Entity

Time filter

Source Type

North West England, United Kingdom

Liverpool Hope University is a public university in Liverpool, England. As the only ecumenical university in Europe its work has been shaped by Christian principles but embraces those of all faiths and none. The university comprises three faculties – Arts and Humanities, Education, and Science – organised into 19 departments.The university has two campuses, the main Hope Park campus is located in the leafy suburb of Childwall and the second campus, The Creative Campus, is located in Everton, close to the city centre. The university attracts students from some 65 countries worldwide. Liverpool Hope has the highest number of doctorates amongst its staff of all the post-92 universities in England and the best retention rate against benchmark of all the universities in the North West of England. Wikipedia.


Sultan N.,Liverpool Hope University
International Journal of Information Management | Year: 2010

Educational establishments continue to seek opportunities to rationalize the way they manage their resources. The economic crisis that befell the world following the near collapse of the global financial system and the subsequent bailouts of local banks with billions of tax payers' money will continue to affect educational establishments that are likely to discover that governments will have less money than before to invest in them. It is argued in this article that cloud computing is likely to be one of those opportunities sought by the cash-strapped educational establishments in these difficult times and could prove to be of immense benefit (and empowering in some situations) to them due to its flexibility and pay-as-you-go cost structure. Cloud computing is an emerging new computing paradigm for delivering computing services. This computing approach relies on a number of existing technologies, e.g., the Internet, virtualization, grid computing, Web services, etc. The provision of this service in a pay-as-you-go way through (largely) the popular medium of the Internet gives this service a new distinctiveness. In this article, some aspects of this distinctiveness will be highlighted and some light will be shed on the current concerns that might be preventing some organizations from adopting it. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Cousins R.,Liverpool Hope University
Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation | Year: 2013

The ability to recognize and identify people and determine how they may be feeling from looking at their faces is an important skill that people normally achieve effortlessly in infancy. Effective face recognition skills remain essential for social competence throughout the life course. A major cause of impairment in face processing, conventionally known as prosopagnosia, is stroke. In this article, the potentials for acquired prosopagnosia after stroke are examined. The incidence of prosopagnosia after stroke is difficult to establish, but in one clinical sample about half of those who survived a right hemisphere stroke had prosopagnosia. The recently published National Clinical Guideline for Stroke 2012 omits reference to assessment for prosopagnosia, which suggests that the personal distress and negative impact on social life that can accompany prosopagnosia is not fully appreciated or at least not considered a priority after stroke. The few published cases where there has been a focused attempt to provide rehabilitation for chronic prosopagnosia suggest that lesions in face-processing areas are resistant to treatment but that some recovery can accompany extended practice. It is concluded that where there is evidence of prosopagnosia following stroke, treatment should be offered, although rehabilitation may be better focused on supporting and extending existing compensatory strategies, such as the use of voice, body shape, and gait to assist in person recognition and, as an important consequence, social functioning. © 2013 Thomas Land Publishers, Inc. Source


Young C.,Manchester Metropolitan University | Light D.,Liverpool Hope University
Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers | Year: 2013

This paper follows the mobilities between 1958 and 1990 of the dead body of Dr Petru Groza (1884-1958), a significant political figure in post-World War II socialist Romania, to explore the implications for human geography of engaging with the dead. Although there has been a considerable interest in 'geographies of the body' and 'deathscapes', human geography has had relatively little to say about dead bodies. The paper draws on literatures from death studies and dead body politics, as well as research in memory studies, history, anthropology and law, to develop an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the role of the corpse in society, and argues that human geography should do more to consider how dead bodies contribute to the formation of contemporary geographies. To illustrate these points the analysis first explores how the treatment of Groza's corpse and the 'deathwork' associated with it is an example of 'dead body politics'. Second, the analysis draws out the agency of the corpse and its role in a variety of 'deathscapes'. The conclusion considers the implications for human geography of engaging with 'corpse geographies' more generally. © 2012 The Authors. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers © 2012 Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers). Source


Wankhade P.,Liverpool Hope University
International Journal of Public Sector Management | Year: 2011

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the performance measurement in the UK NHS ambulance service documenting various unintended consequences of the current performance framework and to suggest a future research agenda. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews the literature on ambulance performance targets and documents several unintended consequences of the current performance system through an in-depth case study analysis based on interviews with Trust staff and policy experts along with observation of performance review meetings in the chosen Trust. Ethical approval for the study was obtained from a local NHS research ethics committee. Findings: Significant unintended consequences of the ambulance performance targets based on response times have been systematically documented, which are likely to put the target under spotlight, especially that of the eight-minute response. The current policy focus to reform the eight-minute target by making it more stringent has the potential of jeopardising the reform agenda based on developing clinical skills of the paramedics and introducing clinical management in the service. Practical implications: The paper makes an objective assessment of the sustainability of the current policy framework and identifies future lines of enquiry for further research. Originality/value: This paper makes an original contribution in identifying and documenting the disjuncture between stated and unintended consequences of ambulance performance measurement, which will be of value to academics, practitioners and policy makers. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Source


Sultan N.A.,Liverpool Hope University
International Journal of Information Management | Year: 2011

Cloud computing is an emerging new computing paradigm for delivering computing services. The approach relies on a number of existing technologies e.g., the Internet, virtualization and grid computing. However, the provision of this service in a pay-as-you-go way through the popular medium of the Internet renders this computing service approach unique compared with currently available computing service modalities. This article highlights some aspects of this uniqueness and also explores some of the concerns that might be preventing some companies from adopting it. Notwithstanding these concerns, it is argued in this article that cloud computing is likely to prove commercially viable for many small and medium enterprises (SMEs) due to its flexibility and pay-as-you-go cost structure, particularly in the current climate of economic difficulties. A case study of a cloud experience by a British SME is also presented in this study in order to further highlight the perceived values of cloud computing in terms of cost and efficiency for real small enterprises. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

Discover hidden collaborations