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News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Baltimore biotech firm, PathSensors, announced that its CEO, Ted Olsen, joined with other leaders of the Maryland Biohealth community in developing and issuing recommendations to grow Maryland's biohealth industry and position the state as a globally recognized Top 3 U.S. BioHealth Innovation Hub by 2023. The recommendations are contained in a report from the Maryland Life Sciences Advisory Board (LSAB). The report made recommendations around four key areas: assets, connectivity, capital and talent, or ACCT Now. “I’m honored to have the opportunity to serve on the LSAB,” Mr. Olsen commented. “PathSensor’s has benefited greatly from the wonderful resources and people in Maryland’s biotech community.” Mr. Olsen was appointed to the LSAB in 2016 by Governor Hogan, and serves alongside distinguished members including Maryland Commerce Secretary Mike Gill, John Wasilisin, president and COO of the Maryland Technology Development Corp. (TEDCO), University of Maryland, Baltimore President Dr. Jay A. Perman, and Dr. Christopher P. Austin, director of the National Center for Advancing Translational Studies at NIH. For more information about the LSAB and to read the full report, click here. About PathSensors, Inc. PathSensors is a leading biotechnology solutions and environmental testing company. aPathSensors provides high speed, highly sensitive pathogen and threat detection solutions for the defense, homeland security, public health, medical countermeasures, mail room screening, first responder, food processing and agricultural sectors. PathSensors’ innovative BioFlash and Zephyr detection systems use CANARY® technology licensed from the MIT-Lincoln Laboratory and are deployed by government and commercial agencies due to their speed, accuracy and ease-of-use. For more information, visit http://www.pathsensors.com. For more information, please visit http://www.PathSensors.com, call 443.557.6150 or email info(at)PathSensors(dot)com.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Onyx Renewable Partners L.P. ("Onyx"), in conjunction with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ("MIT") Lincoln Laboratory, has successfully implemented an 820 kWDC photovoltaic (PV) carport at the Laboratory in Lexington, Massachusetts.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.63K | Year: 2014

To achieve the goals of this program improving spectral coverage and output power of monolithic QCL sources as well as the development of a production and manufacturing plan - we propose to develop in collaboration with MIT Lincoln Laboratory a broadly tunable high power source that is based on Eos"proprietary QCL array technology. The current generation of Eos"commercially available fully packaged QCLAs ("The Matchbox") can be tuned over a wavelength range of up to 200 cm-1. The development of the proposed next generation QCLA source with increased power level and spectral breadth will strongly benefit from Eos"s unique expertise and experience in design and fabrication of monolithic QCL sources.


Aguilar C.A.,Lincoln Laboratory | Craighead H.G.,Cornell University
Nature Nanotechnology | Year: 2013

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the blueprint on which life is based and transmitted, but the way in which chromatin-a dynamic complex of nucleic acids and proteins-is packaged and behaves in the cellular nucleus has only begun to be investigated. Epigenetic modifications sit 'on top of' the genome and affect how DNA is compacted into chromatin and transcribed into ribonucleic acid (RNA). The packaging and modifications around the genome have been shown to exert significant influence on cellular behaviour and, in turn, human development and disease. However, conventional techniques for studying epigenetic or conformational modifications of chromosomes have inherent limitations and, therefore, new methods based on micro- and nanoscale devices have been sought. Here, we review the development of these devices and explore their use in the study of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications and higher-order chromatin structures. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2014

HYPRES, in collaboration with MIT Lincoln Laboratory and ISQC, proposes to transition superconducting parametric amplifier technology into a robust line of products. In Phase I, we will develop three varieties of superconducting low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) in compact cryogenic microwave packages. These are two types of standing wave devices, lumped-element Josephson parametric amplifier (LJPA) and Josephson parametric converter (JPC), and a traveling wave parametric amplifier (TWPA). To address the primary application of real-time measurements of quantum circuits, the LNAs will be experimentally evaluated, characterized and demonstrated by integrating with quantum bits for their readout. Our plan is to expand the single-channel amplifier product to accommodate the growing complexity of quantum computing and cryogenic detector systems in Phase II. Working towards this goal, we will experimentally perform direct digitization of the LNA output at 4K in Phase I itself with existing superconductor analog-to-digital converter (ADC) chips, and evaluate sensitivity and bandwidth trade-offs. This will be accomplished by leveraging the complete digital data acquisition and processing infrastructure from HYPRES"cryocooled digital-RF receiver product. These data will be used to design an optimized product, enabling simultaneous multiplexed readout of multiple weak analog signals originating at cryogenic temperatures.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.57K | Year: 2015

The proposed work seeks to establish electric field sensor performance goals and study state of the art electro-optic and nitrogen vacancy diamond electric field sensors.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 893.86K | Year: 2014

We propose to combine QmagiQ's strained layer superlattice (SLS) sensor technology with MIT Lincoln Laboratory's novel digital pixel readout integrated circuit (DROIC) to realize an advanced longwave infrared digital focal plane array (DFPA) with high quantum efficiency, dynamic range, and operating temperature. In Phase I, we developed the basic SLS DFPA and demonstrated its extraordinarily high signal-to-noise. In Phase II, we will optimize the DFPA, integrate it into a full-fledged surveillance system, and test it in the field. It's field performance will be directly compared to an identical system with a mercury cadmium telluride FPA.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 528.65K | Year: 2015

QmagiQ and MIT-LL will partner to develop a high-performance very longwave infrared digital focal plane array (VLWIR DFPA) suitable for hyperspectral imaging applications. The DFPA will be based on Type-II antimony-based strained layer superlattice (SLS) photodiodes with > 13 micron cutoff, hybridized to a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC). In Phase I, we investigated the performance of a set of SLS FPAs with the cutoff wavelength systematically shifted from ~ 10 microns to ~ 16 microns. In Phase II, we will build on this effort to maximize quantum efficiency at the longest wavelengths and exploit the DROIC's unique ability to handle large dark current while delivering great signal-to-noise. The resulting sensor will be particularly useful in an infrared hyperspectral imaging system for the stand-off detection of homemade explosives.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 300.00K | Year: 2015

Freedom Photonics is proposing to develop a novel modulator concept. The overall objective of this program is to develop a novel compound-semiconductor electro-optic modulator that simultaneously exhibits 100-GHz operation, optical/microwave velocity matc


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 499.61K | Year: 2015

Air-Borne Sense and Avoid (ABSAA) cooperative sensors like TCAS and ADS-B are non-developmental off-the-shelf items and as such their employment should be optimized to maximize their effect on levels of safety. The radar subsystem is a new construct whose role and employment has not been previously defined. In addition, the cost of the radar development and production costs are high and dependent on its assigned role and the associated performance requirements. As such a complete assessment of the Size Weight and Power (SWaP) and costs must be included in the establishment of safety requirements. Currently, the Navy is formulating the traceability between Air-Borne Sense and Avoid (ABSAA) radar subsystem and system requirements for UAS platforms including Triton and Fire Scout. This STTR builds on and is coordinated with that effort but focuses on a specific radar ABSAA subsystem, the Common Radar Automatic Collision Avoidance System (C-RACAS) in order to support its development schedule. C-RACAS is targeted for both the Fire Scout and Triton platforms.

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