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Gao Q.,University of Jinan | Dong X.,University of Jinan | Fu D.,Linyi University
Procedia Computer Science | Year: 2015

This paper adopts a new approach to searching the users with similar interests by mobile network services instead of by desktop users. First, the direct trust is calculated based on the mobile users' behavior and the weight of the corresponding context (time and position), then an indirect trust degree calculation method is proposed according to the propagation distance based on the theory of the six degrees of separation; secondly this paper further uses the evaluation score about a certain mobile web service given by a mobile user to calculate the preference similarity degree between different users. Finally based on the time attenuation function it tries to find the users with similar preference, so as to make use of the neighbor users' preference profile to dynamically update the target user's preference profile. Simulation shows that the proposed approach outperforms pure sliding window method and pure forgetting strategy method which fail to take the context mobile information into consideration in terms of Recall Ratio and Precision Ratio. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.


PubMed | Linyi University and University of Jinan
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) | Year: 2016

In this paper, a new approach is adopted to update the user preference profile by seeking users with similar interests based on the context obtainable for a mobile network instead of from desktop networks. The trust degree between mobile users is calculated by analyzing their behavior based on the context, and then the approximate neighbors are chosen by combining the similarity of the mobile user preference and the trust degree. The approach first considers the communication behaviors between mobile users, the mobile network services they use as well as the corresponding context information. Then a similarity degree of the preference between users is calculated with the evaluation score of a certain mobile web service provided by a mobile user. Finally, based on the time attenuation function, the users with similar preference are found, through which we can dynamically update the target users preference profile. Experiments are then conducted to test the effect of the context on the credibility among mobile users, the effect of time decay factors and trust degree thresholds. Simulation shows that the proposed approach outperforms two other methods in terms of Recall Ratio, Precision Ratio and Mean Absolute Error, because neither of them consider the context mobile information.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

New research from North Carolina State University, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Linyi University has found evidence of original keratin and melanosome preservation in a 130-million-year-old Eoconfuciusornis specimen. The work extends the timeframe in which original molecules may preserve, and demonstrates the ability to distinguish between ancient microstructures in fossils. Eoconfuciusornis, crow-sized primitive birds that lived in what is now China around 130 million years ago, are the earliest birds to have a keratinous beak and no teeth, like modern birds. Previous studies argued that the feathers of these and other ancient birds and dinosaurs preserved small, round structures interpreted to be melanosomes - pigment-containing organelles that, along with other pigments, give feathers their color. However, without additional evidence, it was not possible to prove that these structures weren't just microbes that had coated the feather during decomposition and fossilization. Yanhong Pan, associate research fellow at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and corresponding author of a paper describing the research and co-author Mary Schweitzer, NC State professor of biology with a joint appointment at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, examined feathers from an Eoconfuciusornis specimen taken from the Jehol Biota site in northern China, which is renowned for excellent fossil preservation. "If these small bodies are melanosomes, they should be embedded in a keratinous matrix, since feathers contain beta-keratin," Schweitzer says. "If we couldn't find the keratin, then those structures could as easily be microbes, or a mix of microbes and melanosomes - in either case, predictions of dinosaur shading would not be accurate." Pan, Schweitzer and their team used both scanning and transmission electron microscopy to get microscopic details of the feather's surface and its internal structure. They also utilized immunogold labeling - in which gold particles are attached to antibodies that bind to particular proteins in order to make them visible in electron microscopy - to show that filaments within the feathers were keratin. Finally, they mapped copper and sulfur to these feathers at high resolution. Sulfur was broadly distributed, reflecting its presence in both keratin and melanin molecules in modern feathers. However copper, which is only found in modern melanosomes, and not part of keratin, was only observed in the fossil melanosomes. These findings both support the identity of the melanosomes and indicate that there was no mixing or leaching during decomposition and fossilization. "This study is the first to demonstrate evidence for both keratin and melanosomes, using structural, chemical and molecular methods," says Pan. "These methods have the potential to help us understand - on the molecular level - how and why feathers evolved in these lineages."


