roots are provisional and unfixed. Routes are often circuitous, and return - physical, rhetorical and economic - is a key component of African-Caribbean womens mobility (Trotz 2006; Trotz and Malone 2013; Reynolds 208, 2010). While contemporary engagements with concepts of diaspora emphasise loss of origin, displacement, genealogies of dispossession (Boyarin and Boyarin 2002; Cho2007), the formulation post-diaspora moves away from ideas of homeland as singular and discrete, and from the accompanying idea that feelings of longing constitute the diasporic subject. As a concept, it intervenes in attempts in contemporary scholarship to progress discussions of the African diaspora beyond the privileging of nationalist sensibilities and an exaggerated attention to belonging (Rushdy 2009), to more mobile and enabling articulations of blackness. It is a reimagining of affiliated identities beyond those that pertain to the nation state (Gilroy 2004, 2011; Hall 2007). Caribbean and African-Caribbean communities in North America, Britain and elsewhere are both twice diasporised (Hall 1976), and in the process of onward and recursive migrations, they are reconstituted by different and more variegated encounters (Cohen 2009). The concept of post-diaspora is attentive to the consequences of multiple encounters and the possibility of diverse affiliations. This transdisciplinary Network uses knowledge and resources of five disciplinary areas: gender studies, literature, sociology, cultural geography and history. The Network also facilitates a trans-historical and transnational dialogue on the theme of post-diaspora. It connects scholars from Britain, the Caribbean and North America, who bring their own theoretical, methodological and disciplinary processes to answer the following questions: 1. What does present research tell us about how Britain, the Caribbean and North America can be understood in post-diaspora contexts? 2. What are the gender dimensions of post-diaspora for African Caribbean women, with its emphasis on multi-directional mobility and instability? 3) How do these non-linear forms of mobility and the production of multiple affiliations produce the conditions for African-Caribbean womens agency and self-fashioning? 4) What forms of expression are available to reconfigure identities as post-diasporic? These questions will be addressed through a website archiving the Networks activities and hosted by London South Bank University; a series of short research meetings and seminars of invited international scholars; an edited collection for a special issue of the interdisciplinary journal Small Axe and selected contributions to Diaspora: a Journal of Transnational Studies; a one-day policy dialogue between members of the Network and the International Migration Taskforce, Planning Institute of Jamaica; two creative platforms of invited practitioners whose work addresses the theme; a meeting with the curators of the Black Cultural Archives, London.

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