Lilly UK

Windlesham, United Kingdom
Windlesham, United Kingdom

Time filter

Source Type

Combatting Opioid Addiction: Janssen, Cara Therapeutics, Nektar, Pharmaleads and Centrexion Meet to Discuss Developments in Safe Pain Management Industry Set to Gather for 17th Annual Pain Therapeutics Summit to Combat Opioid Addiction and Access New Innovations in Safe Pain Management London, United Kingdom, May 05, 2017 --( Drawing insight from clinical results, industry case studies and scientific updates, agenda highlights will include: 1. Opening address from Janssen discussing conflicts surrounding pain research, economic value, using compounds and opioid addiction 2. Cara Therapeutics present clinical trial data on a novel peripherally acting kappa opioid receptor agonist that is currently in Phase 3 trials for post-operative pain (IV) and in Phase 2 trials for chronic pain (oral) 3. Nektar provide a clinical analysis looking at human abuse liability of a novel opioid agonist with inherently slow CNS entry 4. Pharmaleads present results of the first Dual ENKephalinase Inhibitors (DENKIs) to reach the clinic 5. An update on clinical candidates for migraine pain which have demonstrated clinical efficacy in a keynote by MSD USA on CGRP receptor antagonists 6. Centrexion Therapeutics case study on non-opioid analgesics in Morton’s Neuroma and Knee Osteoarthritis 7. Results from a CHDR study using a multimodal pain test battery 8. A spotlight on animal models featuring talks on translational pain research from Neurodigm, MD Biosciences, Zoetis and Grunenthal GmbH 9. Patient stratification based on somatosensory phenotyping - Mundipharma discuss implications for mechanism-based pain treatment and drug development 10. University of Manchester provide academic insight into brain mechanisms of vulnerability and resilience to pain 11. Lilly UK discuss how to improve the translatability of neurophysiological pharmacodynamic biomarkers in pain pathways 12. Insight into exploiting synergy in the neurotrophin pathway to provide analgesia presented by AstraZeneca 13. Novartis provide guidance on using patient reported outcome measures (proms) in patient management and pain clinical trials 14. Direction on using potassium channels as pain and migraine targets by Amgen 15. Ipsen Innovation explore the biology of botulinum neurotoxin for treatment of chronic pain 16. Grunenthal Sweden provide a progressive outlook on patient drug development A detailed conference agenda and full speaker line-up is available at http://www.pain-therapeutics.co.uk A series of interviews with key speakers are also available to read in the event download centre at: http://www.smi-online.co.uk/goto/2017pain-therapeutics.asp#tab_downloads Pain Therapeutics 2017 22nd & 23rd May Copthorne Tara Hotel, London, UK Contact Information: For media enquiries contact Teri Arri on Tel: +44 (0)20 7827 6162 / Email: tarri@smi-online.co.uk About SMi Group: Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk London, United Kingdom, May 05, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Just under 3 weeks remain until the industry gathers to assess the latest developments and innovations in effective and safe pain management at SMi’s 17th annual conference on Pain Therapeutics.Drawing insight from clinical results, industry case studies and scientific updates, agenda highlights will include:1. Opening address from Janssen discussing conflicts surrounding pain research, economic value, using compounds and opioid addiction2. Cara Therapeutics present clinical trial data on a novel peripherally acting kappa opioid receptor agonist that is currently in Phase 3 trials for post-operative pain (IV) and in Phase 2 trials for chronic pain (oral)3. Nektar provide a clinical analysis looking at human abuse liability of a novel opioid agonist with inherently slow CNS entry4. Pharmaleads present results of the first Dual ENKephalinase Inhibitors (DENKIs) to reach the clinic5. An update on clinical candidates for migraine pain which have demonstrated clinical efficacy in a keynote by MSD USA on CGRP receptor antagonists6. Centrexion Therapeutics case study on non-opioid analgesics in Morton’s Neuroma and Knee Osteoarthritis7. Results from a CHDR study using a multimodal pain test battery8. A spotlight on animal models featuring talks on translational pain research from Neurodigm, MD Biosciences, Zoetis and Grunenthal GmbH9. Patient stratification based on somatosensory phenotyping - Mundipharma discuss implications for mechanism-based pain treatment and drug development10. University of Manchester provide academic insight into brain mechanisms of vulnerability and resilience to pain11. Lilly UK discuss how to improve the translatability of neurophysiological pharmacodynamic biomarkers in pain pathways12. Insight into exploiting synergy in the neurotrophin pathway to provide analgesia presented by AstraZeneca13. Novartis provide guidance on using patient reported outcome measures (proms) in patient management and pain clinical trials14. Direction on using potassium channels as pain and migraine targets by Amgen15. Ipsen Innovation explore the biology of botulinum neurotoxin for treatment of chronic pain16. Grunenthal Sweden provide a progressive outlook on patient drug developmentA detailed conference agenda and full speaker line-up is available at http://www.pain-therapeutics.co.ukA series of interviews with key speakers are also available to read in the event download centre at: http://www.smi-online.co.uk/goto/2017pain-therapeutics.asp#tab_downloadsPain Therapeutics 201722nd & 23rd MayCopthorne Tara Hotel, London, UKContact Information:For media enquiries contact Teri Arri on Tel: +44 (0)20 7827 6162 / Email: tarri@smi-online.co.ukAbout SMi Group:Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from SMi Group


