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EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J., May 03, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Two outstanding seniors from Manchester Township High School in Manchester, N.J., have been selected as the 2017 recipients of the Arête Scholarship.  Christina Batista and John Davern will be recognized for their accomplishments during the New Jersey Hall of Fame (NJHOF) Induction Ceremony on May 7, at Convention Hall in Asbury Park, N.J. This is the second year that the New Jersey Hall of Fame has partnered with the New Jersey Education Association to present the Arête Scholarship, which awards each recipient a $5,000 scholarship.  Arête is an ancient Greek term that means, “reaching your highest human potential.”  The scholarship recognizes and rewards students who strive to pursue their passions in life, overcome the obstacles along the way and achieve their highest sense of self. “The recipients of these scholarships exhibit a sense of Jersey pride, and the willingness to go above and beyond. They show academic engagement, moral character and a commitment to their community,” said Steve Edwards, President of the NJHOF Foundation Board. “These students truly demonstrate focus in school and life, and have a well thought out plan on how they intend to succeed in the future.” “It is truly an honor to be selected,” said John Davern. “But what is more amazing is that two students from the same high school were both selected for this prestigious award.” Christina Batista added, “I am really happy we got to put Manchester on the map.” Both are nervous about being a part of the New Jersey Hall of Fame Ceremony which will feature the induction of: Kelly Ripa, Carol Higgins Clark, Connie Chung, Ray Liotta, Tommy James, Wyclef Jean, Rosey Grier, Chuck Wepner, Carol Blazejowski, Alfred Koeppe, Arthur Imperatore, Sr., Peace Pilgrim, and Philip Kearny. “Honestly, it is a little scary, but it will be exciting to be on stage with all those amazing people,” said Davern. “I am so excited and honored to be a part of this community and to see the excellence that is happening in the state. I am really blown away!” said Batista. Davern, age 17, is an avid sports fan, athlete and honor student. He is senior class president and is actively involved in Student Government.  In addition to maintaining a perfect 4.0 grade point average he has achieved MVP status on the Indoor Track, Outdoor Track and Cross Country Teams. Being involved in the local community is also important to Davern, who mentors middle school students about issues such as bullying and drugs/alcohol as part of the Heroes and Cool Kids Club. He also coaches Manchester Little League. “Seeing things from the coach’s perspective really gave me new insight,” said Davern. “When I was young, I thought I was just learning how to play the sport.  I didn’t realize the coaches were actually teaching us skills like teamwork, communication and leadership.  I like being able to pass that on to the kids.” Davern plans to attend Lock Haven University this fall to study Sports Management. He also aspires to write a sports blog for a sports network or print publication.  His ultimate goal is to work for NASCAR in management or marketing. “This scholarship will allow me to focus on my school work and to spend more time getting involved with the college community,” he said. “I didn’t know what Arête meant until I started researching it, and it really opened my eyes. To live with Arête is the knowledge that you can and will be successful - if you want to be successful; which is something I have followed my whole life.” Batista, age 17, is an outgoing honors student who loves the performing arts. She is secretary of the National Honor Society and proudly notes that she has performed in every Drama Club production over the past four years. She is also a featured member and section leader of the Cantante Honors Choir.  Batista’s other passions include volunteering and working with young people. She volunteers as a mentor in the Heroes and Cool Kids Club and serves as a teacher’s assistant for Religious Education Programs at St. Johns Roman Catholic Church in Lakehurst, N.J. She also assists children with reading as a library tutor at the Ocean County Library. “It is wonderful to help youth grow and learn and to teach them invaluable skills. At the library I taught children how to read and to see them flourish is really amazing,” said Batista, who also volunteers for the American Red Cross school blood drive. “It is always important to give back.  