LLC Panagen

Gorno-Altaysk, Russia

LLC Panagen

Gorno-Altaysk, Russia
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Dolgova E.V.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | Proskurina A.S.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | Nikolin V.P.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | Popova N.A.,Novosibirsk State University | And 11 more authors.
Gene | Year: 2012

Morbidity and mortality in mice were observed upon administration of exogenous DNA following their pre-treatment with a cytostatic agent cyclophosphamide. Upon intraperitoneal injections, the fragments of exogenous DNA reached bone marrow cells. These cells were also found to internalize up to 1800. kb of exogenous DNA ex vivo. The 18-24. h time frame represents a final stage in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, so when exogenous DNA was administered within this critical period of time, pathological changes were observed in many target organs. Namely, bone marrow cells underwent a sustained increase in apoptosis. Copy number of B1 and B2 DNA repeats in bone marrow cells remained unchanged, whereas in the control group of animals their levels were significantly decreased. Finally, the bone marrow cells of moribund animals completely lacked lymphoid progenitors, yet the CD34. + hematopoietic stem cell counts were normal. Histopathology analysis suggested that mice died due to accidental involution of lymphoid organs combined with a systemic inflammatory process induced by massive administration of exogenous DNA and depletion of lymphoid lineage. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Dolgova E.V.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | Alyamkina E.A.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | Efremov Y.R.,Novosibirsk State University | Nikolin V.P.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | And 18 more authors.
Cancer Biology and Therapy | Year: 2014

It has been established previously that up to 40% of mouse CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are capable of internalizing exogenous dsDNA fragments both in vivo and ex vivo. Importantly, when mice are treated with a combination of cyclophosphamide and dsDNA, the repair of interstrand crosslinks in hematopoietic progenitors is attenuated, and their pluripotency is altered. Here we show for the first time that among various actively proliferating mammalian cell populations there are subpopulations capable of internalizing dsDNA fragments. In the context of cancer, such dsDNA-internalizing cell subpopulations display cancer stem cell-like phenotype. Furthermore, using Krebs-2 ascites cells as a model, we found that upon combined treatment with cyclophosphamide and dsDNA, engrafted material loses its tumor-initiating properties which we attribute to the elimination of tumor-initiating stem cell subpopulation or loss of its tumorigenic potential. © 2014 Landes Bioscience.


Potter E.A.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | Dolgova E.V.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | Proskurina A.S.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | Minkevich A.M.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | And 9 more authors.
Oncotarget | Year: 2016

We describe the strategy, which allows curing experimental mice engrafted with Krebs-2 ascites. The strategy is based on the facts that i) Krebs-2 tumor-initiating stem cells (TISCs) are naturally capable of internalizing fragments of extracellular double-stranded DNA (dsDNA); ii) upon delivery into TISCs, these dsDNA fragments interfere with the on-going DNA repair process so that TISCs either die or lose their tumorigenic potential. The following 3-step regimen of therapeutic procedures leading to eradication of Krebs-2 ascites is considered. Firstly, three timed injections of cyclophosphamide (CP) exactly matching the interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair phases that lead to synchronization of ascites cells in late S/G2/M. Secondly, additional treatment of ascites 18 hours post each CP injection (at NER/HR transition timepoint) with a composite dsDNA-based preparation interfering with the NER and HR repair pathways, so that tumorigenic properties of ascites cells are compromised. Thirdly, final treatment of mice with a combination of CP and dsDNA injections as ascites cells undergo apoptotic destruction, and the surviving TAMRA+ TISCs arrested in late S/G2/M phases massively enter into G1/S, when they regain sensitivity to CP+dsDNA treatment. Thus, this regimen assures that no viable cells, particularly Krebs-2 TISCs, remain.


