Baker City, OR, United States
Baker City, OR, United States

Linfield College is an American private institution of higher learning located in McMinnville, Oregon. As a four-year, undergraduate, liberal arts and science college with a campus in Portland, Oregon, it also has an adult degree program located online and in eight communities throughout the state. Linfield Wildcats athletics participates in the NCAA Division III Northwest Conference. There are a combined 2,266 students at Linfield, which employs more than 153 full-time professors at the 195-acre campus. Wikipedia.

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News Article | June 23, 2017
Site: www.wineindustryadvisor.com

McMinnville, OR • June 23, 2017 • Gregory V. Jones, known globally as one of the preeminent wine climatologists, has been named director of wine education at Linfield College. “I am proud that Greg Jones will lead our wine education program,” said Linfield President Thomas L. Hellie. “He has earned an international reputation for his research on wine, climate and the environment; I think he’s a perfect fit for Linfield.” Jones is a research climatologist who focuses on how terroir influences wine production. He studies in particular the effect climate changes have on vine growth, fruit production and the resulting wine quality. He regularly conducts research for the wine industry in Oregon and has given hundreds of presentations on climate and wine regionally, nationally and internationally. He was a contributing author to the 2008 Nobel Peace Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Report, as well as the author of many book chapters, reports and articles on wine economics, climate change and climatological assessments of viticultural potential. “I’m excited to come to a small, private liberal arts college that is student-centered and regionally engaged, and in the heart of the Oregon wine industry,” Jones said. Linfield, Jones said, “has tremendous potential for academic, community and industry engagement with wine production in Oregon.” Jones will start at Linfield August 15. He replaces Ellen Brittan, the founding director of wine education at Linfield, who decided recently to return to Brittan Vineyards full-time. Jones holds a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences with a concentration in the Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Virginia. He has been a faculty member at Southern Oregon University since 1997, and SOU’s Director of the Division of Business, Communication and the Environment since 2014. David Beck, co-owner of the Crawford Beck Vineyard in Amity and former chair of the Oregon Wine Board, said Linfield “scored a major coup” with the hire. “Dr. Jones is widely known for the quality of his scientific publications and his leadership in his field,” Beck said. “The partnership between Linfield and Dr. Jones will surely enhance Linfield’s contributions to undergraduate education in the study of the wine industry.” Jones was named one of the Top 50 Wine Industry Leaders by Wine Business Monthly in 2016, one of the 100 most influential people in the U.S. wine industry in 2012 and 2013 by intowine.com and the Oregon Wine Press Wine Person of the Year for 2009. Most recently, he became only the 10th American to be named an Infanção (nobleman) by the Confraria do Vinho do Porto for his work with the Portuguese wine industry. Linfield is the first college in the country to offer an interdisciplinary liberal arts degree in wine studies. It currently offers a wine studies minor that can be paired with a wide selection of majors, and is in the process of developing a wine and sustainable systems major. Benefitting from its location in the heart of Oregon’s vineyard country, Linfield also offers wine management and wine marketing certificates online, provides a summer wine-industry immersion program and hosts one of the world’s premier wine events—the International Pinot Noir Celebration—each summer. “While at Linfield, I plan to continue my research and outreach throughout Oregon, California and the Pacific Northwest,” Jones said, “while maintaining a strong presence as a leader of numerous national and international research teams and organizations devoted to studying viticulture and wine production.”