I volunteer because I want to make my community a better place.” Batista said she wasn’t familiar with the term Arête before applying for the scholarship, but found that it describes the essence of who she is. “The concept is something that has been passed down in my family from my grandparents to my parents to me. It means being a passionate, focused individual that works hard to achieve success, and I believe I exemplify those qualities,” she noted. Batista plans to study business administration and marketing at the Silberman College of Business at Fairleigh Dickinson University this fall. “I see myself as a future leader of a Fortune 500 company, taking my place among the ranks of other accomplished women who have broken through the glass ceiling.” According to Edwards, the New Jersey Hall of Fame was created to honor the Garden State’s most distinguished citizens, people who are powerful role models, especially for the young people in our state. “This scholarship is important for us to be involved with because the NJHOF is dedicated to serving as source of inspiration and motivation for young people to strive for, and to achieve, excellence in any endeavor they pursue,” said Edwards. The New Jersey Hall of Fame (NJHOF) is a non-profit organization with two boards working collaboratively – the NJHOF Board of Commissioners and the NJHOF Foundation Board of Trustees. The NJHOF honors citizens who have made invaluable contributions to society, the State of New Jersey, and the world beyond. Since 2008, more than 100 notable individuals and groups have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. The NJ Hall of Fame endeavors to present school children with significant role models to show that they can and should strive for excellence. Outreach through the New Jersey Hall of Fame Mobile Museum and the NJHOF Curriculum Guide for educators focuses on the importance of voting, the qualities of effective leadership, and inductee research. For more information on the NJHOF, its mission and inductees, go to www.njhalloffame.org. To view past induction ceremonies, visit the NJ Hall of Fame YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/NJHoF.


EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J., May 03, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Two outstanding seniors from Manchester Township High School in Manchester, N.J., have been selected as the 2017 recipients of the Arête Scholarship.  Christina Batista and John Davern will be recognized for their accomplishments during the New Jersey Hall of Fame (NJHOF) Induction Ceremony on May 7, at Convention Hall in Asbury Park, N.J. This is the second year that the New Jersey Hall of Fame has partnered with the New Jersey Education Association to present the Arête Scholarship, which awards each recipient a $5,000 scholarship.  Arête is an ancient Greek term that means, “reaching your highest human potential.”  The scholarship recognizes and rewards students who strive to pursue their passions in life, overcome the obstacles along the way and achieve their highest sense of self. “The recipients of these scholarships exhibit a sense of Jersey pride, and the willingness to go above and beyond. They show academic engagement, moral character and a commitment to their community,” said Steve Edwards, President of the NJHOF Foundation Board. “These students truly demonstrate focus in school and life, and have a well thought out plan on how they intend to succeed in the future.” “It is truly an honor to be selected,” said John Davern. “But what is more amazing is that two students from the same high school were both selected for this prestigious award.” Christina Batista added, “I am really happy we got to put Manchester on the map.” Both are nervous about being a part of the New Jersey Hall of Fame Ceremony which will feature the induction of: Kelly Ripa, Carol Higgins Clark, Connie Chung, Ray Liotta, Tommy James, Wyclef Jean, Rosey Grier, Chuck Wepner, Carol Blazejowski, Alfred Koeppe, Arthur Imperatore, Sr., Peace Pilgrim, and Philip Kearny. “Honestly, it is a little scary, but it will be exciting to be on stage with all those amazing people,” said Davern. “I am so excited and honored to be a part of this community and to see the excellence that is happening in the state. I am really blown away!” said Batista. Davern, age 17, is an avid sports fan, athlete and honor student. He is senior class president and is actively involved in Student Government.  In addition to maintaining a perfect 4.0 grade point average he has achieved MVP status on the Indoor Track, Outdoor Track and Cross Country Teams. Being involved in the local community is also important to Davern, who mentors middle school students about issues such as bullying and drugs/alcohol as part of the Heroes and Cool Kids Club. He also coaches Manchester Little League. “Seeing things from the coach’s perspective really gave me new insight,” said Davern. “When I was young, I thought I was just learning how to play the sport.  I didn’t realize the coaches were actually teaching us skills like teamwork, communication and leadership.  I like being able to pass that on to the kids.” Davern plans to attend Lock Haven University this fall to study Sports Management. He also aspires to write a sports blog for a sports network or print publication.  