PubMed | Novosibirsk State Medical Academy, RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk State University, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences and LLC Panagen
Type: | Journal: Cancer cell international | Year: 2015

Extracellular double-stranded DNA participates in various processes in an organism. Here we report the suppressive effects of fragmented human double-stranded DNA along or in combination with cyclophosphamide on solid and ascites grafts of mouse Krebs-2 tumor cells and DNA preparation on human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7.Apoptosis and necrosis were assayed by electrophoretic analysis (DNA nucleosomal fragmentation) and by measurements of LDH levels in ascitic fluid, respectively. DNA internalization into MCF-7 was analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy.Direct cytotoxic activity of double-stranded DNA (along or in combination with cyclophosphamide) on a solid transplant was demonstrated. This resulted in delayed solid tumor proliferation and partial tumor lysis due to necrosis of the tumor and adjacent tissues. In the case of ascites form of tumor, extensive apoptosis and secondary necrosis were observed. Similarly, MCF-7 cells showed induction of massive apoptosis (up to 45%) as a result of treatments with double-stranded DNA preparation.Double-stranded DNA (along or in combination with cyclophosphamide) induces massive apoptosis of Krebs-2 ascite cells and MCF-7 cell line (DNA only). In treated mice it reduces the integrity of gut wall cells and contributes to the development of systemic inflammatory reaction.


PubMed | LLC Panagen, RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics and Russian Academy of Medical Sciences
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Oncotarget | Year: 2016

We describe the strategy, which allows curing experimental mice engrafted with Krebs-2 ascites. The strategy is based on the facts that i) Krebs-2 tumor-initiating stem cells (TISCs) are naturally capable of internalizing fragments of extracellular double-stranded DNA (dsDNA); ii) upon delivery into TISCs, these dsDNA fragments interfere with the on-going DNA repair process so that TISCs either die or lose their tumorigenic potential. The following 3-step regimen of therapeutic procedures leading to eradication of Krebs-2 ascites is considered. Firstly, three timed injections of cyclophosphamide (CP) exactly matching the interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair phases that lead to synchronization of ascites cells in late S/G2/M. Secondly, additional treatment of ascites 18 hours post each CP injection (at NER/HR transition timepoint) with a composite dsDNA-based preparation interfering with the NER and HR repair pathways, so that tumorigenic properties of ascites cells are compromised. Thirdly, final treatment of mice with a combination of CP and dsDNA injections as ascites cells undergo apoptotic destruction, and the surviving TAMRA+ TISCs arrested in late S/G2/M phases massively enter into G1/S, when they regain sensitivity to CP+dsDNA treatment. Thus, this regimen assures that no viable cells, particularly Krebs-2 TISCs, remain.


Proskurina A.S.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | Gvozdeva T.S.,Novosibirsk State Medical University | Alyamkina E.A.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | Dolgova E.V.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | And 16 more authors.
BMC Cancer | Year: 2015

Background: We performed a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II clinical trial of human dsDNA-based preparation Panagen in a tablet form. In total, 80 female patients with stage II-IV breast cancer were recruited. Methods: Patients received three consecutive FAC (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) or AC (doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) adjuvant chemotherapies (3 weeks per course) and 6 tablets of 5 mg Panagen or placebo daily (one tablet every 2-3 hours, 30 mg/day) for 18 days during each chemotherapy course. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistica 6.0 software, and non-parametric analyses, namely Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney and paired Wilcoxon tests. To describe the results, the following parameters were used: number of observations (n), median, interquartile range, and minimum-maximum range. Results: Panagen displayed pronounced leukostimulatory and leukoprotective effects when combined with chemotherapy. In an ancillary protocol, anticancer effects of a tablet form of Panagen were analyzed. We show that Panagen helps maintain the pre-therapeutic activity level of innate antitumor immunity and induces formation of a peripheral pool of cytotoxic CD8+ perforin + T-cells. Our 3-year follow-up analysis demonstrates that 24% of patients who received Panagen relapsed or died after the therapy, as compared to 45% in the placebo cohort. Conclusions: The data collected in this trial set Panagen as a multi-faceted "all-in-one" medicine that is capable of simultaneously sustaining hematopoiesis, sparing the innate immune cells from adverse effects of three consecutive rounds of chemotherapy and boosting individual adaptive immunity. Its unique feature is that it is delivered via gastrointestinal tract and acts through the lymphoid system of intestinal mucosa. Taken together, maintenance of the initial levels of innate immunity, development of adaptive cytotoxic immune response and significantly reduced incidence of relapses 3 years after the therapy argue for the anticancer activity of Panagen. © 2015 Proskurina et al.; licensee BioMed Central.