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New research from North Carolina State University, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Linyi University has found evidence of original keratin and melanosome preservation in a 130-million-year-old Eoconfuciusornis specimen. The work extends the timeframe in which original molecules may preserve, and demonstrates the ability to distinguish between ancient microstructures in fossils. Eoconfuciusornis, crow-sized primitive birds that lived in what is now China around 130 million years ago, are the earliest birds to have a keratinous beak and no teeth, like modern birds. Previous studies argued that the feathers of these and other ancient birds and dinosaurs preserved small, round structures interpreted to be melanosomes - pigment-containing organelles that, along with other pigments, give feathers their color. However, without additional evidence, it was not possible to prove that these structures weren't just microbes that had coated the feather during decomposition and fossilization. Yanhong Pan, associate research fellow at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and corresponding author of a paper describing the research and co-author Mary Schweitzer, NC State professor of biology with a joint appointment at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, examined feathers from an Eoconfuciusornis specimen taken from the Jehol Biota site in northern China, which is renowned for excellent fossil preservation. "If these small bodies are melanosomes, they should be embedded in a keratinous matrix, since feathers contain beta-keratin," Schweitzer says. "If we couldn't find the keratin, then those structures could as easily be microbes, or a mix of microbes and melanosomes - in either case, predictions of dinosaur shading would not be accurate." Pan, Schweitzer and their team used both scanning and transmission electron microscopy to get microscopic details of the feather's surface and its internal structure. They also utilized immunogold labeling - in which gold particles are attached to antibodies that bind to particular proteins in order to make them visible in electron microscopy - to show that filaments within the feathers were keratin. Finally, they mapped copper and sulfur to these feathers at high resolution. Sulfur was broadly distributed, reflecting its presence in both keratin and melanin molecules in modern feathers. However copper, which is only found in modern melanosomes, and not part of keratin, was only observed in the fossil melanosomes. These findings both support the identity of the melanosomes and indicate that there was no mixing or leaching during decomposition and fossilization. "This study is the first to demonstrate evidence for both keratin and melanosomes, using structural, chemical and molecular methods," says Pan. "These methods have the potential to help us understand - on the molecular level - how and why feathers evolved in these lineages." The work appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The research was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (EAR-1344198), the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China. NC State's Wenxia Zheng and Elena Schroeter, and Alison Moyer (now at Drexel University), the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Zhonghe Zhou, Jingmai K. O'Connor and Min Wang, and Linyi University's Xiaoting Zheng and Xiaoli Wang contributed to the work. Note to editors: An abstract of the paper follows "Molecular evidence of keratin and melanosomes in feathers of the Early Cretaceous bird Eoconfuciusornis" Authors: Yanhong Pan, Zhonghe Zhou, Jingmai K. O'Connor and Min Wang, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Mary Schweitzer, Wenxia Zheng and Elena Schroeter, NC State University; Alison Moyer, NC State and Drexel University; Xiaoting Zheng and Xiaoli Wang, Linyi University Published: in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Microbodies associated with feathers of both non-avian dinosaurs and early birds were first identified as bacteria, but have been reinterpreted as melanosomes. While melanosomes in modern feathers are always surrounded by and embedded in keratin, the preservation of melanosomes embedded in keratin in fossils has not been previously demonstrated. Here, we provide multiple independent molecular analyses of both microbodies and the associated matrix recovered from feathers of a new specimen of the basal bird Eoconfuciusornis from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota of China. Our work represents the oldest ultrastructural and immunological recognition of avian beta-keratin from an Early Cretaceous (~130 Ma) bird. Furthermore, for the first time, we apply immunogold to identify protein epitopes at high resolution, by localizing antibody-antigen complexes to specific fossil ultrastructures. Retention of original keratinous proteins in the matrix surrounding electron-opaque microbodies supports their assignment as melanosomes and adds to the criteria employable to distinguish melanosomes from microbial bodies. Our work sheds new light on molecular preservation within normally labile tissues preserved in ancient fossils.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.sciencenewsdaily.org