His ultimate goal is to work for NASCAR in management or marketing. “This scholarship will allow me to focus on my school work and to spend more time getting involved with the college community,” he said. “I didn’t know what Arête meant until I started researching it, and it really opened my eyes. To live with Arête is the knowledge that you can and will be successful - if you want to be successful; which is something I have followed my whole life.” Batista, age 17, is an outgoing honors student who loves the performing arts. She is secretary of the National Honor Society and proudly notes that she has performed in every Drama Club production over the past four years. She is also a featured member and section leader of the Cantante Honors Choir.  Batista’s other passions include volunteering and working with young people. She volunteers as a mentor in the Heroes and Cool Kids Club and serves as a teacher’s assistant for Religious Education Programs at St. Johns Roman Catholic Church in Lakehurst, N.J. She also assists children with reading as a library tutor at the Ocean County Library. “It is wonderful to help youth grow and learn and to teach them invaluable skills. At the library I taught children how to read and to see them flourish is really amazing,” said Batista, who also volunteers for the American Red Cross school blood drive. “It is always important to give back.  I volunteer because I want to make my community a better place.” Batista said she wasn’t familiar with the term Arête before applying for the scholarship, but found that it describes the essence of who she is. “The concept is something that has been passed down in my family from my grandparents to my parents to me. It means being a passionate, focused individual that works hard to achieve success, and I believe I exemplify those qualities,” she noted. Batista plans to study business administration and marketing at the Silberman College of Business at Fairleigh Dickinson University this fall. “I see myself as a future leader of a Fortune 500 company, taking my place among the ranks of other accomplished women who have broken through the glass ceiling.” According to Edwards, the New Jersey Hall of Fame was created to honor the Garden State’s most distinguished citizens, people who are powerful role models, especially for the young people in our state. “This scholarship is important for us to be involved with because the NJHOF is dedicated to serving as source of inspiration and motivation for young people to strive for, and to achieve, excellence in any endeavor they pursue,” said Edwards. The New Jersey Hall of Fame (NJHOF) is a non-profit organization with two boards working collaboratively – the NJHOF Board of Commissioners and the NJHOF Foundation Board of Trustees. The NJHOF honors citizens who have made invaluable contributions to society, the State of New Jersey, and the world beyond. Since 2008, more than 100 notable individuals and groups have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. The NJ Hall of Fame endeavors to present school children with significant role models to show that they can and should strive for excellence. Outreach through the New Jersey Hall of Fame Mobile Museum and the NJHOF Curriculum Guide for educators focuses on the importance of voting, the qualities of effective leadership, and inductee research. For more information on the NJHOF, its mission and inductees, go to www.njhalloffame.org. To view past induction ceremonies, visit the NJ Hall of Fame YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/NJHoF.


EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J., May 03, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Two outstanding seniors from Manchester Township High School in Manchester, N.J., have been selected as the 2017 recipients of the Arête Scholarship.  Christina Batista and John Davern will be recognized for their accomplishments during the New Jersey Hall of Fame (NJHOF) Induction Ceremony on May 7, at Convention Hall in Asbury Park, N.J. This is the second year that the New Jersey Hall of Fame has partnered with the New Jersey Education Association to present the Arête Scholarship, which awards each recipient a $5,000 scholarship.  Arête is an ancient Greek term that means, “reaching your highest human potential.”  The scholarship recognizes and rewards students who strive to pursue their passions in life, overcome the obstacles along the way and achieve their highest sense of self. “The recipients of these scholarships exhibit a sense of Jersey pride, and the willingness to go above and beyond. They show academic engagement, moral character and a commitment to their community,” said Steve Edwards, President of the NJHOF Foundation Board. “These students truly demonstrate focus in school and life, and have a well thought out plan on how they intend to succeed in the future.” “It is truly an honor to be selected,” said John Davern. “But what is more amazing is that two students from the same high school were both selected for this prestigious award.” Christina Batista added, “I am really happy we got to put Manchester on the map.” Both are nervous about being a part of the New Jersey Hall of Fame Ceremony which will feature the induction of: Kelly Ripa, Carol Higgins Clark, Connie Chung, Ray Liotta, Tommy James, Wyclef Jean, Rosey Grier, Chuck Wepner, Carol Blazejowski, Alfred Koeppe, Arthur Imperatore, Sr., Peace Pilgrim, and Philip Kearny. “Honestly, it is a little scary, but it will be exciting to be on stage with all those amazing people,” said Davern. “I am so excited and honored to be a part of this community and to see the excellence that is happening in the state. I am really blown away!” said Batista. Davern, age 17, is an avid sports fan, athlete and honor student. He is senior class president and is actively involved in Student Government.  