News Article | June 8, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

NORTH BEND, Ore.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Oregon Virtual Academy (ORVA), an online public charter school, will hold an in-person graduation ceremony to celebrate the Class of 2017 on Saturday, June 10, at 2 p.m. at Willamette University’s Smith Hall. One hundred students will graduate from ORVA, which serves students statewide in kindergarten through 12th grade. The rigorous and engaging curriculum includes Advanced Placement® courses for high school students. Dual enrollment opportunities to earn college credits are available for qualified high school students in select courses, as well. ORVA also offers credit recovery opportunities. The ORVA Class of 2017 valedictorian is Megan Adrian, and Phela Chuey is the salutatorian. Both students will address their classmates, along with interim head of school Dr. Debbi Chrisop, board chair Mark Horning, senior advisor Carissa Trepka, high school principal Jennifer Tracewell, and student Breonna North, who will provide a tribute to learning coaches. “Graduation is an opportunity to celebrate our students’ success and wish them well on their future endeavors,” said Dr. Chrisop. “These are incredible students, and we have been privileged to have been a part of their education.” Collectively, the Class of 2017 report that they have been offered $250,000 in college scholarships. The students have reported that they have been accepted to colleges and universities across the region, including the University of Oregon, Oregon State University, Portland State University, University of Portland, Linfield College, Pacific University, University of Washington, University of Denver and Montana State University. Some students also plan to enlist in the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army, as well as the police academy. ORVA’s students have built strong relationships with their classmates during their time with the school. They interact with each other through their virtual classrooms, as well as discussion threads and instant messaging. In addition, ORVA’s active, supportive school community organizes fun monthly activities where students can get together in person. The school also offers a wide range of clubs. Graduation allows the students to celebrate their accomplishment together. Media are welcome to attend this event. Details are as follows: Oregon Virtual Academy (ORVA) is an online public charter school authorized by the North Bend School District and open to students in kindergarten through 12th grade throughout the state of Oregon. As part of the Oregon public school system, ORVA is tuition-free, giving parents and families the choice to access the curriculum provided by K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN), the nation’s leading provider of K-12 proprietary curriculum and online education programs. For more information about ORVA, visit http://orva.k12.com. K12 Inc. (NYSE: LRN) is driving innovation and advancing the quality of education by delivering state-of-the-art, digital learning platforms and technology to students and school districts across the globe. K12’s curriculum serves over 2,000 schools and school districts and has delivered more than four million courses over the past decade. K12 is a company consisting of thousands of online school educators providing instruction, academic services, and learning solutions to public schools and districts, traditional classrooms, blended school programs, and directly to families. The K12 program is offered through K12 partner public schools in 33 states and the District of Columbia, and through private schools serving students in all 50 states and more than 100 countries. More information can be found at K12.com.


News Article | June 27, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

-- In the new book, Nurse SPARKS, Sharon Buller, BSN, RN writes about her journey as a nurse and how a loved one's illness changed her outlookIn a story titled, "Found a Way," Sharon shares the story about visiting her stepfather-in-law near the end of his life was the "A-ha" moment that she needed.Sharon says, "I felt so very amazing to know that I was able to hold space for his release and help him move through his transition peacefully. Energy healing has saved my life personally. Currently, with my RN license, I work with special needs individuals in their homes, writing up their assessments, protocols, and education and then training around the protocols I write. I am able to utilize my intuition and to hold the space for the families and my clients."Sharon Buller received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Linfield College in 1994. Over the next four years, her career expanded from the hospital and clinics into the Public Health arena. In 1998, Sharon began her own business as an RN Consultant and expanded in 2002. She returned to Linfield as an Adjunct Clinical Instructor for three years. She continues her business, Aloha Holistic Wellness, today. The truth of Energy Medicine, drew Sharon in, after being introduced to it while attending Linfield. Studying Dr. Bruce Lipton, The Biology of Belief, opened that truth completely in her world. Over the years, she has been drawn to and studied many modalities; beginning with Quantum Touch, Body Talk, Body Talk Access, Access Consciousness, Access Consciousness BARs, Crystals and Chakra Healing, Donna Eden's Energy Medicine, and Matrix Energetics. Sharon is a Psych-K Coach, a MBTI Certified Coach, and Energy Medicine Life Coach. She utilizes tools that support the body healing itself such as Sound Vitality, Crystal bowls, trinfinity8, Redox Signaling Molecules, Bemer, flower essences, and oils.Sharon has three beautiful grown children and a kitty who adopted her two years ago, just as her seventeen-year-old loving cat passed on. Her love is sharing the outdoors with Mother Nature and her significant other; hiking, kayaking, camping, and reading.Compiled by Authentic Messengers and Anita Stewart, RN, edited by Allison Saia, and published by Positive Media Press, Nurse SPARKS is filled with the stories of nurses from across the nation. Stories that reveal what it feels like to be working in a field that takes all of your heart and soul on a daily basis. A career that sometimes takes one to their knees, sends one home crying, exhausted, and spent of all energy. Or one that uplifts, opens the heart, inspires and illuminates.To learn more about Sharon and Nurse SPARKS, go to: https://authenticmessengers.com/ Contact Name: Tami BlodgettContact Phone: 541-668-7526Contact E-mail: team@positivemediapress.com


