Chandler, AZ, United States
Chandler, AZ, United States

Local Motors is an American motor vehicle manufacturing company focused on low-volume manufacturing of open-source motor vehicle designs using multiple microfactories. They were founded in 2007 with headquarters in Phoenix, Arizona. Current products range from the Rally Fighter automobile and Racer motorcycle; through various electric bicycles, tricycles, and children's ride-on toy cars; to radio-controlled model cars and skateboards. They 3D print some components to the vehicles and toys they sell. Wikipedia.

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This report studies 3D Printing for Automotives in Global market, especially in North America, China, Europe, Southeast Asia, Japan and India, with production, revenue, consumption, import and export in these regions, from 2012 to 2016, and forecast to 2022. This report focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering 3D Systems Corporation Autodesk Arcam Stratasys Voxeljet Exone Hoganas Optomec Local Motors Ponoko By types, the market can be split into Metal/Metal-Alloy 3D Printing Automotives Polymer 3D Printing Automotives Other By Application, the market can be split into Used for Design Production of Complex Parts Manufacture of Lightweight Structural Parts for Automotives Customized Special Parts and Inspection Instruments Vehicle Model Production other By Regions, this report covers (we can add the regions/countries as you want) North America China Europe Southeast Asia Japan India Global 3D Printing for Automotives Market Professional Survey Report 2017 1 Industry Overview of 3D Printing for Automotives 1.1 Definition and Specifications of 3D Printing for Automotives 1.1.1 Definition of 3D Printing for Automotives 1.1.2 Specifications of 3D Printing for Automotives 1.2 Classification of 3D Printing for Automotives 1.2.1 Metal/Metal-Alloy 3D Printing Automotives 1.2.2 Polymer 3D Printing Automotives 1.2.3 Other 1.3 Applications of 3D Printing for Automotives 1.3.1 Used for Design 1.3.2 Production of Complex Parts 1.3.3 Manufacture of Lightweight Structural Parts for Automotives 1.3.4 Customized Special Parts and Inspection Instruments 1.3.5 Vehicle Model Production 1.3.6 other 1.4 Market Segment by Regions 1.4.1 North America 1.4.2 China 1.4.3 Europe 1.4.4 Southeast Asia 1.4.5 Japan 1.4.6 India 2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of 3D Printing for Automotives 2.1 Raw Material and Suppliers 2.2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of 3D Printing for Automotives 2.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of 3D Printing for Automotives 2.4 Industry Chain Structure of 3D Printing for Automotives 8 Major Manufacturers Analysis of 3D Printing for Automotives 8.1 3D Systems Corporation 8.1.1 Company Profile 8.1.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.1.2.1 Product A 8.1.2.2 Product B 8.1.3 3D Systems Corporation 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.1.4 3D Systems Corporation 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.2 Autodesk 8.2.1 Company Profile 8.2.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.2.2.1 Product A 8.2.2.2 Product B 8.2.3 Autodesk 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.2.4 Autodesk 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.3 Arcam 8.3.1 Company Profile 8.3.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.3.2.1 Product A 8.3.2.2 Product B 8.3.3 Arcam 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.3.4 Arcam 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.4 Stratasys 8.4.1 Company Profile 8.4.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.4.2.1 Product A 8.4.2.2 Product B 8.4.3 Stratasys 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.4.4 Stratasys 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.5 Voxeljet 8.5.1 Company Profile 8.5.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.5.2.1 Product A 8.5.2.2 Product B 8.5.3 Voxeljet 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.5.4 Voxeljet 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.6 Exone 8.6.1 Company Profile 8.6.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.6.2.1 Product A 8.6.2.2 Product B 8.6.3 Exone 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.6.4 Exone 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.7 Hoganas 8.7.1 Company Profile 8.7.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.7.2.1 Product A 8.7.2.2 Product B 8.7.3 Hoganas 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.7.4 Hoganas 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.8 Optomec 8.8.1 Company Profile 8.8.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.8.2.1 Product A 8.8.2.2 Product B 8.8.3 Optomec 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.8.4 Optomec 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.9 Local Motors 8.9.1 Company Profile 8.9.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.9.2.1 Product A 8.9.2.2 Product B 8.9.3 Local Motors 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.9.4 Local Motors 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.10 Ponoko 8.10.1 Company Profile 8.10.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.10.2.1 Product A 8.10.2.2 Product B 8.10.3 Ponoko 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.10.4 Ponoko 2016 3D Printing for Automotives Business Region Distribution Analysis For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/1205978-global-3d-printing-for-automotives-market-professional-survey-report-2017


