Logistics Health Incorporated

United States

Logistics Health Incorporated

United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Sakthivel S.K.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Sakthivel S.K.,Logistics Health Incorporated | Whitaker B.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Whitaker B.,Atlanta Research and Education Foundation | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Virological Methods | Year: 2012

Fast-track Diagnostics respiratory pathogens (FTDRP) multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay was compared with in-house singleplex real-time RT-PCR assays for detection of 16 common respiratory viruses. The FTDRP assay correctly identified 26 diverse respiratory virus strains, 35 of 41 (85%) external quality assessment samples spiked with cultured virus and 232 of 263 (88%) archived respiratory specimens that tested positive for respiratory viruses by in-house assays. Of 308 prospectively tested respiratory specimens selected from children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness, 270 (87.7%) and 265 (86%) were positive by FTDRP and in-house assays for one or more viruses, respectively, with combined test results showing good concordance (K=0.812, 95% CI = 0.786-0.838). Individual FTDRP assays for adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus showed the lowest comparative sensitivities with in-house assays, with most discrepancies occurring with specimens containing low virus loads and failed to detect some rhinovirus strains, even when abundant. The FTDRP enterovirus and human bocavirus assays appeared to be more sensitive than the in-house assays with some specimens. With the exceptions noted above, most FTDRP assays performed comparably with in-house assays for most viruses while offering enhanced throughput and easy integration by laboratories using conventional real-time PCR instrumentation. © 2012.


Duderstadt S.K.,National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases | Duderstadt S.K.,Logistics Health Incorporated | Rose C.E.,National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases | Real T.M.,National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases | And 11 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2012

Aims/hypothesis: To evaluate whether vaccination increases the risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus in active component U.S. military personnel. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study among active component U.S. military personnel age 17-35 years. Individuals with first time diagnoses of type 1 diabetes between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2008 were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. We used Poisson regression to estimate risk ratios between individual vaccine exposures and type 1 diabetes. Secondary analyses were performed controlling for receipt of multiple vaccines and available demographic variables. Results: Our study population consisted of 2,385,102 individuals followed for approximately 7,644,098 person-years of service. This included 1074 incident type 1 diabetes cases. We observed no significant increased risk of type 1 diabetes after vaccination with anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) [RR = 1.00; 95% CI (0.85, 1.17)], smallpox vaccine [RR = 0.84; 95% (CI 0.70, 1.01)], typhoid vaccine [RR = 1.03; 95% CI (0.87, 1.22)], hepatitis B vaccine [RR = 0.83; 95% CI (0.72, 0.95)], measles mumps rubella vaccine (MMR) [RR = 0.71, 95% CI (0.61, 0.83)], or yellow fever vaccine [RR = 0.70; 95% CI (0.59, 0.82)]. Conclusions: We did not find an increased risk of diagnosed type 1 diabetes and any of the study vaccines. We recommend that follow-up studies using medical record review to confirm case status should be considered to corroborate these findings. © 2011.

Loading Logistics Health Incorporated collaborators
Loading Logistics Health Incorporated collaborators