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Créteil, France

Vnuk D.,University of Zagreb | Lemo N.,University of Zagreb | Lemo N.,National Veterinary School of Alfort | Nesek-Adam V.,Sveti Duh General Hospital | And 6 more authors.
Collegium Antropologicum | Year: 2010

The spleen is an important organ for hemodynamic compensation during hemorrhagic shock. The aim of the study was to compare the hemodynamic and metabolic responses of sham-operated pigs with intact spleen, splenectomized pigs, and splenic autotransplanted pigs during hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by 30% total blood volume bleed in sham-operated, splenectomized and splenic autotransplanted pigs (n=20). Cardiopulmonary and metabolic variables were measured before, immediately after, and at 20, 60 and 100 minutes after hemorrhage. Upon hemor- rhagic shock induction, body temperature, mean arterial pressure, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, cardiac output, cardiac index and oxygen delivery decreased, while lactate and shock index increased. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were significantly lower in the splenectomized and splenic autotransplant groups as compared with the control group at 60 and 100 minutes after hemorrhage (p<0.05). Unlike intact spleen, splenic autotransplant could not improve hemody- namic parameters in hemorrhagic shock in pigs. In comparison to mice, rats or dogs, this species could be an interesting investigation model to test new surgical procedures during splenic related hemorrhagic shock, with potential applications in human medicine. Source


Braccini F.,Institute Azureen Dorl Et Of Chirurgie Of La Face | Dohan Ehrenfest D.M.,Gothenburg University | Dohan Ehrenfest D.M.,LoB5 Foundation for Research
Revue de Laryngologie Otologie Rhinologie | Year: 2010

Non surgical cosmetic medicine procedures for the face are developing considerably, as they deliver good results using simple, non invasive, atraumatic and reproducible techniques. Aesthetic mesotherapy, also known as anti-aging mesotherapy, uses intra-dermal injections of a nutritive and moisturizing solution to improve brightness, skin hydration and tonus, and also smooth out superficial wrinkles. Subcutaneous filler injections enable to fill wrinkles and folds; by using high density products it is also able to provide genuine facial volumetric reconstruction. Finally, botulinum toxin acts by reducing certain muscle contractions to smooth out expression lines and folds induced by facial dynamics. In this article, we explore the concept of combined therapy and describe our experience associating anti-aging mesotherapy (NCTF-135HA, Filorga, Paris, France), hyaluronic acid based fillers (X-HA3 and X-HA-Volume, Filorga, Paris, France) and botulinum toxin (Vistabel, Allergan, Irvine CA, USA). A therapy combining antiaging mesotherapy, botulinum toxin and filler injections, offers full treatment of the 3 biological levels of the covering tissues. This non-invasive therapeutic strategy brings patient satisfaction through a global approach to facial aging. Source


Simonpieri A.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Del Corso M.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Del Corso M.,University of Naples Federico II | Vervelle A.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | And 6 more authors.
Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology | Year: 2012

Platelet concentrates for surgical use are innovative tools of regenerative medicine, and were widely tested in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Unfortunately, the literature on the topic is contradictory and the published data are difficult to sort and interpret. In bone graft, implant and reconstructive surgery, the literature is particularly dense about the use of the various forms of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) - Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma (P-PRP) or Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Plasma (L-PRP) - but still limited about Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF) subfamilies. In this second article, we describe and discuss the current published knowledge about the use of PRP and PRF during implant placement (particularly as surface treatment for the stimulation of osseointegration), the treatment of peri-implant bone defects (after peri-implantitis, during implantation in an insufficient bone volume or during immediate post-extraction or post-avulsion implantation), the sinuslift procedures and various complex implant-supported treatments. Other potential applications of the platelet concentrates are also highlighted in maxillofacial reconstructive surgery, for the treatment of patients using bisphosphonates, anticoagulants or with post-tumoral irradiated maxilla. Finally, we particularly insist on the perspectives in this field, through the description and illustration of the use of L-PRF (Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin) clots and membranes during the regeneration of peri-implant bone defects, during the sinus-lift procedure and during complex implant-supported rehabilitations. The use of L-PRF allowed to define a new therapeutic concept called the Natural Bone Regeneration (NBR) for the reconstruction of the alveolar ridges at the gingival and bone levels. As it is illustrated in this article, the NBR principles allow to push away some technical limits of global implant-supported rehabilitations, particularly when combined with other powerful biotechnological tools: metronidazole solution, adequate bone substitutes and improved implant designs and surfaces (for example here AstraTech Osseospeed or Intra-Lock Ossean implants). As a general conclusion, we are currently living a transition period in the use of PRP and PRF in oral and maxillofacial surgery. PRPs failed to prove strong strategic advantages that could justify their use in daily practice, and the use of most PRP techniques will probably be limited to some very specific applications where satisfactory results have been reached. Only a few simple, inexpensive and efficient techniques such as the L-PRF will continue to develop in oral and maxillofacial surgery in the next years. This natural evolution illustrates that clinical sciences need concrete and practical solutions, and not hypothetical benefits. The history of platelet concentrates in oral and maxillofacial surgery finally demonstrates also how the techniques evolve and sometimes promote the definition of new therapeutical concepts and clinical protocols in the today's era of regenerative medicine. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. Source


Del Corso M.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Del Corso M.,University of Naples Federico II | Vervelle A.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Simonpieri A.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | And 6 more authors.
Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology | Year: 2012

Platelet concentrates for surgical use are innovative tools of regenerative medicine, and were widely tested in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Unfortunately, the literature on the topic is contradictory and the published data are difficult to sort and interpret. In periodontology and dentoalveolar surgery, the literature is particularly dense about the use of the various forms of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) - Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma (P-PRP) or Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Plasma (L-PRP) - but still limited about Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF) subfamilies. In this first article, we describe and discuss the current published knowledge about the use of PRP and PRF during tooth avulsion or extraction, mucogingival surgery, Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR) or bone filling of periodontal intrabony defects, and regeneration of alveolar ridges using Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR), in a comprehensive way and in order to avoid the traps of a confusing literature and to highlight the underlying universal mechanisms of these products. Finally, we particularly insist on the perspectives in this field, through the description and illustration of the systematic use of L-PRF (Leukocyte- and Platelet- Rich Fibrin) clots and membranes during tooth avulsion, cyst exeresis or the treatment of gingival recessions by root coverage. The use of L-PRF also allowed to define new therapeutic principles: NTR (Natural Tissue Regeneration) for the treatment of periodontal intrabony lesions and Natural Bone Regeneration (NBR) for the reconstruction of the alveolar ridges. In periodontology, this field of research will soon find his golden age by the development of user-friendly platelet concentrate procedures, and the definition of new efficient concepts and clinical protocols. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. Source


Vervelle A.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Mouhyi J.,Gothenburg University | Mouhyi J.,University of Southern California | Del Corso M.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | And 4 more authors.
Revue de Stomatologie et de Chirurgie Maxillo-Faciale | Year: 2010

Mouthwash solutions are mainly used for their antiseptic properties. They currently include synthetic agents (chlorhexidine, triclosan, etc.) or essential oils (especially Listerine). Many natural extracts may also be used. These associate both antiseptic effects and direct action on host response, due to their antioxidant, immunoregulatory, analgesic, buffering, or healing properties. The best known are avocado oil, manuka oil, propolis oil, grapefruit seed extract, pycnogenol, aloe vera, Q10 coenzyme, green tea, and megamin. The development of new technologies, such as microencapsulation (GingiNat ® concept), may allow an in situ slow release of active ingredients during several hours, and open new perspectives for mouthwash solutions. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved. Source

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