News Article | December 23, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

On Friday, January 6 at CES 2017, The TCT Group will present an exciting one day program entitled, “ 3D Printing : Evaluating the Evolution”, which aims to explore the reality of how consumers will be affected by 3D printing in a wide range of sectors including health and fitness, apparel, design, transport and the Internet of Things. Now in its fourth year, the TCT Conference at CES goes from strength to strength with past delegates including Airbus, Amazon, BMW, DoD, Facebook, Hyundai, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Northrop Grumman, Phillips, PING, Tencent and Walmart. All of whom attend to get the very latest updates on the technology, hear about breakthrough applications, and get a steer on how 3D printing will impact our lives in the future. To complement our stellar line up we will have further insight from SAP, Worrell, Intel and the exciting open source manufacturer Local Motors which uses 3D printing extensively in its vehicle production. The day will conclude with the engaging Todd Grimm hosting a discussion panel with many of the days speakers contributing. It promises to deliver world class insight into what is possible today and what might be tomorrow. Registration for TCT@CES can be easily completed here. The 2017 edition of CES will also see the TCT Group continue its sponsorship of the 3D Printing Marketplace on the show floor. The expo, open to visitors January 5-8, will feature technology leaders showing the latest developments in desktop 3D printing machinery. Cutting edge technology from the likes of Formlabs, Aleph Objects, Markforged, Beijing Tiertime Technology and DWS SRL will demonstrate on the show floor that there is a real thirst for reliable desktop machinery to print parts from prototyping to production. See TCT Magazine on Booth 42510 in Sands Expo. Note to Editors: The official name of the global technology event is "CES®."  Please do not use "Consumer Electronics Show" or "International CES" to refer to the event. About TCT: Accelerating 3D Technologies. The TCT Group, part of Rapid News Publications Ltd., has a mission to accelerate the adoption of 3D technologies for design, development and manufacture globally across all industry sectors. With over 20 years’ experience in delivering comprehensive market leading events and media solutions the TCT Group remains a leading authority within the 3D technologies industry. Learn more at http://www.thetctgroup.com About CES:  CES is the world's gathering place for all who thrive on the business of consumer technologies. It has served as the proving ground for innovators and breakthrough technologies for 50 years-the global stage where next-generation innovations are introduced to the marketplace. As the largest hands-on event of its kind, CES features all aspects of the industry. Owned and produced by the Consumer Technology Association (CTA)TM, it attracts the world's business leaders and pioneering thinkers. Follow CES online at http://www.ces.tech


News Article | June 17, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

Find Out How 3D Printing Technology And 3D Printers Are Changing The World Electric. Driverless. 3D -printed. These features best describe a vehicle of the future — and all three are found in Olli, the new self-driving electric minibus designed by Local Motors and powered by IBM Watson. And did we mention Olli is (partially) recyclable too? If the concept behind its manufacturing is a little out of the ordinary, then that's because Local Motors is indeed hoping to reinvent the whole practice of building (and rebuilding) vehicles. For one, the manufacturer takes inspiration from crowdsourced vehicle designs and is set to offer some of the world's first 3D printed cars this year — a refreshing approach to car manufacturing. Olli's own design was submitted by Edgar Sarmiento, a student of car design who wanted to keep the bus "simple" and "minimalistic." "This one is a public solution for cities," Sarmiento tells The Verge. Just how innovative is Olli? The driverless bus' manufacturing process is, first of all, one of the most efficient in the auto industry. After 3D printing the vehicle parts at a "microfactory" for just 10 hours, builders can put together the final product within just another hour. At these microfactories, communities can open-source the powertrain. "The motor and the sensors and electronics [are] something we can partner very well with other people," shares John B. Rogers, Jr., Local Motors CEO and cofounder. Not only is the "hardware" easy to produce and assemble, but the "software" is also intelligent and user-friendly. It can understand natural human language, such as when a passenger asks about the destination. Olli's brain power is based on IBM Watson's Internet-of-Things platform for Automotive, making the minibus the first EV to feature the cloud-based computing capability. "Olli offers a smart, safe and sustainable transportation solution that is long overdue," Rogers says. Soon, when the operations of the minibus are in full swing, passengers will be able to summon one for a ride by using an app, similar to how people today hail Uber. The electric bus will be going around Washington D.C. on trial runs all summer long, but it will be hitting the road too in Miami and Las Vegas, as well as Berlin, Germany. The 12-seater EV was unveiled in National Harbor during the opening of Local Motors' new facility in Maryland, but more microfactories are also set to open. The event showcased innovative techniques in 3D printing and the recycling of 3D -printed cars. It also aimed to encourage children to take up an interest in engineering and the sciences. © 2016 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | November 4, 2015
Site: www.techtimes.com

