Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Fagerli K.M.,Deprtment of Rheumatology | Lie E.,Deprtment of Rheumatology | Van Der Heijde D.,Deprtment of Rheumatology | Van Der Heijde D.,Leiden University | And 6 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2013

Background: Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) are efficacious in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), but some patients do not respond or do not tolerate their first TNFi, and are switched to a different TNFi. Evidence supporting this practice is limited, and we wanted to investigate the effectiveness of switching to a second TNFi. Material and methods: From a longitudinal observational study (LOS) we selected patients with PsA who were starting their first TNFi, and identified patients who had switched to a second TNFi ('switchers'). Three-month responses and 3-year drug-survival were compared between switchers and non-switchers, and within switchers. Results: Switchers (n=95) receiving their second TNFi had significantly poorer responses compared with non-switchers (n=344) (ACR50 response: 22.5% vs 40.0%, DAS28 remission: 28.2% vs 54.1%). There was a trend towards poorer responses to the second TNFi compared with the first TNFi within switchers. Estimated 3-year drug-survival was 36% for the second TNFi compared with 57% for the first TNFi overall. Conclusions: 20-40% of patients had a response on a second TNFi after having failed one TNFi in this LOS. This observation highlights the need for treatments with other mechanisms of action than TNF inhibition in patients with PsA.


Grundtman C.,Karolinska Institutet | Grundtman C.,Innsbruck Medical University | Hollan I.,Lillehammer Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases | Forre O.T.,University of Oslo | And 3 more authors.
Arthritis and Rheumatism | Year: 2010

Objective. Various inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRDs) are associated with increased mortality due to cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate heart biopsy specimens obtained from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting and compare markers of inflammation and endothelial cell activation in the cardiac and skeletal muscle of patients with and those without IRD. Methods. Paired biopsy specimens of cardiac and skeletal muscle were obtained from 22 consecutive patients with IRD and 8 patients without IRD, all of whom were undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The biopsy specimens were evaluated in a blinded manner by conventional microscopy and digital image analysis for cell markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68, CD163, and CD31), HLA (HLA-ABC, HLA-DR, and HLA-DQ), adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1), and proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1α, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor). Results. Patients with IRD had significantly higher expression of adhesion molecules, proinflammatory cytokines, and all classes of HLA on cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells but no increase on mononuclear cells in the myocardium compared with patients without IRD. Furthermore, cardiac muscle from patients with IRD displayed significantly higher local expression of inflammation and activation of cardiac microvessels compared with skeletal muscle from the same patients. Conclusion. Patients with cardiovascular disease had increased expression of adhesion molecules, HLA, and proinflammatory cytokines in heart tissue, indicating local inflammation involving microvessels and cardiomyocytes that could play a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. The more pronounced changes in patients with IRD compared with patients without IRD might contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease and premature death in patients with IRD. © 2010, American College of Rheumatology.


Wallenius M.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Skomsvoll J.F.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Irgens L.M.,Norwegian Institute of Public Health | Salvesen K.A.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | And 5 more authors.
Arthritis and Rheumatism | Year: 2011

Objective To examine possible associations between chronic inflammatory arthritides and pregnancy outcomes with separate analyses of first and subsequent births before and after diagnosis. Methods Linkage of data from a registry of patients with chronic inflammatory arthritides and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway enabled a comparison of pregnancy outcomes in women with chronic inflammatory arthritides and pregnancy outcomes in reference subjects. Outcomes of first birth and subsequent births before and after diagnosis were analyzed separately. Associations between chronic inflammatory arthritides and the women's health during pregnancy and delivery as well as perinatal outcomes were assessed in logistic regression analyses with adjustments for maternal age at delivery and gestational age. Results We analyzed 128 first births and 151 subsequent births after diagnosis and 286 first births and 262 subsequent births before diagnosis in patients and compared them with first and subsequent births in reference subjects. Firstborn children of women diagnosed as having chronic inflammatory arthritides were more often preterm (odds ratio [OR] 1.85 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.09-3.13]) and small for gestational age (OR 1.60 [95% CI 1.00-2.56]). They also had lower mean birth weight (P = 0.01) and higher perinatal mortality (OR 3.26 [95% CI 1.04-10.24]). Birth by caesarean section (all classifications) was more frequent in patients than in reference subjects, and elective caesarean section was 2-fold more frequent in patients, both in first birth (OR 2.60 [95% CI 1.43-4.75]) and in subsequent births (OR 2.18 [95% CI 1.33-3.58]). No excess risks of clinical importance were observed prior to diagnosis of chronic inflammatory arthritides. Conclusion Excess risks were related to first birth in women diagnosed as having chronic inflammatory arthritides, including a higher rate of perinatal mortality. A higher caesarean section rate was related to all patient deliveries. Mainly, pregnancy outcomes before diagnosis did not differ from those in reference subjects. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.


