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Dai J.,Dalian Medical University | Dai J.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Qi X.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Li H.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Guo X.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group
Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology | Year: 2015

Background and Aims: A meta-analysis was performed to explore the role of the D-dimer in the development of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) in liver cirrhosis. Methods: All papers were searched via PubMed, EMBASE, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wan Fang, and VIP databases. A standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was pooled. Results: Overall, 284 studies were initially identified, of which 21 were included. Cirrhotic patients with PVT had a significantly higher D-dimer concentration than those without PVT (pooled SMD = 1.249, 95%CI = 0.740-1.758). After the portal hypertension-related surgery, cirrhotic patients with PVT had a similar preoperative D-dimer concentration to those without PVT (pooled SMD = 0.820, 95%CI = -0.122-0.286), but a higher postoperative value of D-dimer concentration than those without PVT (pooled SMD = 2.505, 95%CI = 0.975-4.036). Notably, the D-dimer concentration at the 1 st postoperative day was similar between cirrhotic patients with and without PVT (pooled SMD = 0.137, 95%CI = -0.827-1.101), but that at the 7 th post-operative day was higher in cirrhotic patients with PVT than in those without PVT (pooled SMD = 1.224, 95%CI = 0.277-2.171). Conclusion: D-dimer might be regarded as a diagnostic marker for PVT in liver cirrhosis. In addition, postoperative D-dimer testing is worthwhile for the diagnosis of PVT after portal hypertension-related surgery.


Qi X.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Qi X.,PLA Fourth Military Medical University | Dai J.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Jia J.,PLA Fourth Military Medical University | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases | Year: 2015

Background & Aims: Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) increases the technical complexity of liver transplantation (LT). This systematic review and meta-analysis aim to analyze the association of pre-LT PVT with the overall survival after LT. Methods. PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases were used to search for papers related to the association between pre-LT PVT and survival of LT recipients. The differences in the survival rates between the LT recipients with and without pre-LT PVT were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results. Twenty-seven papers were included. Overall meta-analysis showed that the total LT recipients with pre-LT PVT had a significantly lower 1-year survival rate than those without pre-LT PVT (OR=0.733, 95%CI=0.621-0.865; P=0.0002). But no statistically significant difference was observed in the in-hospital (OR=0.713, 95%CI=0.343-1.482; P=0.365), 1-month (OR=0.679, 95%CI=0.345-1.333; P=0.261), or 5-year survival rate (OR=0.788, 95%CI=0.587-1.058; P=0.113). Additionally, the 1-year survival rate was significantly lower in the LT recipients with complete PVT than in those without PVT (OR=0.503, 95%CI=0.295-0.858; P=0.012). However, no statistically significant difference in the 1-year survival rate between them was observed in the meta-analysis of high-quality studies (OR=0.899, 95%CI=0.657-1.230; P=0.505) or that of studies in which LT was performed after 2000 (OR=0.783, 95%CI=0.566-1.083; P=0.140). Conclusion. Pre-LT PVT, especially complete PVT, decreased the 1-year survival rate after LT. However, the detrimental effect of pre-LT PVT on the survival of LT recipients became inconclusive in high-quality studies. Additionally, further well-designed cohort studies should validate the association in patients undergoing LT during the latter years. © 2015, Romanian Society of Gastroenterology. All rights reserved.


Peng Y.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Peng Y.,Dalian Medical University | Qi X.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Tang S.,General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command | And 15 more authors.
Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology | Year: 2016

ABSTRACT: Objectives: Our study aimed to evaluate the discriminative abilities of Child-Pugh, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD), and albumin-bilirubin (ALBI) scores in predicting the in-hospital mortality in cirrhotic patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). Methods: Cirrhotic patients with ACLF admitted between 2010 January and 2014 June were retrospectively reviewed. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROCs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results: One hundred patients were eligible for the Asia-Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver (APASL) criteria. AUROCs of Child-Pugh, MELD, and ALBI scores in predicting the in-hospital mortality was 0.63 (95%CI: 0.52–0.72, P = 0.05), 0.75 (95%CI: 0.65–0.83, P < 0.0001), and 0.53 (95%CI: 0.42–0.63, P = 0.69), respectively. Eighty-eight patients were eligible for the EASL/AASLD criteria. AUROCs of Child-Pugh, MELD, and ALBI scores in predicting the in-hospital mortality were 0.59 (95%CI: 0.48–0.69, P = 0.14), 0.57 (95%CI: 0.46–0.68, P = 0.26), and 0.57 (95%CI: 0.46–0.67, P = 0.29), respectively. There was no significant difference among them. Conclusion: Child-Pugh, MELD, and ALBI scores might be ineffective in predicting the in-hospital mortality of cirrhosis with ACLF. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.


Peng Y.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Qi X.S.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Dai J.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Li H.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Guo X.Z.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group
International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine | Year: 2015

A retrospective study was conducted to compare the performance of Child-Pugh and Model for End-Stage Liver Diseases (MELD) scores for predicting the in-hospital mortality of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with liver cirrhosis. A total of 145 patients with a diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and acute UGIB between July 2013 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed (male/female: 94/51; mean age: 56.77±11.33 years; Child-Pugh class A/B/C: 46/64/35; mean Child-Pugh score: 7.88±2.17; mean MELD score: 7.86±7.22). The in-hospital mortality was 8% (11/145). Areas under receiving-operator characteristics curve (AUROC) for predicting the in-hospital mortality were compared between MELD and Child-Pugh scores. AUROCs for predicting the in-hospital mortality for Child-Pugh and MELD scores were 0.796 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.721-0.858) and 0.810 (95% CI: 0.736-0.870), respectively. The discriminative ability was not significant different between the two scoring systems (P=0.7241). In conclusion, Child-Pugh and MELD scores were similar for predicting the in-hospital mortality of acute UGIB in cirrhotic patients. © 2015 Int J Clin Exp Med. All Rights Reserved.


Deng H.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Deng H.,Dalian Medical University | Qi X.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | Peng Y.,Liver Cirrhosis Study Group | And 8 more authors.
Medical Science Monitor | Year: 2015

Background: Aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (AAR), FIB-4, fibrosis index (FI), and King scores might be alternatives to the use of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for the diagnosis of esophageal varices (EVs) in liver cirrhosis. This study aimed to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy in predicting the presence and severity of EVs in liver cirrhosis. Material/Methods: All patients who were consecutively admitted to our hospital and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy between January 2012 and June 2014 were eligible for this retrospective study. Areas under curve (AUCs) were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and splenectomy. Results: A total of 650 patients with liver cirrhosis were included, and 81.4% of them had moderate-severe EVs. In the overall analysis, the AUCs of these non-invasive scores for predicting moderate-severe EVs and presence of any EVs were 0.506–0.6 and 0.539–0.612, respectively. In the subgroup analysis of patients without UGIB, their AUCs for predicting moderate-severe varices and presence of any EVs were 0.601–0.664 and 0.596–0.662, respectively. In the subgroup analysis of patients without UGIB or splenectomy, their AUCs for predicting moderate- severe varices and presence of any EVs were 0.627–0.69 and 0.607–0.692, respectively. Conclusions: APRI, AAR, FIB-4, FI, and King scores had modest diagnostic accuracy of EVs in liver cirrhosis. They might not be able to replace the utility of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for the diagnosis of EVs in liver cirrhosis. © Med Sci Monit.

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