Forget self-driving cars. Local Motors, a barely known name in the automotive industry, is shaking things up in the market with the world's first mass-produced 3D printed car, the LM 3D Swim. Instead of taking control away from customers in the driver's seat, Local Motors is putting them in the driver's seat of customizing their very own vehicles and delivering it to them at a pace never seen before. In fact, the Swim model of Local Motors' LM 3D class of cars went from a design concept in July to a full prototype by September just this year. Looking like a cross between a Mini Cooper and a dune buggy, the LM 3D Swim promises to be one-of-a-kind. Though the underpinnings of the car will remain the same throughout the series, Local Motors says customers will be able customize the aesthetic features of the Swim which is only made possible through 3D printing. In short, all Swims will be the same on the inside, but each will be unique on the outside. The existing prototype of the Swim is running on the same powertrain used in the BMW i3 and it's expected that the final production car will stick with it. Unlike the i3, the Swim will run solely off electricity as a gas tank and other corresponding parts would add too much complexity to the vehicles 3D printing processes. Nonetheless, it is the 3D -printed design of the Swim that makes the car more than just customized eye candy. The 3D printing production process allows the car to design in crumple and deformation zones, essentially allowing the whole frame to act much like an elaborate roll cage. Besides being safer for humans, the vehicle is also safer for the planet. 3D printing allows for less wastage, and the materials used in the printing process are even recyclable. Presales of the LM 3D Swim will begin in the spring of next year while it continues to undergo federal crash testing and highway certification during the same year. The first units are expected to roll off the production floor by early 2017 at Local Motors' production facilities in Knoxville, Tennessee where the company expects to be able to print out 2,400 Swims per year. Depending on the different customization options Local Motors offers for the LM 3D Swim, the world's next-generation 3D printed car will cost at least $53,000.


If you live in the Mid-Atlantic region, you should soon be able to buy a 3D -printed car -- or at least see one made. Developers at National Harbor -- a 350-acre waterfront property in Prince George's County, Maryland -- announced their plans earlier this month to open a facility for Local Motors by year's end. The facility, which is expected to be approximately 40,000 square feet, will include a 3D printing microfactory, lab, and showroom. Local Motors aims to change the way autos are made and sold The business model of Phoenix-based Local Motors, founded in 2007, involves crowdsourcing the designing of vehicles, and then building and selling them locally. Its ultimate goal is to open microfactories near all major urban centers. Manufacturing autos close to their ultimate buyers should cut down drastically on distribution costs. The company currently has locations in Phoenix and Las Vegas, but according to the Washington Post, the National Harbor site would be "the first Local Motors outpost to print, refine and assemble a fleet of cars via 3-D printer." "It's like an IKEA. People will come from all around to experience it," the Washington Post quoted Justin Fishkin, chief strategy officer for Local Motors, as saying. I think that might prove true. Surely, many 3D printing aficionados, as well as tech lovers and auto enthusiasts, will probably find something of interest to do and see at the facility, which promises to have a major demonstrative -- and perhaps even a participatory -- bent. Additionally, there reportedly will be hundreds of other 3D -printed items for sale. So, members of the general public who don't fall into the above-mentioned groups might also find something that appeals to them -- and their wallets. Autodesk: Local Motors' public-company partner OK, so this is cool, but where's the investing link? Software maker Autodesk (NASDAQ:ADSK) announced last fall that it's collaborating with Local Motors. Local Motors is using Autodesk's Spark, a new open platform for 3D printing, as it continues to work with privately held Cincinnati Inc. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the Strati, the world's first 3D printed full-size car. In September, the trio used the BAAM (big area additive manufacturing) machine that Cincinnati and ORNL are developing to produce the Strati electric vehicle live at the International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago. They repeated the feat earlier this month at the Detroit Auto Show. The Strati will initially be classified as a neighborhood electric vehicle, limited to driving on roads with posted speed limits of 45 miles per hour or less, according to Popular Science. However, PopSci also reports, "Local Motors is seeking approval from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for highway-capable vehicles." If the Autodesk-Local Motors team-up can demonstrate that the Spark platform increases the ease and efficiency of Local Motors' 3D printing efforts on its Strati project and beyond, Spark could accelerate the adoption of 3D printing for industrial applications. This in turn would likely benefit Autodesk, which makes computer-aided design, or CAD, software for 3D printing as well as for other applications. The bigger picture... a bigger 3D printing industry pie If Local Motors' efforts help light a fire under the adoption of 3D printing for industrial applications, the entire size of the 3D printing industry could grow faster than projected. And estimates are already robust: Industry analyst Wohlers Associates expects that the global 3D printing industry will grow from $3.07 billion in 2013 to more than $21 billion by 2020; that's greater than a 31% compounded average annual growth rate. In this scenario, manufacturers of 3D printers and companies that provide 3D printing services for industrial applications could benefit to varying degrees. These companies include  3D Systems (NYSE:DDD), Stratasys (NASDAQ:SSYS), ExOne, Arcam, voxeljet, and Materialise. (Materialise doesn't make 3D printers like the others; however, it does provide 3D printing services.) Granted, Cincinnati's BAAM machine could be looked upon as a competitive threat to the existing 3D printing players. However, for the near and intermediate terms, I think it's more likely than not that the introduction of BAAM to the scene will help the existing 3D printing companies more than it will hurt them. The target markets of Cincinnati Inc. and the existing players do not currently overlap, as Cincinnati is solely targeting large-scale 3D printing. Stratasys, in my opinion, could especially benefit from the increased use of 3D printing for both prototyping and short-run production applications in industrial settings. The 3D printing industry leader offers printers that can print in an impressive range of tough thermoplastics, well suited for various industrial applications. Unlike its main rival, 3D Systems, Stratasys currently doesn't sell systems that can print in metals, though I think it's just a matter of time until it does. Stratasys does, however, provide metal 3D printing services via its on-demand 3D printing services operation. I also think it's likely that Stratasys will eventually possess capabilities to print in carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics. Stratasys has been working with Oak Ridge National Lab since 2012 to develop FDM carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics. (FDM stands for "fused deposition modeling," one of Stratasys' three 3D printing technologies.) Successfully infusing reinforcing fibers into plastic feedstock is widely considered a major key to scaling up 3D printing to produce large parts for automobile, aerospace, and other applications where strong but lightweight materials are needed. And, in fact, the Stratis that are being produced by Cincinnati's BAAM machine are largely being made using reinforced plastic. Final thoughts The proposed opening of the first factory to use 3D printing to produce vehicles is surely a positive for the 3D printing industry as a whole. It's too soon, however, to predict how the success of such an endeavor will affect the fortunes of the existing players. But I'll continue to follow the Local Motors' story and keep 3D printing investors abreast of new developments.