In addition to maintaining a perfect 4.0 grade point average he has achieved MVP status on the Indoor Track, Outdoor Track and Cross Country Teams. Being involved in the local community is also important to Davern, who mentors middle school students about issues such as bullying and drugs/alcohol as part of the Heroes and Cool Kids Club. He also coaches Manchester Little League. “Seeing things from the coach’s perspective really gave me new insight,” said Davern. “When I was young, I thought I was just learning how to play the sport.  I didn’t realize the coaches were actually teaching us skills like teamwork, communication and leadership.  I like being able to pass that on to the kids.” Davern plans to attend Lock Haven University this fall to study Sports Management. He also aspires to write a sports blog for a sports network or print publication.  His ultimate goal is to work for NASCAR in management or marketing. “This scholarship will allow me to focus on my school work and to spend more time getting involved with the college community,” he said. “I didn’t know what Arête meant until I started researching it, and it really opened my eyes. To live with Arête is the knowledge that you can and will be successful - if you want to be successful; which is something I have followed my whole life.” Batista, age 17, is an outgoing honors student who loves the performing arts. She is secretary of the National Honor Society and proudly notes that she has performed in every Drama Club production over the past four years. She is also a featured member and section leader of the Cantante Honors Choir.  Batista’s other passions include volunteering and working with young people. She volunteers as a mentor in the Heroes and Cool Kids Club and serves as a teacher’s assistant for Religious Education Programs at St. Johns Roman Catholic Church in Lakehurst, N.J. She also assists children with reading as a library tutor at the Ocean County Library. “It is wonderful to help youth grow and learn and to teach them invaluable skills. At the library I taught children how to read and to see them flourish is really amazing,” said Batista, who also volunteers for the American Red Cross school blood drive. “It is always important to give back.  I volunteer because I want to make my community a better place.” Batista said she wasn’t familiar with the term Arête before applying for the scholarship, but found that it describes the essence of who she is. “The concept is something that has been passed down in my family from my grandparents to my parents to me. It means being a passionate, focused individual that works hard to achieve success, and I believe I exemplify those qualities,” she noted. Batista plans to study business administration and marketing at the Silberman College of Business at Fairleigh Dickinson University this fall. “I see myself as a future leader of a Fortune 500 company, taking my place among the ranks of other accomplished women who have broken through the glass ceiling.” According to Edwards, the New Jersey Hall of Fame was created to honor the Garden State’s most distinguished citizens, people who are powerful role models, especially for the young people in our state. “This scholarship is important for us to be involved with because the NJHOF is dedicated to serving as source of inspiration and motivation for young people to strive for, and to achieve, excellence in any endeavor they pursue,” said Edwards. The New Jersey Hall of Fame (NJHOF) is a non-profit organization with two boards working collaboratively – the NJHOF Board of Commissioners and the NJHOF Foundation Board of Trustees. The NJHOF honors citizens who have made invaluable contributions to society, the State of New Jersey, and the world beyond. Since 2008, more than 100 notable individuals and groups have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. The NJ Hall of Fame endeavors to present school children with significant role models to show that they can and should strive for excellence. Outreach through the New Jersey Hall of Fame Mobile Museum and the NJHOF Curriculum Guide for educators focuses on the importance of voting, the qualities of effective leadership, and inductee research. For more information on the NJHOF, its mission and inductees, go to www.njhalloffame.org. To view past induction ceremonies, visit the NJ Hall of Fame YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/NJHoF.


EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J., May 03, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Two outstanding seniors from Manchester Township High School in Manchester, N.J., have been selected as the 2017 recipients of the Arête Scholarship.  Christina Batista and John Davern will be recognized for their accomplishments during the New Jersey Hall of Fame (NJHOF) Induction Ceremony on May 7, at Convention Hall in Asbury Park, N.J. This is the second year that the New Jersey Hall of Fame has partnered with the New Jersey Education Association to present the Arête Scholarship, which awards each recipient a $5,000 scholarship.  Arête is an ancient Greek term that means, “reaching your highest human potential.”  The scholarship recognizes and rewards students who strive to pursue their passions in life, overcome the obstacles along the way and achieve their highest sense of self. “The recipients of these scholarships exhibit a sense of Jersey pride, and the willingness to go above and beyond. They show academic engagement, moral character and a commitment to their community,” said Steve Edwards, President of the NJHOF Foundation Board. “These students truly demonstrate focus in school and life, and have a well thought out plan on how they intend to succeed in the future.” “It is truly an honor to be selected,” said John Davern. “But what is more amazing is that two students from the same high school were both selected for this prestigious award.” Christina Batista added, “I am really happy we got to put Manchester on the map.” Both are nervous about being a part of the New Jersey Hall of Fame Ceremony which will feature the induction of: Kelly Ripa, Carol Higgins Clark, Connie Chung, Ray Liotta, Tommy James, Wyclef Jean, Rosey Grier, Chuck Wepner, Carol Blazejowski, Alfred Koeppe, Arthur Imperatore, Sr., Peace Pilgrim, and Philip Kearny. “Honestly, it is a little scary, but it will be exciting to be on stage with all those amazing people,” said Davern. “I am so excited and honored to be a part of this community and to see the excellence that is happening in the state. I am really blown away!” said Batista. Davern, age 17, is an avid sports fan, athlete and honor student. He is senior class president and is actively involved in Student Government.  In addition to maintaining a perfect 4.0 grade point average he has achieved MVP status on the Indoor Track, Outdoor Track and Cross Country Teams. Being involved in the local community is also important to Davern, who mentors middle school students about issues such as bullying and drugs/alcohol as part of the Heroes and Cool Kids Club. He also coaches Manchester Little League. “Seeing things from the coach’s perspective really gave me new insight,” said Davern. “When I was young, I thought I was just learning how to play the sport.  I didn’t realize the coaches were actually teaching us skills like teamwork, communication and leadership.  I like being able to pass that on to the kids.” Davern plans to attend Lock Haven University this fall to study Sports Management. He also aspires to write a sports blog for a sports network or print publication.  His ultimate goal is to work for NASCAR in management or marketing. “This scholarship will allow me to focus on my school work and to spend more time getting involved with the college community,” he said. “I didn’t know what Arête meant until I started researching it, and it really opened my eyes. To live with Arête is the knowledge that you can and will be successful - if you want to be successful; which is something I have followed my whole life.” Batista, age 17, is an outgoing honors student who loves the performing arts. She is secretary of the National Honor Society and proudly notes that she has performed in every Drama Club production over the past four years. She is also a featured member and section leader of the Cantante Honors Choir.  Batista’s other passions include volunteering and working with young people. She volunteers as a mentor in the Heroes and Cool Kids Club and serves as a teacher’s assistant for Religious Education Programs at St. Johns Roman Catholic Church in Lakehurst, N.J. She also assists children with reading as a library tutor at the Ocean County Library. “It is wonderful to help youth grow and learn and to teach them invaluable skills. At the library I taught children how to read and to see them flourish is really amazing,” said Batista, who also volunteers for the American Red Cross school blood drive. “It is always important to give back.  I volunteer because I want to make my community a better place.” Batista said she wasn’t familiar with the term Arête before applying for the scholarship, but found that it describes the essence of who she is. “The concept is something that has been passed down in my family from my grandparents to my parents to me. It means being a passionate, focused individual that works hard to achieve success, and I believe I exemplify those qualities,” she noted. Batista plans to study business administration and marketing at the Silberman College of Business at Fairleigh Dickinson University this fall. “I see myself as a future leader of a Fortune 500 company, taking my place among the ranks of other accomplished women who have broken through the glass ceiling.” According to Edwards, the New Jersey Hall of Fame was created to honor the Garden State’s most distinguished citizens, people who are powerful role models, especially for the young people in our state. “This scholarship is