News Article | June 19, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

The 'Behind the Smile' film is launched to coincide with the results from the new survey by Lilly, RA Matters, which reveals a lack of understanding about the true impact of RA. The survey uncovered that many people with RA don't feel the emotional (60%)[1] or the physical (49%)[1] impact of the disease is understood by those around them. To view the 'Behind the Smile' film, please visit http://www.nras.org.uk/behindthesmile. "This short film aims to illustrate what goes on 'behind the smile' for someone with RA and what they truly may be thinking or feeling beneath the outward appearance of coping," said Clare Jacklin, Director of External Affairs, National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society (NRAS), UK. "The film aims to encourage those with RA to open up to those around them including family and work colleagues as well as importantly to have an honest conversation with their doctor or nurse about how the disease truly impacts their everyday life so they [the health professionals] can help provide the best care. The film also holds an important message for the health professionals that while clinic appointments are tight on time and they may have their own targets to meet, prioritising what "matters" to the patient can lead to a far better long-term outcome than just managing the symptoms of the disease. Treat the person not the disease!" Using traditional and social media platforms to recruit respondents, 1,250 people with RA and 65 healthcare professionals were surveyed in the UK to identify what matters most to people with RA in terms of activities, work, personal relationships and aspirations[1]. The survey revealed: "RA Awareness Week aims to help people understand what it's really like to live with rheumatoid arthritis," said Dr. Greg van Wyk, Senior Medical Director, Lilly UK. "The RA Matters survey revealed that our lack of understanding of the physical and emotional impact of RA and how it makes people with RA feel still remains a barrier to improving the lives of those living with this disease. At Lilly we want to understand and listen to the challenges that face people living with RA and we are committed to working in partnership with the rheumatology community to help people better manage their disease." Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterised by inflammation and progressive destruction of joints.[2] More than 23 million people worldwide suffer from RA.[3] Approximately three times as many women as men have the disease.[4] 6,208 people participated in the RA Matters survey, of which 5,400 were people who had been diagnosed with RA, and 808 were rheumatologists or healthcare professionals (HCPs) that treat RA. The survey was carried out between November 4, 2016 and February 13, 2017, from eight participating countries (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom). The RA Matters survey set out to fill a gap in the existing RA evidence base. The over-arching objective of the survey was to demonstrate the real unmet need in RA. Specifically the survey explored the outcomes and quality of life related areas that are most important, relevant and impactful of patients' lives.[1] Using an innovative visual data collection method on a live web platform, the RA Matters survey allowed people to see and compare their results in real time - helping us to bring important RA stories to life. For more information on the RA Matters survey and to explore the findings, please visit http://www.ramatters.eu/en_GB. The RA Matters survey was supported and/or informed by the following individuals and organisations: The National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society (NRAS) is the only patient-led voluntary organisation focusing specifically on Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). It has become established as the voice in the UK for people with RA and JIA - providing a total network of support, information and advocacy for those affected, their carers and families. NRAS (http://www.nras.org.uk ) was founded in 2001 by Ailsa Bosworth - with the support of rheumatologists and fellow RA sufferers - after a long battle through her own diagnosis of RA. NRAS' mission is to help those with RA or JIA to live life to the full by: Lilly is a global healthcare leader that unites caring with discovery to make life better for people around the world. We were founded more than a century ago by a man committed to creating high-quality medicines that meet real needs, and today we remain true to that mission in all our work. Across the globe, Lilly employees work to discover and bring life-changing medicines to those who need them, improve the understanding and management of disease, and give back to communities through philanthropy and volunteerism. Lilly has been operating in the UK since 1934 and employs approximately 2,500 people throughout the country working in sales and marketing, research and development and bio-tech manufacturing. Lilly's research priorities are aligned with significant UK health needs including diabetes, heart disease, mental health and cancer. To learn more about Lilly, please visit us at http://www.lilly.co.uk This press release contains forward-looking statements (as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995) about Lilly's product pipeline and reflects Lilly's current beliefs. However, there are substantial risks and uncertainties in the process of pharmaceutical research, development, and commercialization. For further discussion of these and other risks and uncertainties, see Lilly's most recent 10-K and 10-Q filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as may be required by law, Lilly undertakes no duty to update forward-looking statements for events occurring after the date of this release. 2. Kahlenberg J and Fox D. Advances in the Medical Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis. Hand Clinics 2011 February ; 27(1): 11-20. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3135413/pdf/nihms305780.pdf (Accessed: May 25, 2017). 3. World Health Organisation (WHO). The Global Burden of Disease Report, (table 7, page 32) 2004, http://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_burden_disease/GBD_report_2004update_full.pdf (Accessed: May 25, 2017). 4. Arthritis Foundation. What is Rheumatoid Arthritis? http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/rheumatoid-arthritis/what-is-rheumatoid-arthritis.php   (Accessed: May 25, 2017)