News Article | September 15, 2014
Site: www.fool.com

Software maker Autodesk (NASDAQ:ADSK) announced today that it's collaborating with Local Motors, a leader in open-source 3D printing hardware innovation. Local Motors will be using Autodesk's Spark, a new open platform for 3D printing, as it continues to develop the Strati, the world's first 3D -printed full-size car. First, let's look at Autodesk's 3D printing initiative and its just-announced team-up, and then we'll explore the potential ramifications of the success of this partnership. Audodesk's 3D printing initiative and the Local Motors team-up Earlier this year, Autodesk announced plans to introduce Spark. Spark is aimed at making it simpler and more reliable to print 3D models and easier to control how those models are printed. Essentially, Spark acts as a bridge between the design and 3D printing of an object, as it translates digital design data from modeling software into a form that's required by a 3D printer. At the time of this announcement, Autodesk also said it would be launching a 3D printer, which will serve as a reference implementation for Spark (for those who don't already have their own hardware). The Spark platform can be used for the full range of 3D printing applications from consumer to industrial. Aubrey Cattell, Autodesk's Director of Business Development, told me via a phone interview that the company views the manufacturing space as having the most potential. So, it's no surprise that its first Spark team-up involves a large-scale, industrial project. The Strati project, which I've previously written about, is a fascinating and timely one. No doubt, the timeliness factor is why Audodesk released its announcement today. Just last week, the first Strati was 3D -printed live at the International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago. The body of the vehicle was printed in a carbon-fiber-reinforced ABS thermoplastic by the BAAM (big area additive manufacturing) machine, which was just developed by privately held Cincinnati and the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Lab. I brought Foolish readers news of this partnership last February. The BAAM machine is an ultra-fast, large-scale polymer 3D printer that reportedly is 200 to 500 times faster and capable of printing polymer components 10 times larger than commercially available printers. While the 3D printing of the Strati was successfully accomplished at the IMTS, there were some bumps in the road, as would be expected with any new technology. That's where Autodesk's Spark comes in. Spark will help connect automobile digital design data to the BAAM 3D printer in a streamlined way for easier visualization and optimization of 3D prints. "The Spark platform is set to accelerate manufacturing innovation," said Alex Fiechter, head of community management for Local Motors, in the press release. "From capturing our ideas more accurately to guiding Design for Additive Manufacturing (DFAM) and simplifying the creation of machine code, Spark will help us to turn digital models into actual physical production parts far faster [emphasis mine] than was previously possible." Spark's goal: Lighting a fire under the adoption of 3D printing Both Autodesk's Spark platform and the company's 3D printer design are open and freely available to hardware manufacturers, software developers, and others. This move marks the first time a major company has entered the 3D printing open source space. Why would Autodesk introduce such a platform? Simple. Autodesk makes computer-aided design (CAD) software for 3D printing, as well as other uses, so the company's potential market for its design software will increase as 3D printing becomes more prevalent. Thus, Autodesk has a big incentive to do what it can to make 3D printing as streamlined and user-friendly as possible. Autodesk isn't the only player in the 3D printing design software space, but it's one of the biggest. France-based Dassault Systemes is also a major force in this market. Fellow Fool Tim Beyers nicely summed up the company's strategy after Autodesk made its 3D printing plans public earlier this year: It's "reminiscent of how Google used the Nexus brand to accelerate development of third-party Android devices," he said. Tim says that he believed Autodesk's strategy was a smart one -- and I agree. Autodesk doesn't have much to lose and has everything to gain. After all, 3D printing is a huge growth space. According to Wohlers Report 2014, the global 3D printing industry is expected to grow from $3.07 billion in 2013 to more than $21 billion by 2020; that's greater than a 31% compounded annual growth rate. Furthermore, if Spark can speed up the adoption of 3D printing, then Wohlers' estimates could prove to be conservative. Beyond Autodesk, there are certainly other potential winners if Spark helps increase the rate at which industrial companies adopt or further embrace 3D printing: manufacturers of 3D printers and companies that provide 3D printing services for industrial applications. This includes, to varying degrees, 3D Systems, Stratasys, ExOne, Arcam, voxeljet, and Materialise. Materialise doesn't make 3D printers like the others; however, it does provide 3D printing services. Foolish final thoughts If the Autodesk-Local Motors team-up can demonstrate that the Spark platform increases the ease and efficiency of Local Motors' 3D printing efforts on its Strati project and beyond, Spark could accelerate the adoption of 3D printing for industrial applications. This would likely benefit some or all of the publicly traded 3D printer manufacturers and 3D printing service providers. It could also light a fire under Audodesk's 3D printing design software sales. As with the Strati, investors should stay tuned. We'll be keeping you updated as to the progress of this team-up as well as any new Spark partnership agreements that Autodesk inks.