Wallenius M.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Skomsvoll J.F.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Irgens L.M.,Norwegian Institute of Public Health | Salvesen K.A.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | And 4 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2010

Background: It is known that onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is increased post partum. Objective: To compare incidence rates between RA and other chronic arthritides (OCA) 0-24 months after delivery, and to compare the incidence rates within each group 0-24 versus 25-48 months post partum. Methods: Premenopausal women from a Norwegian patient register were linked with the Medical Birth Registry of Norway to study the interval between delivery and time of diagnosis. Cox regression analysis with adjustments for age at delivery and birth order was applied to compare proportions of incident cases of RA and OCA with onset 0-24 months post partum. Poisson regression analysis with adjustment for the population at risk was applied to estimate the incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0-24 versus 25-48 months post partum. Results: Of 183 RA and 110 patients with OCA diagnosed after delivery, 69 (37.7%) had RA and 31 (28.2%) OCA during the first 24 months post partum (p=0.09). The IRR (95% CI) for diagnosis during 0-24 months versus 25-48 months was 1.73 (1.11 to 2.70) (p=0.01) for RA, 1.05 (0.59 to 1.84) (p=0.86) for OCA. The IRR was 2.23 (1.06 to 4.70) and 1.87 (0.67 to 5.21), respectively, when only considering diagnoses after the first pregnancy. Clinical characteristics were similar within each diagnostic group. Conclusion: The proportions of incident cases with onset 0-24 months after delivery were not different between RA and OCA. A peak in incidence during 0-24 months was seen in the RA group, both when considering all pregnancies and only the first pregnancy.


Hollan I.,Lillehammer Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases | Dessein P.H.,University of Witwatersrand | Ronda N.,University of Parma | Wasko M.C.,West Penn Hospital Allegheny Health Network | And 8 more authors.
Autoimmunity Reviews | Year: 2015

The increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been recognized for many years. However, although the characteristics of CVD and its burden resemble those in diabetes, the focus on cardiovascular (CV) prevention in RA has lagged behind, both in the clinical and research settings. Similar to diabetes, the clinical picture of CVD in RA may be atypical, even asymptomatic. Therefore, a proactive screening for subclinical CVD in RA is warranted. Because of the lack of clinical trials, the ideal CVD prevention (CVP) in RA has not yet been defined. In this article, we focus on challenges and controversies in the CVP in RA (such as thresholds for statin therapy), and propose recommendations based on the current evidence. Due to the significant contribution of non-traditional, RA-related CV risk factors, the CV risk calculators developed for the general population underestimate the true risk in RA. Thus, there is an enormous need to develop adequate CV risk stratification tools and to identify the optimal CVP strategies in RA. While awaiting results from randomized controlled trials in RA, clinicians are largely dependent on the use of common sense, and extrapolation of data from studies on other patient populations. The CVP in RA should be based on an individualized evaluation of a broad spectrum of risk factors, and include: 1) reduction of inflammation, preferably with drugs decreasing CV risk, 2) management of factors associated with increased CV risk (e.g., smoking, hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, kidney disease, depression, periodontitis, hypothyroidism, vitamin D deficiency and sleep apnea), and promotion of healthy life style (smoking cessation, healthy diet, adjusted physical activity, stress management, weight control), 3) aspirin and influenza and pneumococcus vaccines according to current guidelines, and 4) limiting use of drugs that increase CV risk. Rheumatologists should take responsibility for the education of health care providers and RA patients regarding CVP in RA. It is immensely important to incorporate CV outcomes in testing of anti-rheumatic drugs. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

Discover hidden collaborations