News Article | June 23, 2017
Site: www.wineindustryadvisor.com

Project Born in Pendleton Can Revolutionize Harvest The Round-Up City is on the map as the birthplace for groundbreaking work in harvesting wine grapes and tree fruit… Gregory V. Jones Is Linfield College’s New Director of Wine Education Gregory V. Jones, known globally as one of the preeminent wine climatologists, has been named director of wine education at Linfield College… FDA Begins Winery Inspections Wine law specialists have warned since 2011 that the U.S. Food & Drug Administration would eventually start inspecting wineries for compliance with the Food Safety Modernization Act. This spring those inspections started in earnest… Trump and the Wine Industry The wine business is facing a number of issues that could be significantly impacted by Trump administration priorities, including climate change, reduction in scientific research and possible government overreach… Rosé Outpaces Overall Wine Category as Consumers ‘Drink Pink’ for Summer: Nielsen Bulk and Private Label Industry to Gather in San Francisco on July 26-27 Cooper’s Hawk to Move HQ to Woodridge, Produce More Wine Restaurants, Wineries and Prisons: the World of Frescobaldi Feature Your Job Listing in the Afternoon Brief Beyond TCA: New Cork Frontiers – What’s Next for Cork Research in a Post-TCA Era? June 30, 2017 – American Canyon, CA, United States Adult Beverage Retailers Need to Be Very Scared of the Amazon Purchase of Whole Foods Wineries Can’t Crank Up the Music for Free Jim Trezise Emphasizes U.S. Wine Industry’s Growing Need for National Representation Delicato’s Growing Presence in the Wine Industry – and Napa Valley Tips for Controlling Summer Weeds in the Vine Rows No Simple Solutions for Sonoma’s Glut of Downtown Wine-Tasting Rooms Why Blending Wine Is One of the Fastest Growing Trends in the Industry Here’s How Big Wine Gets to Avoid Environmental Rules in Napa


Ilundain-Agurruza J.,Linfield College
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences | Year: 2015

Excellent performance in sport involves specialized and refined skills within very narrow applications. Choking throws a wrench in the works of finely tuned performances. Functionally, and reduced to its simplest expression, choking is severe underperformance when engaging already mastered skills. Choking is a complex phenomenon with many intersecting facets: its dysfunctions result from the multifaceted interaction of cognitive and psychological processes, neurophysiological mechanisms, and phenomenological dynamics. This article develops a phenomenological model that, complementing empirical and theoretical research, helps understand and redress choking. It aims at describing the experience of choking as experience, and to discuss strategies to palliate or prevent its onset at the pragmatic level at which athletes engage the phenomenon experientially. An overview of current empirical research and theoretical models highlights key ideas and points out contentious issues. The model describes the common structure of the choking experience. It identifies four core constitutive elements: A) disruptive proprioceptive and kinesthetic dynamics, B) a malfunctioning background or Jamesian fringe of consciousness, C) dislocated time dynamics, and D) emotional disturbances. The novelty of the remedy is that it is designed to cross disciplinary boundaries between phenomenology, historiography, and hermeneutics, and moreover connects theory to praxis as it looks at Japanese dō (道), practices of self-cultivation. It focuses on actual do-or-die situations, not putative ones such as important business deals or competing for a medal. To this effect, it examines medieval Japanese swordsmanship and training manuals and also engages risk sports, where death is indeed a real possibility. The manuals, which arise in the context of choke-inducing life or death duels, and risk sports, afford keen phenomenological observations and practical advice that prove invaluable for today’s sports world and beyond. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: MAJOR RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION | Award Amount: 83.18K | Year: 2015

An award is made to Linfield College to support biochemical research with undergraduate students in the chemistry and biology departments with the acquisition of a fast purification liquid chromatography (FPLC) system. A research-grade FPLC system will support cross-disciplinary research and training for a diverse group of undergraduate students, especially in the research areas of mitochondrial transcription protein interactions and protein folding patterns. This cutting edge instrument will strengthen the already robust molecular and cellular biology facilities and encourage the recruitment and retention of high quality faculty teacher-scholars, including those from underrepresented groups. The FPLC instrument will also allow for the development of a research-intensive biochemistry course that has at its core fundamental research into the structure and function of proteins. Thus, acquisition of a FPLC system will allow the chemistry and biology departments to support the education and training of students from biology, chemistry, and biochemistry and molecular biology majors in courses and participate in independent research and summer research as part of Linfields Student-Faculty Collaborative Research Program.

