Painted Post, NY, United States
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News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) has published it’s 2016-2017 Best Radiology Technician Programs ranking for 2016-2017. An online leader for higher education resources and information, AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org compared data from both online and on-campus programs, highlighting the following schools as those receiving top scores: Clarkson College, Valencia College, Weber State University, Idaho State University and Southern Illinois University Carbondale for four-year schools; Pitt Community College, Owensboro Community & Technical College, Somerset Community College, Washtenaw Community College and Chattanooga State Community College for two-year schools. “With higher median pay and job growth projections than many occupations in the U.S., radiology tech programs are a positive choice for college-bound students,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “Hundreds of radiology tech programs are available around the nation, but this list pinpoints the schools who offer the best combination of affordability, quality and flexibility for aspiring radiology technologists.” In order to qualify for the list, AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org requires all schools with a Radiology Technician program to meet several base criteria points. All colleges and universities must be accredited, two- or four-year public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each schools must also offer career placement services to its grads. Each school was ranked and scored by comparing more than a dozen data points, including cost and financial aid reports, student-teacher ratios and more. A full list of the 2016-2017 Best Radiology Technician Programs in the U.S. is included below. More details on the specific data and methodology used can be found at the link below, along with specific information on where each school placed in the ranking: Two-year schools recognized for providing the Best Radiology Technician Programs: Ashland Community and Technical College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Bunker Hill Community College Cape Fear Community College Chattanooga State Community College Chippewa Valley Technical College Columbus State Community College Community College of Denver Cuyahoga Community College East Central College Eastern Maine Community College Galveston College Georgia Northwestern Technical College Guilford Technical Community College Hagerstown Community College Hillsborough Community College Jefferson Community and Technical College Lakeland Community College Lakeshore Technical College Lone Star College Lorain County Community College Middlesex Community College Mountwest Community and Technical College North Arkansas College Northeast Community College Northwest Mississippi Community College Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College Owens Community College Owensboro Community and Technical College Pitt Community College Rend Lake College Rhodes State College Roane State Community College Sinclair College Somerset Community College South Arkansas Community College Southcentral Kentucky Community & Technical College Southeast Arkansas College Southeast Community College Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College Southern Union State Community College SUNY Broome Community College Tallahassee Community College Technical College of the Lowcountry Truckee Meadows Community College Tulsa Community College Washtenaw Community College West Virginia Northern Community College Western Nebraska Community College Western Wyoming Community College Four-year schools recognized for providing the Best Radiology Technician Programs: Arkansas State University - Main Campus Baptist Memorial College of Health Sciences Bellevue College Bluefield State College Boise State University Briar Cliff University Broward College Clarkson College College of Southern Nevada Concordia University - Wisconsin Daytona State College Eastern Florida State College Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Gulf Coast State College Idaho State University Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale La Roche College LIU Post Miami Dade College Minot State University Missouri Southern State University Morehead State University Mount Aloysius College Newman University Notre Dame of Maryland University Palm Beach State College Pensacola State College Saint Catharine College Santa Fe College Shawnee State University Siena Heights University South Florida State College Southern Illinois University - Carbondale Southwestern Oklahoma State University St. Catherine University St. Luke's College St. Petersburg College State College of Florida - Manatee-Sarasota Suffolk University University of Charleston University of Cincinnati - Blue Ash College University of Hartford University of Jamestown University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Sioux Falls University of St Francis Valencia College Vincennes University Weber State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A ranking of the top collegiate Vocational & Trade Education Programs in New York has been released by the Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) for 2016-2017. Comparing data on student success and support