News Article | March 4, 2015
Site: chiefexecutive.net

So far this year, Local Motors and its eye-popping 3D “printed” car have dazzled President Obama and Vice President Biden, sparked questions at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas and captured journalists’ imagination at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Now the question is: How quickly will the company’s planned new paradigm for customized manufacturing influence not only auto building but all sorts of other fabrication? Phoenix-based Local Motors staged a live 3D printing of The Strati, which it’s billing as the world’s first 3D printed car, at the Detroit auto show. The startup printed the polymer body of a working car prototype right on the show floor, including everything that could be integrated into a single material piece: chassis and frame, exterior body, and some interior features. The mechanical components of the vehicle, including battery, motors, wiring, and suspension, are sourced from Renault’s Twizy, an electric-powered city car. “We’ll be the first to tell you we won’t put economy of scale out of business. We’re profitable at the very first car. But we’re able to bring a vehicle to market at about 1/100th the cost and five times faster than [traditional manufacturers].” More than battery-operated two-seater cars, the company hopes to overturn existing paradigms with “distributed manufacturing” of highly customized products using additive or 3D printing at “microfactories” spread around America. The first, in Knoxville, Tennessee, comprises about 50,000 square feet on 10 acres of land, including test tracks for the cars built there. The microfactory is divided into four areas: a retail showroom where consumers can configure and order their own individualized automobiles (and eventually other products); a “Local Motors Lab” where non-employee inventors use the company’s tools and technology to work on aspects of Local Motors products in the hopes of landing a royalty on future output; an area where large-scale manufacturing occurs with the company’s heavy-duty printers and “routers” that smooth the products; and a warehousing area. Manufacturing CEO Briefing talked with Justin Fishkin, chief strategy officer of Local Motors, about 3D and the future of car manufacturing. MCEOB: Where did this idea come from? Justin Fishkin: The (Local Motors) company was founded by Jay Rogers, who was a Marine in Iraq when two of his buddies died, riding in Vietnam War-era equipment. He felt he could bring vehicle innovations to market more quickly. Opening up the hardware to crowdsourcing could help. He went to Harvard Business School after the Marines, wrote a business plan and some of his first investors were professors there. He decided to bring the global community together to source ideas, expertise and micromanufacturing. 3D printing is one tool that has developed to enable our business model in a much more dynamic way. We didn’t really have the idea for 3D printing of a car until last April. It wasn’t the original idea for the company; it’s something that just developed in our favor. MCEOB: How does your business model compare to the mass-production model that carmakers are still using? Fishkin: We’ll be the first to tell you we won’t put economy of scale out of business. But today, companies from Ford to Tesla are spending $1 billion or $2 billion or $5 billion on a factory or on just one model line and then having to amortize that cost over hundreds of thousands of units—or more—over time. It’s hugely capital-intensive, and it takes six to seven years to bring out a new model. We’re profitable at the very first car. We’re able to bring a vehicle to market at about 1/100th the cost and five times faster because we bring more people and expertise to the table. We won’t be able to build a million units; we call it an “economy of scope” instead of an economy of scale. For 3D printed cars, we are opening up microfactories in Knoxville and Washington, D.C. Where we’re headed is to be able to have people walk into our “store,” go up to a screen, choose one of nine or 10 unibodies, choose powertrains that we’ll buy from other manufacturers, choose wheels and tires and colors—and we’ll print it while you wait or you come back the next day. In a year, if you want to bring it back to upgrade the hardware, we’ll strip it down and melt it and give you credit to put toward your next vehicle. Or you can come back after just a month and swap in a new battery technology that comes out. It’s about integrating technology as quickly as it comes to market rather than waiting seven years. It’s an entirely different consumer experience. MCEOB: The importance of highly sophisticated elements of car production, such as engaging exterior and interior design, are obviously important to most car buyers, and automakers spend billions of dollars to get those things just right. Where are you going to get your designs from? Fishkin: Our community online is growing every day with more than 100,000 engineers and designers and enthusiasts and “makers” in about 130 countries. If you contribute to a vehicle we bring to market, you get paid a royalty on every unit we sell. It’s sort of like the music business; think of it a little bit like that. Not every vehicle or project that people are working on will come to market. But our community also is working on things from electric bikes to skateboards to satellites; we’re not just [an automaker] but a vehicle-technology company. MCEOB: Your first vehicle, The Strati, will cost between $18,000 and $30,000, about the price range for the mainstream conventional-vehicle market. So why should someone want one of your cars instead? Fishkin: Why would you want an iPhone? It’s the coolness factor. The recycling factor. Urban mobility. To be able to get the latest technology and upgrade it versus some out-of-date navigation system developed by an OEM will become the norm. People will walk in and have the experience of customizing a car and watching it made right in front of them. It’s experiential. And the price is competitive. Fishkin: We expect to put safe cars on the road in the next 12 months. We’re going through that process with regulators now. Interested in what 3D printing can do for your company? Join Chief Executive and speaker Rick Smith for a free webinar on The New Economics of 3D Printing March 26, 2015 (March 26, 2015 (2pm EST/3pm CST/4pm MST/5pm PST) In this complimentary, live event, you will learn how 3D printing can help you reduce production costs, improve product quality and increase speed to market. Webinar attendees will receive a complimentary whitepaper, Revolutionizing Manufacturing with 3D Printing : An Introduction.


