LoB5 Foundation for Research

Paris, France

LoB5 Foundation for Research

Paris, France

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Dohan Ehrenfest D.M.,Chonnam National University | Dohan Ehrenfest D.M.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Bielecki T.,University of Silesia | Jimbo R.,Gothenburg University | And 6 more authors.
Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology | Year: 2012

Platelet concentrates for surgical use are tools of regenerative medicine designed for the local release of platelet growth factors into a surgical or wounded site, in order to stimulate tissue healing or regeneration. Leukocyte content and fibrin architecture are 2 key characteristics of all platelet concentrates and allow to classify these technologies in 4 families, but very little is known about the impact of these 2 parameters on the intrinsic biology of these products. In this demonstration, we highlight some outstanding differences in the growth factor and matrix protein release between 2 families of platelet concentrate: Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma (P-PRP, here the Anitua's PRGF - Preparation Rich in Growth Factors - technique) and Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (L-PRF, here the Choukroun's method). These 2 families are the extreme opposites in terms of fibrin architecture and leukocyte content. The slow release of 3 key growth factors (Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGFβ1), Platelet-Derived Growth Factor AB (PDGF-AB) and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)) and matrix proteins (fibronectin, vitronectin and thrombospondin-1) from the L-PRF and P-PRP gel membranes in culture medium is described and discussed. During 7 days, the L-PRF membranes slowly release significantly larger amounts of all these molecules than the P-PRP gel membranes, and the 2 products display different release patterns. In both platelet concentrates, vitronectin is the sole molecule to be released almost completely after only 4 hours, suggesting that this molecule is not trapped in the fibrin matrix and not produced by the leukocytes. Moreover the P-PRP gel membranes completely dissolve in the culture medium after less than 5 days only, while the L-PRF membranes are still intact after 7 days. This simple demonstration shows that the polymerization and final architecture of the fibrin matrix considerably influence the strength and the growth factor trapping/release potential of the membrane. It also suggests that the leukocyte populations have a strong influence on the release of some growth factors, particularly TGFβ1. Finally, the various platelet concentrates present very different biological characteristics, and an accurate definition and characterization of the different families of product is a key issue for a better understanding and comparison of the reported clinical effects of these surgical adjuvants. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers.


Simonpieri A.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Del Corso M.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Del Corso M.,University of Naples Federico II | Vervelle A.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | And 6 more authors.
Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology | Year: 2012

Platelet concentrates for surgical use are innovative tools of regenerative medicine, and were widely tested in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Unfortunately, the literature on the topic is contradictory and the published data are difficult to sort and interpret. In bone graft, implant and reconstructive surgery, the literature is particularly dense about the use of the various forms of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) - Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma (P-PRP) or Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Plasma (L-PRP) - but still limited about Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF) subfamilies. In this second article, we describe and discuss the current published knowledge about the use of PRP and PRF during implant placement (particularly as surface treatment for the stimulation of osseointegration), the treatment of peri-implant bone defects (after peri-implantitis, during implantation in an insufficient bone volume or during immediate post-extraction or post-avulsion implantation), the sinuslift procedures and various complex implant-supported treatments. Other potential applications of the platelet concentrates are also highlighted in maxillofacial reconstructive surgery, for the treatment of patients using bisphosphonates, anticoagulants or with post-tumoral irradiated maxilla. Finally, we particularly insist on the perspectives in this field, through the description and illustration of the use of L-PRF (Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin) clots and membranes during the regeneration of peri-implant bone defects, during the sinus-lift procedure and during complex implant-supported rehabilitations. The use of L-PRF allowed to define a new therapeutic concept called the Natural Bone Regeneration (NBR) for the reconstruction of the alveolar ridges at the gingival and bone levels. As it is illustrated in this article, the NBR principles allow to push away some technical limits of global implant-supported rehabilitations, particularly when combined with other powerful biotechnological tools: metronidazole solution, adequate bone substitutes and improved implant designs and surfaces (for example here AstraTech Osseospeed or Intra-Lock Ossean implants). As a general conclusion, we are currently living a transition period in the use of PRP and PRF in oral and maxillofacial surgery. PRPs failed to prove strong strategic advantages that could justify their use in daily practice, and the use of most PRP techniques will probably be limited to some very specific applications where satisfactory results have been reached. Only a few simple, inexpensive and efficient techniques such as the L-PRF will continue to develop in oral and maxillofacial surgery in the next years. This natural evolution illustrates that clinical sciences need concrete and practical solutions, and not hypothetical benefits. The history of platelet concentrates in oral and maxillofacial surgery finally demonstrates also how the techniques evolve and sometimes promote the definition of new therapeutical concepts and clinical protocols in the today's era of regenerative medicine. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers.