This project has two research areas: 1) understanding regulatory mechanisms of mitochondrial transcription, and 2) investigating how distinct protein folding patterns may affect cellular function. Protein purification is essential to the methods of this project, and the FPLC system from this award will allow for the reproducible purification of the proteins of interest. Specifically, this includes mitochondrial proteins involved in transcription which are then used in an in vitro transcription assay, and conformational variants of the cortactin protein analyzed for functionality in an actin polymerization assay. Multiple methods of protein purification chromatography will be used including anion exchange chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, and metal ion affinity chromatography.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 648.56K | Year: 2016

This NSF Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) project will contribute to the national effort to produce more STEM graduates by establishing a cohort of 15 academically strong scholars with demonstrated financial need. The project will build on Linfield Colleges robust interdisciplinary STEM programs, which emphasize experiential learning through a student-centered approach. Scholars will participate in new and existing curricular and extracurricular programs along with the broader STEM student population. Such programs include (a) student-led learning communities organized around intellectual topics, (b) an interdisciplinary science and mathematics seminar, (c) career development, and (d) one-on-one student and faculty mentoring.

The theory of action for this project is based on research that shows that cultivating communities in which students connect to one another while engaging in science can foster their STEM identities and aid in their retention and persistence as STEM majors. Building upon the success of and expanding on a prior interdisciplinary initiative at Linfield, this project will support student collaboration on real-world problems that cross several disciplines through the science and mathematics seminar. The research team has developed a modified version of the Colorado Learning Attitudes in Science Survey to assess students beliefs about the nature of science and the way it is conducted, as well as their attitudes about their own abilities to learn science before and after this intervention. Student interest surveys, participation in project activities, and monitoring of student retention and graduation rates will be performed as part of formative and summative project evaluation. Results from the project will be disseminated via education journals such as the Journal of Higher Education and the Journal of Science Teaching and at national conferences sponsored by Mathematical Association of America, American Chemical Society, and Project Kaleidoscope.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: PROJECTS | Award Amount: 49.79K | Year: 2015

Industrial agriculture is heavily dependent on affordable fossil fuels to power every step of the food supply chain - to move water, produce and apply critical inputs (fertilizer, pesticides), cultivate, harvest, process and distribute food and fiber from a diverse array of crops, and finally to power all the steps around preparing and consuming these materials and manageing the resultant waste streams. However, a transition from fossil fuels to other energy sources (e.g. biofuels, solar) may be needed to modify key drivers of climate change. This transition may have serious implications for net energy availability in food-energy-water (FEW) systems. Net energy is the energy that remains after the energy costs of procuring and processing or refining an energy resource are subtracted. There has been insufficient attention to the potentially enormous implications for society of a decline in the net energy available to power systems within the FEW nexus. Additionally, while there may be substitutes for energy-dense fossil fuels, substitutes for water do not exist. Since FEW economic development strategies hinge on water availability, a key focus of research ahead will need to be aimed at understanding how net energy decline may impact water needs in industrial agriculture, especially in the U.S. Effective measures to address these bottlenecks in and enhance sustainability of FEW systems will need to link larger social, political, and economic processes with net energy realities. There is great need to bring social, behavioral, and economic disciplines squarely into research on net energy implications for the FEW system.

Linfield College will host a two and half day conference to examine net energy challenges facing FEW systems and the social, political, and economic dimensions of net energy in the context of FEW systems. Specifically, this workshop will discuss two key elements of the FEW nexus: 1) implications of trends in the net energy available to power food and water systems, and 2) societal challenges stemming from declining net energy working through food systems. This workshop will also identify gaps in current FEW system knowledge, particularly those that emerge from systemic and exogenous factors relating to declining net energy. Workshop participants will include scientists with net energy and complex systems expertise drawn from the social and physical sciences, including: economists, anthropologists, sociologists, political scientists, physicists, chemists, and engineers. This workshop will also include practitioners with applied FEW nexus experience from the US and other countries.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SYMBIOSIS DEF & SELF RECOG | Award Amount: 128.42K | Year: 2016

Intracellular associations between animal hosts and algal symbionts support important ecosystems like coral reefs. Despite the importance of these associations, there is limited understanding of basic aspects about how stable interactions between host and algal partners is achieved. This inhibits our ability to make informed decisions about the management of vulnerable ecosystems. For example, coral reefs experience periodic bleaching events that involve the breakdown of the symbiosis and jeopardize reef health, but the process of bleaching and subsequent recovery of the host are poorly understood. To protect our valuable reef resources, greater understanding of the cellular and genetic cross-talk between symbiotic partners is required. This project will elucidate key components of the conserved genetic regulatory pathways important in host:symbiont exchanges. As changes to ocean environments occur (e.g., increasing average seawater temperatures), it is imperative that details about how hosts support symbiont populations at the cellular and genetic level are fully understood. The project has a diverse suite of planned broader impacts including training of STEM undergraduates, involvement in a pre-college summer bridge program to increase diversity in STEM, partnerships with national leaders in incorporating undergraduate research in community colleges, and high impact community based learning opportunities.