A small red-crested dinosaur from the Late Jurassic era could help us unlock the origins of flight, now that we have a better idea of what it looked like. Using high-powered lasers, scientists from the University of Hong Kong have illuminated previously invisible soft tissues of the foot-tall Anchiornis, providing, for the first time, a detailed outline of the avian-like creature. The quantitative reconstruction of Anchiornis, which was first discovered in northeastern China in 2009, show that the animal possessed drumstick-shaped legs, long forearms connected by wing-like membranes, foot scales, and a slender tail. "The detail was so well lit[...] A chicken-sized, feathered dinosaur that scuttled around Earth 160 million years ago is helping flesh out the missing link between land-bound animals and flying ones, scientists said Tuesday. WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A technique using high-powered lasers to reveal hidden soft tissue alongside bones in fossils is giving scientists insight into one of the major evolutionary transitions ... Animals Soft tissues abound Paleontologists donned dark glasses that made their surroundings even more eerie, and pulled out a small but high powered violet laser that they ... This feathered dinosaur is revealing clues on the origin of flight By using high-powered lasers on ancient fossils, we now have a good idea what one species of feathered dinosaur probably looked like. Researchers from the University of Hong Kong and Linyi University in China used laser-stimulated fluorescence imaging on nine specimens of the bird-like dinosaur, Anchiornis. New details of feathered dinosaur could elucidate the origins of flight A small red-crested dinosaur from the Late Jurassic era could help us unlock the origins of flight, now that we have a better idea of what it looked like. Using high-powered lasers, scientists ...


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

A life reconstruction of the bird-like feathered dinosaur Anchiornis, using the new body outline laser-stimulated fluorescence data is pictured in this undated handout image obtained by Reuters February 28, 2017. Julius T. Csotonyi/Handout via REUTERS WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A technique using high-powered lasers to reveal hidden soft tissue alongside bones in fossils is giving scientists insight into one of the major evolutionary transitions in the history of life: small feathered dinosaurs taking flight as birds. Scientists said on Tuesday they used the method on fossils of the chicken-sized, feathered, bird-like dinosaur Anchiornis that lived in China about 160 million years ago, finding it possessed drumstick-shaped legs, arms similar to the wings of some modern gliding and soaring birds, and a long, slender tail. There has been a debate over whether or not to classify this Jurassic Period creature as a bird, considering its avian features. Either way, it boasts numerous skeletal and soft tissue characteristics found in birds and lived close to the time when birds diverged from their bird-like dinosaur ancestors. Archaeopteryx, which lived in Germany about 150 million years ago, long has been considered the earliest-known bird. If a person had a chance to see Anchiornis alive, the reaction might be, "That's a weird-looking bird," said University of Hong Kong paleontologist Michael Pittman, who helped lead the study published in the journal Nature Communications. The scientists employed a technique called laser-stimulated fluorescence, or LSF, that directs high-powered lasers at the fossils in a dark room to make unseen soft tissues like skin and the shape of the muscles beneath it glow. The study produced the first highly detailed body outline of such a feathered dinosaur, "a real landmark in our understanding of avian origins," Pittman said. The study revealed it had a shallow area of soft tissue in front of the elbow, called the propatagium, that is the leading edge of bird wings and is crucial for flight. But it is unclear whether Anchiornis could get airborne. "Some scientists believe it could glide based on the long, robust and feathered arms -- wings -- it has, but others disagree because its flight feathers are not well designed for flight," said the study's other co-leader, paleontologist Xiaoli Wang of Linyi University in China. "We believe it probably had some kind of aerodynamic capability." Anchiornis was covered in feathers resembling those of modern birds. It had foot scales like those of a chicken. But it lacked the bony breastbone, or sternum, and short tail skeletons found in modern birds. It had small, sharp teeth like those of the earliest birds, and may have eaten small animals like lizards.