Del Corso M.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Del Corso M.,University of Naples Federico II | Vervelle A.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Simonpieri A.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | And 6 more authors.
Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology | Year: 2012

Platelet concentrates for surgical use are innovative tools of regenerative medicine, and were widely tested in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Unfortunately, the literature on the topic is contradictory and the published data are difficult to sort and interpret. In periodontology and dentoalveolar surgery, the literature is particularly dense about the use of the various forms of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) - Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma (P-PRP) or Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Plasma (L-PRP) - but still limited about Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF) subfamilies. In this first article, we describe and discuss the current published knowledge about the use of PRP and PRF during tooth avulsion or extraction, mucogingival surgery, Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR) or bone filling of periodontal intrabony defects, and regeneration of alveolar ridges using Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR), in a comprehensive way and in order to avoid the traps of a confusing literature and to highlight the underlying universal mechanisms of these products. Finally, we particularly insist on the perspectives in this field, through the description and illustration of the systematic use of L-PRF (Leukocyte- and Platelet- Rich Fibrin) clots and membranes during tooth avulsion, cyst exeresis or the treatment of gingival recessions by root coverage. The use of L-PRF also allowed to define new therapeutic principles: NTR (Natural Tissue Regeneration) for the treatment of periodontal intrabony lesions and Natural Bone Regeneration (NBR) for the reconstruction of the alveolar ridges. In periodontology, this field of research will soon find his golden age by the development of user-friendly platelet concentrate procedures, and the definition of new efficient concepts and clinical protocols. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers.


Mouhyi J.,Gothenburg University | Mouhyi J.,University of Southern California | Del Corso M.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Hippolyte M.-P.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | And 4 more authors.
Revue de Stomatologie et de Chirurgie Maxillo-Faciale | Year: 2010

Introduction: New mouthwash solutions containing microencapsulated natural extracts were developed to provide both antiseptic activity and in depth treatment of oral tissues, due to their antioxidant and immunoregulatory properties. The objective of this study was to quantify the antioxidant action of the GingiNat solution (LoB5 Foundation, Paris, France) in an in vitro cell model. Materials and methods: Diluted GingNat solutions (0.12%, 0.06% and 0.012%) were put in contact with Jurkat type human lymphoid cells in basal radical state (cells at rest) and in provoked oxidative stress conditions (after an UVA + UVB irradiation). The lipid peroxidation was quantified by flow cytometry using a fluorescent probe. Results: The diluted GingNat solutions at 0.12%, 0.06%, and 0.012% showed a significant antioxidant effect with respectively 122.9%, 117.8% and 119.3% on average. The difference was statistically significant compared to controls for the three concentrations without any significant difference among them. This antioxidant effect was even more significant when cells were in oxidative stress with respectively 155.3%, 139.3%, and 132.5% on average. There was a significant difference between the tested concentrations (p < 0.01). Discussion: These first in vitro results confirmed the antioxidant properties of the GingiNat solution. These antioxidant properties are significantly higher at stronger concentrations. Further studies are required to analyze the influence of microencapsulation on these results. Clinical trials are needed to confirm these antioxidant properties. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.