The research will refine understanding of host:symbiont interactions through identification of major-effect symbiosis genes and genetic pathways. The proposed work takes advantage of unique properties of marine and freshwater sponge hosts and their algal partners to identify the molecular, genetic, cellular, and physiological interactions that occur. These properties allow control over the timing of symbiont infection, so that gene expression profiles can be correlated with events involved with symbiont contact, engulfment, recognition, intracellular migration, and repopulation. In a methodologically novel way, the research will create different combinations of hosts and algal partners to explore reasons why particular hosts become suitable habitat for particular symbionts while other hosts cannot support those symbionts. The project will explore how down-regulating gene expression can change dynamics of host:symbiont interactions, and combining field-based experiments, RNAseq, and advanced physiological, microscopic, and molecular tools, the research will identify common regulatory features of those interactions. The results will increase understanding of the habitat requirements of the symbiont, and the ability of the hosts to interact with different partners. The results will also help define the scope of change in the identity of symbiotic partners. In addition to intellectual contributions in the form of publications and presentations, this project will expand educational and research opportunities for pre-college, community college, and undergraduate students, particularly those from underserved backgrounds. The proposal will support high impact practices like course-based research and community-based learning in the context of an undergraduate curriculum, as well as community outreach through a multi-disciplinary faculty learning community and civic-engaged talks.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: MAJOR RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION | Award Amount: 223.18K | Year: 2012

Linfield College requests funding to purchase a Zeiss AxioObserver Z1 inverted fluorescence microscope system. The system enables DIC, phase, and fluorescence microscopy, and includes a motorized body for automated analysis in the x, y, and z planes, an environmental chamber system, and a micro-injection system. This microscope system will be used to enhance the research programs of faculty within the Biology department as well as to enhance the training of undergraduate researchers in the college. The research projects that will be enabled with this instrument include 1.) Deciphering molecular mechanisms of microRNA activity in vivo and determining the roles of specific microRNAs during animal development, 2.) Determining the role of phosphoregulation of proteins in regulating cellular motility in human and Dictyostelium models, and 3) Investigating the role of sponges and sponge-associated bacterial communities on nutrient fluxes in estuarine habitats. Undergraduate students participating in research projects in faculty laboratories and through curriculum-based research projects will use the microscope system to acquire high resolution images of mammalian cells, analysis of GFP reporters and immunofluorescence in Drosophila tissues and cell culture, and fluorescent in situ hybridization assays of bacterial symbionts in sponge. Undergraduates trained on this instrument will include a range of introductory through senior level students, and it is anticipated that research training incorporating this instrument will further enhance students productivity and acceptance into graduate programs.

In the past six years, the Biology Department at Linfield College has undergone a significant period of growth, due to retirements and addition of new faculty lines, resulting in the hiring of five new faculty members. Among these new faculty hires are three faculty whose research includes various applications of fluorescence microscopy. In order to facilitate their research, to increase the productivity of all faculty, and to improve the research experience of undergraduate students in this program, Linfield College requests funds to purchase a Zeiss AxioObserver Z1 Microscope System that will enable faculty and students to generate publication quality images using its fluorescence, DIC, and phase contrast capabilities. The goals in acquiring this instrument are to 1) enable faculty members to collect high quality data, publish their results, and increase competitiveness for future external federal funding to support research programs; 2) enhance the departments work that integrates education and research by providing students with research grade equipment to perform high resolution, quantitative analyses of cells and; 3) provide outstanding research training facilities for undergraduate students in preparation for future research and medically related careers in the biological sciences. The department?s integration of research and education leads to research publications and presentations at national meetings as well as an excellent success rate for students applying to and succeeding in graduate and professional programs at the national level. Approximately 40% of the graduates from the department in the past five years have continued on to graduate or professional programs, and the trend in this pattern is increasing as new faculty establish and maintain their research programs.

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