News Article | May 11, 2015
Site: 3dprint.com

On January 23rd of this year, 3D Print.com officially launched. We were just a 2-man team back then — but fast forward 11 months and we now have 5 full time employees as well as a cast of highly respected freelance writers. Our fast growth may be surprising to some, but to those who understand just how rapidly the 3D printing industry is growing, it’s not a surprise at all. Over the last 11 months we have met an extraordinary number of incredible people working within the space. We’ve also covered some pretty amazing stories, which are sure to pale in comparison to what is in store for 2015. Below you will find our hand-picked list of the top 14 3D printing related stories of 2014. Enjoy! Made In Space and NASA 3D Print First Ever Object off of Planet Earth (More Details) It’s been a long time coming, and all throughout the year we followed California-based Made In Space as they worked closely with NASA on a 3D printer capable of printing in space. The printer was launched to the International Space Station in September, and by the end of November, the very first 3D printed object had been fabricated in space. Ironically the first functioning 3D print from the ISS was a part for the 3D printer itself, a faceplate for its printhead. Since November numerous other parts have been fabricated in space, and plans are in place to send a second, more sophisticated machine up sometime next year. Strati – First Ever 3D Printed Car, Fabricated and Assembled in Just 44 Hours (More Details) This was my favorite story, as the team at Local Motors set out to 3D print a car live at the International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago this September. The vehicle was printed and assembled in front of show goers, live, and took a total of just 44 hours to complete. Since September, Local Motors has increased their printing and assembly time, significantly, and we had the opportunity to speak with Jay Rogers, the company’s CEO. He told us that they have plans on rolling out dozens of microfactories over the coming years allowing people like you and me to walk in and order a 3D printed car and have it printed and delivered shortly thereafter. The company is also considering 3D printing other vehicles such as boats and planes, and just last month they announced that they would be giving away 12 3D printed cars to designers who would like to ‘hack’ the vehicle. Minnesota Man 3D Prints a Life Size Castle in His Back Yard (More Details) Whether you are one of those people who believe 3D printing will eventually take over all forms of production, even home building, or not, the 3D printed castle in Minnesota certainly had to pique your interest. We were the first to break this story back in July when Andrey Rudenko began constructing the home from a 3D concrete printer he had created himself. The castle was eventually completed in August, and since then Rudenko has made the actual 3D model available for download so you too can 3D print your own castle, even if it’s a tiny one. Although the castle was big enough to live in, the dimensions still made it a bit small to actually call it a home. Rudenko has plans to build an even bigger castle, all in one piece next. First 3D Printed Gun Arrest and Sentencing (More Details) Probably one of the more touchy subjects when it comes to 3D printing is the printing of guns and other weapons. Although there has yet to be a violent crime reported that we are aware of involving a 3D printed gun, there has been an arrest. Back in May Japanese authorities arrested 27-year-old Yoshitomo Imura who was employed at Shonan Institute of Technology in Japan. Imura was found to be in possession of five 3D printed guns, and also posted a video online of himself firing one the weapons. In October, Japanese courts handed down a significant punishment of two years in prison to the man. Sub-$300 3D Printers Are Here (More Info on MOD-t) (More Info on The Micro) 2014 has been the year of the affordable 3D printer. Two companies in particular, New Matter with their MOD-t 3D printer, and M 3D with the Micro 3D Printer, took the internet by storm. Both companies raked in huge sums of cash via crowdfunding, and shipments of both sub-$300 (many early backers paided under $200!) 3D printers will commence next year. Look for a wave of new 3D printing enthusiasts and newbies to emerge throughout the first half of the year thanks to these two companies. HP Enters the 3D Printing Space (More Details) After much anticipation throughout the year, HP officially announced their entrance into the 3D printing space with a new technology they call Multi Jet Fusion. Although they will not be shipping any printers until 2016, the company claims that their technology is leaps and bounds ahead of the competition. They stated that their forthcoming 3D printer will be capable of printing at speeds in excess of 10 times that of competitor’s machines. HP’s entrance is sure to cause quite the stir headed into 2015, as companies like Stratasys and 3D Systems may be forced to pad their R&D budgets a bit more in order to compete. In the end, competition will certainly lead to greater innovation and more affordable prices for all. It will be interesting to see how the major players within the industry react in 2015. The Mink Makeup 3D Printer Revealed (More Details) Back in May, Grace Choi revealed to the world the first ever Makeup 3D Printer she called Mink. The printer uses rather simple 2D printing technology in order to print out custom shades of lipstick, eye shadow, and even nail polish. Choi, who is a rather successful hardware hacker, plans to introduce the machine, which promises to disrupt the multi-billion dollar cosmetic industry, to the market sometime in 2015. It is expected to be priced south of $300. The 3D Printed Estate (House, Swimming Pool, & More!) (More Details) While 2014 certainly has been the