Blak B.T.,Cegedim Strategic Data Medical Research Ltd. | Smith H.T.,Lilly UK | Hards M.,Cegedim Strategic Data Medical Research Ltd. | Curtis B.H.,Lilly United States | Ivanyi T.,Lilly Hungary
Diabetic Medicine | Year: 2012

Aims To describe patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with basal insulin, with or without oral antidiabetics in UK primary care, and evaluate insulin treatment patterns and factors explaining changes in therapy. Methods Retrospective analysis of patients with Type 2 diabetes within The Health Improvement Network UK primary care database. Patients receiving basal insulin between January and June 2006 were followed until July 2009. Results Analysis included 3185 patients, mean age 65.6years [standard deviation (SD) 12.4], 50.9% men, median diabetes duration 9.6years, median basal insulin use 1.3years, 86.5% had received oral antidiabetics in the previous 12months. Mean follow-up was 2.9years (SD 1.0), 59.8% patients maintained basal insulin throughout follow-up with a mean HbA1C of 69mmol/mol (SD 19; 8.4%, SD 1.7) at baseline and 65mmol/mol (SD 17; 8.1%, SD 1.6) during follow-up. During follow-up, 6.9% of patients discontinued, 19.3% intensified with and 14.1% switched to prandial or premixed insulin. Patients who intensified (prandial) had a mean HbA1c of 77mmol/mol (SD 18; 9.2%, SD 1.6) before change and a mean HbA1c of 71mmol/mol (SD 21; 8.6%, SD 2.0) at the end of the study. Those switching to premixed insulin had a mean HbA1c of 80mmol/mol (SD 18; 9.5%, SD 1.7) before change and a mean HbA1c of 69mmol/mol (SD 17; 8.5%, SD 1.5) at the end of the study. Increasing HbA1c and longer diabetes duration explained intensification and switch. Conclusions The majority of patients had HbA1c above the 53mmol/mol (<7%) target at baseline and post-intensification/switch. The HbA1c levels were reduced by intensification/switch suggesting that insulin changes did have some impact. Most patients did not change insulin treatment despite having higher than recommended HbA1c levels. Reasons for not changing treatment in face of unsatisfactory clinical outcomes are unclear. Further research is warranted to explore barriers towards therapy change. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.