services, program variety and nearly a dozen other qualitative and quantitative measures, the site highlighted a total of 64 colleges and universities for excellence in trade and vocational education in the state. Top scoring schools include SUNY Canton, Trocaire College, Farmingdale State College, Rochester Institute of Technology, Touro College, Monroe Community College, Niagara County Community College, Mohawk Valley Community College, Tompkins Cortland Community College and SUNY Broome Community College. “U.S. Department of Labor projections show many trade and vocational industries growing at a faster-than-average rate through the year 2024,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “New York provides an excellent learning environment for trade and vocational learners; over five dozen schools in the state are on our list for providing a top-quality education and a jump-start to a job with career placement and other success support programs.” The Community for Accredited Online Schools sets strict criteria for their rankings. Schools must qualify for the list by being regionally accredited, public or private not-for-profit entities. For the Best Trade & Vocational Education Programs in New York list, the site also required schools offer career placement and counseling services to students. All qualifying schools are scored and ranked based on additional school-specific data, such as student-teacher ratios and financial aid offerings. For more details on the data and methodology used to determine the Best Trade & Vocational Education Programs in New York, and to view a complete list of schools and scores, visit: Two-year schools recognized on the Best Trade & Vocational Education in New York, 2016-2017 list: Bramson ORT College Bronx Community College Cayuga County Community College Columbia-Greene Community College Corning Community College CUNY Borough of Manhattan Community College CUNY LaGuardia Community College Dutchess Community College Erie Community College Finger Lakes Community College Fulton-Montgomery Community College Genesee Community College Herkimer County Community College Hostos Community College Hudson Valley Community College Jamestown Community College Jefferson Community College Jefferson Lewis BOCES - Practical Nursing Program Kingsborough Community College Memorial Hospital School of Radiation Therapy Technology Mohawk Valley Community College Monroe Community College Nassau Community College Niagara County Community College Onondaga Community College Professional Business College Queensborough Community College Rockland Community College Samaritan Hospital School of Nursing Schenectady County Community College Suffolk County Community College SUNY Broome Community College SUNY Orange SUNY Sullivan SUNY Ulster SUNY Westchester Community College Tompkins Cortland Community College Four-year schools recognized on the Best Trade & Vocational Education in New York, 2016-2017 list: College of Staten Island CUNY Culinary Institute of America CUNY Medgar Evers College CUNY New York City College of Technology Daemen College Farmingdale State College Hilbert College LIU Post Maria College Marist College Medaille College Mercy College Molloy College Morrisville State College New York Institute of Technology New York University Pace University - New York Paul Smiths College of Arts and Science Pratt Institute - Main Rochester Institute of Technology SUNY College of Agriculture and Technology at Cobleskill SUNY College of Technology at Alfred SUNY College of Technology at Canton SUNY College of Technology at Delhi Touro College Trocaire College Vaughn College of Aeronautics and Technology Villa Maria College About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best schools with online programs in the state of New York for 2017. More than 70 schools were ranked overall, with Columbia University, New York University, Cornell University, Syracuse University and University at Buffalo coming in as the top four-year schools. Among two-year schools, Monroe Community College, Niagara County Community College, Hudson Valley Community College, Genesee Community College and Tompkins Cortland Community College earned top spots. “College-bound students have many options for post-secondary education in New York state, but they don’t necessarily need to travel to a campus to be successful,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “The schools on this list are strong examples of what today’s online learning is all about: providing quality education to enhance student success outside of a traditional classroom environment.” Schools on the Best Online Schools list must meet specific base requirements to be included: each must be institutionally accredited and be classified as public or private not-for-profit. Each college was also scored based on additional criteria that includes cost and financial aid, variety of program offerings, student-teacher ratios, graduation rates, employment services and more. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: New York’s Best Online Four-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Adelphi University Canisius College Clarkson University Columbia University in the City of New York Concordia College-New York Cornell University CUNY Graduate School and University Center CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice Dominican College of Blauvelt D'Youville College Fordham University Hofstra University Ithaca College Jewish Theological Seminary of America Keuka College LIU Post Marist College Medaille College Mercy College Metropolitan College of New York Mount Saint Mary College New York Institute of Technology New York University Niagara University Nyack College Pace University-New York Roberts Wesleyan College Rochester Institute of Technology Saint John Fisher College Saint Joseph's College-New York St. Bonaventure University St. John's University-New York St. Thomas Aquinas College Stony Brook University SUNY at Albany SUNY at Binghamton SUNY Buffalo State SUNY College at Brockport SUNY College at Oswego SUNY College at Plattsburgh SUNY College of Technology at Canton SUNY College of Technology at Delhi SUNY Empire State College SUNY Institute of Technology at Utica-Rome SUNY Maritime College SUNY Oneonta Syracuse University The College of Saint Rose The New School The Sage Colleges New York’s Best Two Year Online Schools for 2017 include the following: Bramson ORT College Cayuga Community College Corning Community College CUNY Borough of Manhattan Community College Finger Lakes Community College Fulton-Montgomery Community College Genesee Community College Herkimer College Hostos Community College Hudson Valley Community College Jamestown Community College Jefferson Community College Mohawk Valley Community College Monroe Community College Niagara County Community College North Country Community College Suffolk County Community College SUNY Broome Community College SUNY Orange SUNY Ulster SUNY Westchester Community College Tompkins Cortland Community College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


Snekser J.L.,LIU Post | Itzkowitz M.,Lehigh University
Ethology | Year: 2014

Biparental care of young occurs when both parents provide some sort of care for offspring and can include a wide variety of behaviors, yet often studies focus on single aspects of parental care when trying to determine how each parent contributes. Here, we presented the biparental convict cichlid fish (Amatitlania nigrofasciata) with two conflicting parental behaviors: retrieval of non-swimming offspring that have been displaced from the nest and defense against a conspecific intruder, a potential brood predator. We examined single males, single females, and pairs of parents to determine how males and females each contributed to overall parental care. Traditionally in this species, parents exhibit a division of labor (in which each parent contributes to all parental activities), but also exhibit a division of roles (in which males tend to favor the role of defense and females tend to favor more direct care, spending more time with offspring). We hypothesized that single parents would compensate for their absent mate, but that males and females would still favor preferred roles. Additionally, we hypothesized that there would be an asymmetrical expansion of roles, with females being more flexible. Our results show that the preferred roles of both parents were evident even when parents were without their mates and that males and females differed in their compensatory levels, at least when compared to the behaviors of the intact pair. Contrary to our prediction, females seem unable to fully compensate for the defensive behaviors usually exhibited by males, while males shifted completely to retrieve displaced offspring. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

There are very few scenarios where I could see myself considering the flesh of a fellow human being as food, and the ultimatum "eat today or die tomorrow" comes up in all of them. Most people are probably with me on this. But Bill Schutt's newest book, Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History, reveals that from a scientific perspective, there's a predictable calculus for when humans and animals go cannibal. And far more humans — and animals — have dipped into the world of cannibalism than you might have imagined. Schutt, a vertebrate zoologist at LIU Post and the American Museum of Natural History, dives into cannibalism's history, its place in the kingdom Animalia and the source of its taboo. The book encompasses a range of stories far wider than the usual canon of gruesome reports. He makes no secret of his distaste for these over-sensationalized accounts, not because of the gore but because there's just so much more to cannibalism. Instead, he opts for a keenly scientific approach. "I'm taking things that seem grotesque and misunderstood and horrify people and putting it through the eyes of zoologist," he says. And what does a zoologist see, exactly? He sees the perfect, natural sense of cannibalism, the evolutionary biology of eating one's own kind and, oddly, the wonder of it all. Macabre summaries of men eating men are present, too, but by far the most interesting section on human cannibalism in the book is Schutt's description of the long history of European aristocrats eating human parts as medicine. "Upper-class types and even members of the British Royalty 'applied, drink or wore' concoctions prepared from human body parts, and they continued to do so until the end of the 18th century," Schutt writes in the book. We caught up with Schutt to chat about the book. The interview below has been edited for length and clarity: I hadn't heard of the medicinal