year in which 3D printing technology expanded to encompass large objects such as cars and castles, one specfic project really caught our eye. New York architect Adam Kushner has been working on a project in which he will eventually 3D print an entire estate. The estate will consist of a 2,400-square-foot, 4 bedroom home (the roof will also be 3D printed), a swimming pool, and more. Kushner is working with Enrico Dini and James Wolff (yes, the same man who is trying to mine asteroids) on this project, which they expect to launch sometime next year. We were lucky enough to break this story earlier in the year after an extensive interview with Kushner. Vascularization Achieved – 3D Printed Organs, Here We Come? (More Details) One of the major obstacles in the way of functioning 3D printed organs is the complex vascular networks which feed the cells within any organ. Researchers have been able to print out cells from kidneys, the liver, and even the heart; however, the hard part has been the creation of vascular networks within these cells, which are required for long-term function. Researchers at the University of Sydney were able to 3D print tiny fibers which they then coated with human endothelial cells. Once coated they let the material harden and removed the printed fiber, leaving a hollow vascular network behind. The idea is to print organ cells around these networks, allowing for adequate blood flow to keep the printed tissue alive. Although we are not quite there yet, this research will likely play an integral part in the future of 3D printed organs. Autodesk Enters the 3D Printing Space (More Details) It has certainly been the year of the large corporation entering the 3D printing space. In addition to HP’s announcement that they would be entering the space in 2016, leading CAD software developer Autodesk announced in May that they too would not only be producing their own 3D printer called Ember, but also developing an entire 3D printer operating system called Spark. Spark has already been nicknamed by many within the industry “The Android OS of 3D Printers.” Autodesk does not seem terribly serious about selling printers themselves, and although they have recently announced their Ember SLA 3D printer, it appears that their main goal is to use this machine as an example to show the industry how well the Spark platform can be integrated into a specific printer. It will be interesting to see how quickly the platform is adopted over the next 12 months as companies such as Local Motors have already jumped on board in some capacity. Organovo Announces First Commercially Available 3D Printed Tissue, exVive 3D (More Details) With 3D printed human tissue being one of the biggest stories of the year, how could we leave out the company who has been leading the way within this field. After much anticipation, back in November Organovo officially released the world’s first commercially available 3D printed human tissue samples called exVive 3D . The tissue, which targets the pharmaceutical industry by providing 3D samples of the human liver for drug toxicity testing, could be a financial boon for the company. I also had an opportunity to speak with Organovo CEO Keith Murphy at the Inside 3D Printing Conference in Santa Clara back in October, where he explained the technology behind their printers. Murphy also announced that the company will be able to print partial human organs sometime within the next 4-6 years, with complete organs on the horizon soon after. Artist 3D Prints a Replica of Vincent van Gogh’s Ear Using His Family’s DNA (More Details) In probably one of the most bizarre, yet intriguing, stories we’ve covered this year, artist Diemut Strebe and a team of scientists set out to 3D print a replica of the famous painter’s ear that he chopped off. Not only was this a replica of the ear, but it was bioprinted with human cells created from the DNA of a relative, the painter’s great-grandson Lieuwe van Gogh. Back in July the ear was on display at the ZKM | Media Museum in Germany. 3D Printed Vagina Replica Lands Japanese Artist in Jail (More Details) In yet another rather bizarre story, Japanese artist Megumi Igarashi was arrested in July after having scanned her lady parts and then uploaded the 3D model of the scan to the cloud for the public to download. Igarashi also 3D printed several pieces of art featuring her vagina as the center of each piece. Included was a kayak, as well as war scenes in which her lady parts were used to represent a trench. Authorities released the artist following a public outcry, only to arrest her once again this month. Japan is known for their strict laws prohibiting the display and content distribution of female genitalia, while a man’s penis is not held to the same strict laws and standards. In fact, every year there is a penis festival in Japan where images and models of penises are commonly displayed. It will be interesting to see what ultimately becomes of this case. Man Compares $42k Prosthetic Hand to a $50 3D Printed Version (More Details) Probably our most read article of the year was one in which a man named Jose Delgado Jr., who was born without a left hand, compared a prosthetic hand he had been using, which cost him $42,000, to that of a $50 3D printed prosthesis. The comparison was quite interesting, as he generally preferred the 3D printed version to the one which cost 840 times the amount. Since April when the story first aired, hundreds of individuals have been fitted with their own personal 3D printed prostheses, and numerous initiatives are under way to develop even more advanced 3D printed hands for individuals who can not afford the excessive prices that traditional prostheses go for. There you have it, the rundown of the top 3D printing stories we’ve covered in 2014.  We can’t wait to see what makes the list next year! Let us know your favorite in the 2014 Year in Review forum thread on 3D PB.com.