Cellek S.,Cranfield University | Cameron N.E.,University of Aberdeen | Cotter M.A.,University of Aberdeen | Fry C.H.,University of Bristol | Ilo D.,Lilly UK
Nature Reviews Urology | Year: 2014

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-related lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and erectile dysfunction commonly coexist, and both respond to phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5 inhibitors, suggesting a shared pathophysiological mechanism. We propose that both BPH-LUTS and erectile dysfunction are caused by microvascular dysfunction within the pelvic organs, and we present an overview of preclinical and clinical studies supporting the hypothesis that, within both the penis and the lower urinary tract, a combination of endothelial and neural dysfunction leads to a vicious cycle of hypoxia, vasoconstriction, altered smooth muscle contractility, and degeneration of autonomic neurons and ganglia. This hypothesis explains much of the preclinical and clinical research relating to these two conditions, and provides a rationale for further investigation into the effects of PDE5 inhibitors on the pathophysiology and symptoms of BPH-LUTS. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Mancini M.,Eli Lilly and Company | Wade A.G.,CPS Research | Perugi G.,University of Pisa | Lenox-Smith A.,Lilly UK | Schacht A.,Lilly Deutschland GmbH
Journal of Psychiatric Research | Year: 2014

An increasing rate of antidepressant trials fail due to large placebo responses. This analysis aimed to identify variables influencing signal detection in clinical trials of major depressive disorder. Patient-level data of randomized patients with a duloxetine dose ≥60mg/day were obtained from Lilly. Total scores of the Hamilton Depression Rating scale (HAM-D) were used as efficacy endpoints. In total, 4661 patients from 14 studies were included in the analysis. The overall effect size (ES), based on the HAM-D total score at endpoint, between duloxetine and placebo was-0.272. Although no statistically significant interactions were found, the following results for factors influencing ES were seen: a very low ES (-0.157) in patients in the lowest baseline HAM-D category and in patients recruited in the last category of the recruitment period (-0.122). A higher ES in patients recruited in centers with a site-size at but not more than 2.5 times the average site-size for the study (-0.345). Study characteristics that resulted in low signal detection in our database were: <80% study completers, a HAM-D placebo response >5 points, a high variability of placebo response (SD>7 points HAM-D), >6 post baseline visits per study, and use of an active control drug. Simpler trial designs, more homogeneous and mid-sized study sites, a primary analysis based on a higher cutoff blinded to investigators to avoid the influence of score inflation in mild patients and, if possible, studies without an active control group could lead to a better signal detection of antidepressive efficacy. © 2014 The Authors.


Blak B.T.,Cegedim Strategic Data Medical Research Ltd. | Smith H.T.,Lilly UK | Hards M.,Cegedim Strategic Data Medical Research Ltd. | Maguire A.,United Biosource Corporation | Gimeno V.,Lundbeck
Diabetic Medicine | Year: 2012

Diabet. Med. 29, e191-e198 (2012) Aims This study characterized UK primary care patients with Type 2 diabetes who initiated insulin treatment, and described the initial insulin regimens used, overall metabolic changes and health-care resource usage. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed using quality-checked patient data from The Health Improvement Network database. Eligible patients who initiated insulin for the first time between 2004 and 2006 were grouped into four cohorts according to the type of insulin regimen initiated. Data on patient characteristics, metabolic and clinical outcomes and health-care resource use were collected at baseline and during 6months of follow-up. Results In total, 4045 eligible adults [2269 male, 1776 female; mean age 62.6±13.3years; mean baseline HbA 1c 82±22mmol/mol (9.6%±2.0%)] initiated insulin. Approximately half (52.4%) initiated insulin as basal insulin only, 41.6% as premixed only, 4.0% as basal-bolus and 2.1% as prandial insulin only. Among patients with ≥180days follow-up (n=3815), the initial insulin regimen was not changed during follow-up in 75.1% of patients, while 13.7% discontinued, 7.0% switched and 4.7% intensified insulin therapy. The mean change in HbA 1c was -14mmol/mol (-1.3%, n=2881), with 17.3% of patients achieving an HbA 1c of <53mmol/mol (7%, n=3024). The mean weight change was +0.9kg (n=2345). Conclusions Basal and premixed insulin were the most common types of insulin initiated and in most patients no changes were made to the initial regimen over 6months. However, few patients achieved glycemic control targets. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

Loading Lilly UK collaborators
Loading Lilly UK collaborators