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.sciencenewsdaily.org

New research from North Carolina State University, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Linyi University has found evidence of original keratin and melanosome preservation in a 130-million-year-old Eoconfuciusornis specimen. The work extends the timeframe in which original molecules may preserve, and demonstrates the ability to distinguish between ancient microstructures in fossils. New molecular clues in 130-million-year-old bird fossil could help paleontologists firm up case for ancient color in dinosaurs. New research from North Carolina State University, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Linyi University has found evidence of original keratin and melanosome preservation in a 130-million-year-old ... Keratin and melanosomes preserved in 130-million-year-old bird fossil, Mon 21 Nov 16 from ScienceDaily 130-Million-Year Old Proteins Still Present in Dinosaur-Age Fossil Microscopic pigment structures and proteins that graced the feathers of a Cretaceous-age bird are still present in its 130-million-year-old fossil, a new study finds. Dinosaurs could finally show their true colours: Oldest ever red pigment is found in a 130 million-year-old feather A team of international scientists, led by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, made the breakthrough that could enable us to tell what colour feathered dinosaurs were. Feathers on This 130-Million-Year-Old Fossil Still Contain Traces of Color An exquisitely preserved fossil found in China still contains the original biological compounds that gave a 130-million-year-old bird its shading and color. The find extends the timeframe in ... NewsNew evidence has been found of original keratin and melanosome preservation in a 130-million-year-old Eoconfuciusornis specimen. The work extends the timeframe in which original molecules ... Brooks HaysRALEIGH, N.C., Nov. 21 (UPI) -- Keratin and melanosomes can remain preserved and later identified in fossilized tissue. The revelation comes thanks to the discovery of an ancient ...


In this paper, we consider the global error bound and algorithm for the generalized linear complementarity problem over a polyhedral cone (GLCP) on economic model. To this end, we first establish a global error bound without increasing the dimensions of variables under weaker condition than that discussed in Sun et al. (2009, 2013) for GLCP. Based on the error bound result, we also propose an algorithm for solving the problem, and its global convergence is also established. © 2015, ICIC International.


Zhu R.,Qufu Normal University | Li D.,Qufu Normal University | Zhu L.,Linyi University
Journal of Computational Information Systems | Year: 2015

Acquiring clear images of underground cultural relics is an important issue in in digital museum studies. In this paper, a novel method which can improve the cultural relic image based on Shearlet transform is presented. Firstly, the Shearlet transform is utilized to decompose the source Cultural relic image on various scales and in different directions, and the low frequency coefficients and high frequent coefficients are obtained. Secondly, we apply fuzzy contrast enhancement to the low frequency coefficients. Third, we apply fuzzy enhancement on each scale and direction to high frequency coefficients. Finally, the clear image is obtained by performing the inverse Shearlet transform on the combined coefficients. Experimental results show that this algorithm can effectively improve the overall brightness of the Cultural Relic Image, and enhance the contrast of the Cultural Relic Image. ©, 2015, Binary Information Press. All right reserved.


Song B.G.,LinYi University
Advanced Materials Research | Year: 2013

This paper reviews the network distance education teaching mode, Using the computer education as an example, the analysis of the computer aided teaching method the results in the application of quantitative and qualitative analysis method. Make a certain university 2005 freshmen do level test, according to the principle of no significant difference will be divided into a whole new N. Randomly selected two whole (62) for the test group to participate in university computer teaching reform. At the same time, select the other two whole (62) as the reference object for regular teaching. Period, and the two groups of students in four tests, and the four scores on the quantitative analysis; The network distance education in computer aided teaching experience of teachers and students class separately carried on the interview, At the same time, to student's online autonomous learning time and content monitoring and statistics, and student test scores were compared. © (2013) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

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