Mouhyi J.,Gothenburg University | Mouhyi J.,University of Southern California | Del Corso M.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Hippolyte M.-P.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | And 2 more authors.
Revue de Stomatologie et de Chirurgie Maxillo-Faciale | Year: 2010

Introduction: New mouthwash solutions containing microencapsulated natural extracts have been developed. Besides antiseptic activity, these solutions have antioxidant and immunoregulatory properties on oral tissues. The objective of this preliminary clinical study was to assess the efficiency of a mouthwash containing microencapsulated natural extracts (GingiNat, LoB5 Foundation, Paris, France) on gingivitis. Patients and methods: Twenty volunteers (37 ± 2 years) with significant gingivitis (bleeding when tooth-brushing) used a 6% GingiNat® mouthwash solution, two to three times per day (according to oral hygiene habits) for 21 days in addition to their usual oral care. Each volunteer was examined at day 0, 4, 7 and 21. The Löe and Silness Plaque Index, the Russel Periodontal Index, a breath index (halitosis), and oral tissue tolerance were assessed. Finally, each volunteer filled in a daily follow-up form and answered a questionnaire on tolerance and acceptability. Results: A significant decrease of the dental plaque index was observed on day 4, 7, and 21, in respectively 29, 48 and 71% of volunteers. This decrease reached 18% on day 4 (p = 0.014), 32% on day 7 (p = 0.002), and 47% on day 21 (p < 0.001). A significant decrease of the periodental index was observed on day 4, 7 and 21, in respectively 52, 81 and 95% of volunteers. This decrease reached 30% (p = 0.001) on day 4, 49% (p < 0.001) on day 7, and 78% (p < 0.001) on day 21. A significant improvement of the breath index was noted on day 4, 7, and 21, in respectively 43, 52 and 48% of volunteers. This improvement reached 29% (p = 0.004) on day 4, 35% (p = 0.001) on day 7, and 32% (p = 0.002) on day 21. The mouthwash was well tolerated. The patients liked its effectiveness and organoleptic properties. All patients expressed the wish to continue using this solution. Discussion: The GingiNat® mouthwash solution at 6% had a significant efficiency on plaque, gingivitis, and halitosis after 21 days of use. This makes it a good complementary treatment for gingivitis. Tolerance and acceptability were good despite the long and repeated use. Further studies are needed to have a detailed analysis of its efficiency in the long run and on patients presenting with various forms of periodontitis. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.


Vervelle A.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | Mouhyi J.,Gothenburg University | Mouhyi J.,University of Southern California | Del Corso M.,LoB5 Foundation for Research | And 4 more authors.
Revue de Stomatologie et de Chirurgie Maxillo-Faciale | Year: 2010

Mouthwash solutions are mainly used for their antiseptic properties. They currently include synthetic agents (chlorhexidine, triclosan, etc.) or essential oils (especially Listerine). Many natural extracts may also be used. These associate both antiseptic effects and direct action on host response, due to their antioxidant, immunoregulatory, analgesic, buffering, or healing properties. The best known are avocado oil, manuka oil, propolis oil, grapefruit seed extract, pycnogenol, aloe vera, Q10 coenzyme, green tea, and megamin. The development of new technologies, such as microencapsulation (GingiNat ® concept), may allow an in situ slow release of active ingredients during several hours, and open new perspectives for mouthwash solutions. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.


Braccini F.,Institute Azureen Dorl Et Of Chirurgie Of La Face | Dohan Ehrenfest D.M.,Gothenburg University | Dohan Ehrenfest D.M.,LoB5 Foundation for Research
Revue de Laryngologie Otologie Rhinologie | Year: 2010

Non surgical cosmetic medicine procedures for the face are developing considerably, as they deliver good results using simple, non invasive, atraumatic and reproducible techniques. Aesthetic mesotherapy, also known as anti-aging mesotherapy, uses intra-dermal injections of a nutritive and moisturizing solution to improve brightness, skin hydration and tonus, and also smooth out superficial wrinkles. Subcutaneous filler injections enable to fill wrinkles and folds; by using high density products it is also able to provide genuine facial volumetric reconstruction. Finally, botulinum toxin acts by reducing certain muscle contractions to smooth out expression lines and folds induced by facial dynamics. In this article, we explore the concept of combined therapy and describe our experience associating anti-aging mesotherapy (NCTF-135HA, Filorga, Paris, France), hyaluronic acid based fillers (X-HA3 and X-HA-Volume, Filorga, Paris, France) and botulinum toxin (Vistabel, Allergan, Irvine CA, USA). A therapy combining antiaging mesotherapy, botulinum toxin and filler injections, offers full treatment of the 3 biological levels of the covering tissues. This non-invasive therapeutic strategy brings patient satisfaction through a global approach to facial aging.

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