PubMed | RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics, LLC Panagen, Irkutsk State Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences and 3 more.
Type: | Journal: BMC cancer | Year: 2015

We performed a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II clinical trial of human dsDNA-based preparation Panagen in a tablet form. In total, 80 female patients with stage II-IV breast cancer were recruited.Patients received three consecutive FAC (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) or AC (doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) adjuvant chemotherapies (3 weeks per course) and 6 tablets of 5 mg Panagen or placebo daily (one tablet every 2-3 hours, 30 mg/day) for 18 days during each chemotherapy course. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistica 6.0 software, and non-parametric analyses, namely Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney and paired Wilcoxon tests. To describe the results, the following parameters were used: number of observations (n), median, interquartile range, and minimum-maximum range.Panagen displayed pronounced leukostimulatory and leukoprotective effects when combined with chemotherapy. In an ancillary protocol, anticancer effects of a tablet form of Panagen were analyzed. We show that Panagen helps maintain the pre-therapeutic activity level of innate antitumor immunity and induces formation of a peripheral pool of cytotoxic CD8+ perforin+T-cells. Our 3-year follow-up analysis demonstrates that 24% of patients who received Panagen relapsed or died after the therapy, as compared to 45% in the placebo cohort.The data collected in this trial set Panagen as a multi-faceted all-in-one medicine that is capable of simultaneously sustaining hematopoiesis, sparing the innate immune cells from adverse effects of three consecutive rounds of chemotherapy and boosting individual adaptive immunity. Its unique feature is that it is delivered via gastrointestinal tract and acts through the lymphoid system of intestinal mucosa. Taken together, maintenance of the initial levels of innate immunity, development of adaptive cytotoxic immune response and significantly reduced incidence of relapses 3 years after the therapy argue for the anticancer activity of Panagen.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02115984 from 04/07/2014.


Alyamkina E.A.,Novosibirsk State University | Nikolin V.P.,RAS Institute of Cytology and Genetics | Popova N.A.,Novosibirsk State University | Dolgova E.V.,Novosibirsk State University | And 10 more authors.
Genetic Vaccines and Therapy | Year: 2010