cannibalism you described in Europe, starting with the Ancient Greek physician Galen of Pergamon and continuing to the 20th century. That was one thing that really surprised me. Yeah, especially given the Western taboo around cannibalism, which has been around since the time of the Greeks, to find out that for hundreds of years, for many countries in Europe, pretty much every body part you can think of was used to cure something or the other. That was a complete shock. I don't even know where some of these [purported cures] came from. That blood was going to cure epilepsy or how human fat could cure skin diseases? The most interesting one to me was mummies, and I think that was a mistranslation. To the Arabs ... the word mumia meant this stuff they used to bind wounds and prep mummies. In the translations, the Europeans thought they meant real mummies had medicinal values, so they started grinding [mummies] up. How did you get to seeing cannibalism as something that was really, very natural? Cannibalism as a behavior has various functions – from parental care to a reproductive strategy to foraging. If you look at insects, snails, crustaceans, fish, toads, salamanders, there's plenty of cannibalism. When you're talking about cob fish and the million eggs they lay, they're not looking at [their eggs] like juniors. They're like a handful of raisins. It's just food. My favorite is these legless amphibians, or caecilians. The mother provides her skin to the young hatchlings, and they peel her skin like a grape. That to me was wild and amazing, and I'd never heard of it. When you get to mammals, it's rarer because you're dealing with less offspring and [more] parental care. The cannibalism you do see sometimes takes place because of environmental stresses. Seems like the decision to cannibalize is a pretty simple calculus. You do it when the need for food outweighs the risk of getting a disease. Yup. Though when you're starving, I don't know if you're thinking, 'This person might have a disease I could catch.' No, you're just at the end of your rope, and you're going to die. It's natural behavior. Scientists have looked at starvation. At a certain point, one of the predictable behaviors that you'll see is cannibalism. It could start with dead bodies and then get to the extreme where you kill somebody and eat them. Then there's the case where some people will just not eat dead bodies and starve to death. There's plenty of mammals and animals that don't practice the kind of parental care, or sexual cannibalism or that lifeboat strategy. But if you stress any creature out enough, I think the odds are that they'll eat their own kind. In the book, you describe getting invited over for dinner by one of your sources to eat her placenta. How was that? Was it good? Yeah, it was really the prep that made it taste good. Granted, the [husband] was a chef and so he knew how to prepare it osso bucco style and used a really nice wine I had brought. It smelled great. It didn't taste bad. I wouldn't do it again. I don't have any regrets I did this. She said that after birth, she had all sorts of ups and downs, baby blues and stuff like that. Somebody turned her onto this and she tried and it she said she felt a lot better. She readily acknowledged that it was probably a placebo effect. Which is a real thing. Would you eat another human – not a placenta? Not because of overcrowding, predation, competition or hunger. Just ... because? No. If I was put into a life or death situation like the guys who got stranded in the Andes, or in a besieged city with no alternatives, then I can't say that I wouldn't consume human flesh. Would I do it again, just for kicks? Why would I? There's no need for that. Not unless it really came down to a real horror situation where there was nothing else to eat. I try not to think about that as a possibility.


Kiesel A.L.,Saint Joseph's University | Snekser J.L.,LIU Post | Ruhl N.,Ohio University | McRobert S.P.,Saint Joseph's University
Behaviour | Year: 2012

While many behavioural syndrome studies focus on individual-level correlations of behaviors across various contexts, it is also possible to examine these syndromes on a population level, comparing various species or groups. In this study we tested wild type zebrafish (Danio rerio), longfin zebrafish (Danio rerio lof mutants) and the closely related pearl danio (Danio albolineatus) to determine whether aggression and boldness varied and whether population-level differences in these behavioural types were linked to differences in shoaling preferences among the three Danio types. We found significant differences in overall levels of boldness and aggression between the three Danio groups. Pearl danios were the most 'aggressive' type, and wildtype zebrafish were relatively 'passive'. In contrast, wildtype zebrafish showed the most 'boldness' while longfin zebrafish were comparatively 'shy'. We also found subsequent differences in social behaviour, with pearl danios showing significant preferences for conspecific shoals. Our results indicate that fish may not only be making social decisions based on the behaviour, health and appearance of potential shoal mates, but their own temperament may be important in mediating social interactions as well. © 2012 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden.

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