News Article | December 27, 2016
Site: www.cnet.com

I guess we shouldn't be too surprised anymore at what can be done with 3D-printing machines. After all, companies like Local Motors are constructing whole cars using the technology, but it's still always interesting to see what people are coming up. For example, it's hard not to notice when someone builds a working 3D-printed model of a LS3 V8 engine from a Chevrolet Camaro. The video below shows the model being assembled like a real engine, and "running" on an engine stand. With the exception of the bearings and fasteners, all parts were 3D-printed. Parts for the undeniably cool piece were modeled from CAD files found on the internet, as well as pictures and diagrams from repair manuals.


News Article | October 11, 2016
Site: www.gizmag.com

Where 3D printing vehicles is concerned, Local Motors takes much of the headline chatter, but that's not to say others aren't dabbling with the technology. Last week, Honda and Kabuku unveiled a custom-designed electric vehicle for making deliveries, the body panels of which have been 3D -printed. The Micro Commuter was created for confectionery firm Toshimaya, which needed a vehicle it could use for shortbread deliveries around its hometown of Kamakura in Japan and on which advertisements could be displayed. It was also necessary that the vehicle be able to negotiate Kamakura's narrows roads. Working with digital fabrication outfit Kabuku, Honda developed the delivery vehicle over the course of about two months. It is based on the Micro Commuter Concept, which was first shown off in 2011, and employs Honda's Variable Design Platform. This sees key components – like the battery, motor and control unit – positioned together so that they can be easily used as the basis for other vehicles. The chassis, meanwhile, is constructed from a rigid lightweight pipe frame structure. Where the Micro Commuter delivery vehicle differs from its forbears is the provision of space in the rear for transporting produce. This is in place of the two rear seats and means that the only seat in the vehicle is for the centrally-positioned driver. Overall, the vehicle measures 2,495 x 1,280 x 1,545 mm (98 x and 50 x 61 in) weighs just 600 kg (1,323 lb). The vehicle also makes use of Kabuku's "Rinkak Mass Customization Solutions," which provide rapid 3D design, mold-less 3D printing and a network of factories for fabrication. The 3D printing is used to produce the vehicle's exterior panels, making it relatively quick and straightforward to customize them as required. Under the hood is an 11-kW (15 hp) electric motor that gives the Micro Commuter a top speed of 70 km/h (43 mph) and a range of around 80 km (50 mi). According to Honda, the battery can be charged in under 3 hours at AC 200 V or under 7 hours at AC 100 V. The Micro Commuter delivery vehicle was demonstrated last week at the Combined Exhibition of Advanced Technologies (CEATEC) IT and electronics trade show in Japan.

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