important for us to be involved with because the NJHOF is dedicated to serving as source of inspiration and motivation for young people to strive for, and to achieve, excellence in any endeavor they pursue,” said Edwards. The New Jersey Hall of Fame (NJHOF) is a non-profit organization with two boards working collaboratively – the NJHOF Board of Commissioners and the NJHOF Foundation Board of Trustees. The NJHOF honors citizens who have made invaluable contributions to society, the State of New Jersey, and the world beyond. Since 2008, more than 100 notable individuals and groups have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. The NJ Hall of Fame endeavors to present school children with significant role models to show that they can and should strive for excellence. Outreach through the New Jersey Hall of Fame Mobile Museum and the NJHOF Curriculum Guide for educators focuses on the importance of voting, the qualities of effective leadership, and inductee research. For more information on the NJHOF, its mission and inductees, go to www.njhalloffame.org. To view past induction ceremonies, visit the NJ Hall of Fame YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/NJHoF.


Junco R.,Lock Haven University | Cotten S.R.,University of Alabama at Birmingham
Computers and Education | Year: 2012

The proliferation and ease of access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) such as Facebook, text messaging.; instant messaging has resulted in ICT users being presented with more real-time streaming data than ever before. Unfortunately, this has also resulted in individuals increasingly engaging in multitasking as an information management strategy. The purpose of this study was to examine how college students multitask with ICTs and to determine the impacts of this multitasking on their college grade point average (GPA). Using web survey data from a large sample of college students at one university (N = 1839), we found that students reported spending a large amount of time using ICTs on a daily basis. Students reported frequently searching for content not related to courses, using Facebook, emailing, talking on their cell phones.; texting while doing schoolwork. Hierarchical (blocked) linear regression analyses revealed that using Facebook and texting while doing schoolwork were negatively associated with overall college GPA. Engaging in Facebook use or texting while trying to complete schoolwork may tax students' capacity for cognitive processing and preclude deeper learning. Our research indicates that the type and purpose of ICT use matters in terms of the educational impacts of multitasking. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Junco R.,Lock Haven University | Cotten S.R.,University of Alabama at Birmingham
Computers and Education | Year: 2011

College students use information and communication technologies at much higher levels and in different ways than prior generations. They are also more likely to multitask while using information and communication technologies. However, few studies have examined the impacts of multitasking on educational outcomes among students. This study fills a gap in this area by utilizing a large-sample web-based survey of college student technology usage to examine how instant messaging and multitasking affect perceived educational outcomes. Since multitasking can impede the learning process through a form of information overload, we explore possible predictors of academic impairment due to multitasking. Results of this study suggest that college students use instant messaging at high levels, they multitask while using instant messaging, and over half report that instant messaging has had a detrimental effect on their schoolwork. Higher levels of instant messaging and specific types of multitasking activities are associated with students reporting not getting schoolwork done due to instant messaging. We discuss implications of these findings for researchers studying the social impacts of technology and those in higher education administration. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Educators and others are interested in the effects of social media on college students, with a specific focus on the most popular social media website - Facebook. Two previous studies have examined the relationship between Facebook use and student engagement, a construct related to positive college outcomes. However, these studies were limited by their evaluation of Facebook usage and how they measured engagement. This paper fills a gap in the literature by using a large sample (N = 2368) of college students to examine the relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participation in Facebook activities, and student engagement. Student engagement was measured in three ways: a 19-item scale based on the National Survey of Student Engagement, time spent preparing for class, and time spent in co-curricular activities. Results indicate that Facebook use was significantly negatively predictive of engagement scale score and positively predictive of time spent in co-curricular activities. Additionally, some Facebook activities were positively predictive of the dependent variables, while others were negatively predictive. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Because of the social media platform's widespread adoption by college students, there is a great deal of interest in how Facebook use is related to academic performance. A small number of prior studies have examined the relationship between Facebook use and college grade point average (GPA); however, these studies have been limited by their measures, sampling designs and failure to include prior academic ability as a control variable. For instance, previous studies used non-continuous measures of time spent on Facebook and self-reported GPA. This paper fills a gap in the literature by using a large sample (N = 1839) of college students to examine the relationship among multiple measures of frequency of Facebook use, participation in Facebook activities, and time spent preparing for class and actual overall GPA. Hierarchical (blocked) linear regression analyses revealed that time spent on Facebook was strongly and significantly negatively related to overall GPA, while only weakly related to time spent preparing for class. Furthermore, using Facebook for collecting and sharing information was positively predictive of the outcome variables while using Facebook for socializing was negatively predictive. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Junco R.,Lock Haven University
Computers in Human Behavior | Year: 2012

The omnipresence of student-owned information and communication technologies (ICTs) in today's college classrooms presents educational opportunities but can also create learning problems. Specifically, multitasking with these technologies can interfere with the learning process. Indeed, research in cognitive science shows that there are clear performance decrements when trying to attend to two tasks at the same time. This study examines the frequency with which students multitask during class using a large sample (N = 1,839) and examines the relationship between multitasking and academic performance as measured by actual overall semester grade point average (GPA). Students reported frequently text messaging during class but reported multitasking with other ICTs to a lesser extent. Furthermore, only social technologies (Facebook and text messaging) were negatively related to GPA. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 590.30K | Year: 2011

The Nanoscience Scholars II program is providing scholarships and academic support to science students pursuing a baccalaureate in any science discipline, with either a minor in nanotechnology or a secondary associate of applied science in nanotechnology degree (in addition to the baccalaureate). The program uses nanoscale science and nanotechnology - exciting fields at the interface between disciplines to attract and engage new students. It builds on an NSF sponsored S-STEM program. This project is accomplishing two important goals. First, it is enabling the institution to thoroughly evaluate whether this strategy that focuses on interdisciplinary nanotechnology, intensive support through the Global Honors Program and the Nano Club science learning community, and increasingly independent research opportunities is an effective and replicable means to encourage more students to pursue education and careers in science and to help them succeed and graduate. Second, by enabling the institution to support additional cohorts of students for four years each, it is creating sufficient critical mass in terms of successful students and graduates over a long enough duration to institutionalize and sustain the program without external funding.

A new emphasis during this phase is on more intensive recruitment, focusing on high school guidance counselors in school districts with a high proportion of underrepresented and economically disadvantaged students. Scholarships are being determined by verified unmet need. Participants also receive a one-time scholarship for a Nanomanufacturing Technology Semester at the ATE Center at Penn State University. The Global Honors Program is helping students succeed through small, dynamic classes, a required first year seminar that introduces students to nanoscience and basic research and presentation skills, and the student directed Nano Club science learning community that helps support, motivate, and engage students throughout their undergraduate career. Optional opportunities to engage in meaningful research with faculty mentors involve students and arm them with the experience and motivation to pursue graduate education.

Intellectual Merit: Nanotechnology is inherently interdisciplinary. It offers opportunities for collaboration across disciplines and is an ideal focal point for attracting students to all sciences. The faculty Nanotechnology Group at the college supports students and models interdisciplinary collaboration. Science curricula require sequential acquisition of knowledge and skills along directed paths. Scholarships help students stay in college and in the sequences critical to success. The program features peer support and research opportunities, and provides the societal and implementation context that math and science courses often lack and are important factors in retaining underrepresented groups.

Broader Impacts: As lead institution in the Pennsylvania Collaborative for Applied Nanotechnology (PACAN), the college is situated to share experience and successes with other universities in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, more than half of which are also developing nanotechnology programs. If nanotechnology and nanoscale sciences prove a logical entry into all sciences, the project plans to encourage other small institutions in Pennsylvania and around the nation to replicate this model.

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