Background: Immunization of mice with tumor homogenate after combined treatment with cyclophosphamide (CP) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) preparation is effective at inhibition of growth of tumor challenged after the treatment. It was assumed that this inhibition might be due to activation of the antigen-presenting cells. The purpose was to develop improved antitumor strategy using mice. We studied the combined action of cytostatics doxorubicin (Dox) plus CP with subsequent dsDNA preparation on tumor growth.Methods: Three-month old CBA/Lac mice were used in the experiments. Mice were injected with CP and human dsDNA preparation. The percentage of mature dendritic cells (DCs) was estimated by staining of mononuclear cells isolated from spleen and bone marrow 3, 6, and 9 days later with monoclonal antibodies CD34, CD80, and CD86. In the next set of experiments, mice were given intramuscularly injections of 1-3 × 105tumor cells. Four days later, they were injected intravenously with 6-6.7 mg/kg Dox and intraperitoneally with 100-200 mg/kg CP; 200 mkg human DNA was injected intraperitoneally after CP administration. Differences in tumor size between groups were analyzed for statistical significance by Student's t-test. The MTT-test was done to determine the cytotoxic index of mouse leucocytes from treated groups.Results: The conducted experiments showed that combined treatment with CP and dsDNA preparation produce an increase in the total amount of mature DCs in vivo. Treatment of tumor bearers with preparation of fragmented dsDNA on the background of pretreatment with Dox plus CP demonstrated a strong suppression of tumor growth in two models. RLS, a weakly immunogenic, resistant to alkalyting cytostatics tumor, grew 3.4-fold slower when compared with the control (p < 0.001). In experiment with Krebs-2 tumor, only 2 of the 10 mice in the Dox+CP+DNA group had a palpable tumor on day 16. The cytotoxic index of leucocytes was 86.5% in the Dox+CP+DNA group, but it was 0% in the Dox+CP group.Conclusions: Thus, the set of experiments we performed showed that exogenous dsDNA, when administered on the background of pretreatment with Dox plus CP, has an antitumor effect possibly due to DC activation. © 2010 Alyamkina et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Blinov V.M.,Russian Academy of Medical Sciences | Krasnov G.S.,RAS Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology | Shargunov A.V.,Russian Academy of Medical Sciences | Shurdov M.A.,LLC Panagen | Zverev V.V.,Russian Academy of Medical Sciences
Molecular Biology | Year: 2013

Immunosuppressive domains (ISDs) of viral envelope glycoproteins provide highly pathogenic phenotypes to various retroviruses. The ISD interaction with immune cells leads to an inhibition of the response. As was shown in the 1980s, a 17-amino acid residue of ISD fragment (known as CKS-17) is responsible for this immune modulation. However, the underlying mechanisms were unknown. Thorough research identified activation of signal transduction via the Ras-Raf-MEK-MAPK and PI3K-AKT-mTOR cell pathways as a result of the ISD interaction with immune cells. The result is the decrease in the secretion of stimulatory cytokines (e.g., IL-12) and increase of inhibitory and anti-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-10). One of the receptor tyrosine kinases that triggers signal transduction in these pathways acts as a primary ISD target, while other key regulators, cAMP and diacylglycerol (DAG), act as secondary messengers. Immunosuppressive-like domains are not restricted to retroviruses; an ISD present in Ebola virus envelope glycoproteins determines an extremely severe clinical course of virus-induced hemorrhagic fever. A number of retrovirus-originating ISD-coding regions are found in the human genome. The regions are expressed as parts of the syncytin genes in the placenta, helping to render the mother's immune system tolerant of the placenta and embryo. The review considers the molecular aspects of the retroviral ISD-induced modulation of the host immune system. © 2013 Pleiades Publishing, Inc.


Shargunov A.V.,Russian Academy of Medical Sciences | Krasnov G.S.,Russian Academy of Medical Sciences | Ponomarenko E.A.,Russian Academy of Medical Sciences | Lisitsa A.V.,Russian Academy of Medical Sciences | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Proteome Research | Year: 2014

The Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) is aimed to identify the variety of protein products and transcripts of the number of chromosomes. The Russian part of C-HPP is devoted to the study of the human chromosome 18. Using widely accepted Tophat and SpliceGrapher, a tool for accurate splice sites and alternative mRNA isoforms prediction, we performed the extensive mining of the splice variants of chromosome 18 transcripts and encoded protein products in liver, brain, lung, kidney, blood, testis, derma, and skeletal muscles. About 6.1 billion of the reads represented by 450 billion of the bases have been analyzed. The relative frequencies of splice events as well as gene expression profiles in normal tissues are evaluated. Using ExPASy PROSITE, the novel features and possible functional sites of previously unknown splice variants were highlighted. A set of unique proteotypic peptides enabling the identification of novel alternative protein species using mass-spectrometry is constructed. The revealed data will be integrated into the gene-centric knowledgebase of the Russian part of C-HPP available at http://kb18.ru and http://www.splicing.zz.mu/. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

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