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Baili P.,Descriptive Studies and Health Planning Unit | Vicentini M.,Reggio Emilia Cancer Registry | Tumino R.,Ragusa Cancer Registry | Vercelli M.,Liguria Region Cancer Registry | And 9 more authors.
Acta Oncologica | Year: 2013

Cancer prevalence is the proportion of a population diagnosed with cancer. We present a method for differentiating prevalence into the proportions expected to survive without relapse, die of cancer within a year, and die of cancer within 10 years or survive with relapse at the end of the 10th year. Material and methods. The method was applied to samples of colorectal cancer cases, randomly extracted from four Italian cancer registries (CRs). The CRs collected data on treatments, local relapses, distant relapses, and causes of death: 1) over the entire follow-up to 31 December 2007 for 601 cases diagnosed in 2002 (cohort approach); 2) over a single year (2007) for five cohorts of cases defined by year of diagnosis (from 1997 to 2001), alive at 1 January 2007 (total 298 cases). The cohorts were combined into a fictitious cohort with 10 years survival experience. For each year j after diagnosis the health status of cases alive at the beginning of j was estimated at the end of the 10th year. From these estimates the 10-year colorectal cancer prevalence was differentiated. Results. We estimated: 74.7% alive without relapse or not undergoing treatment at the end of 10 years; 8.1% had died of colorectal cancer within a year; 11.4% had died of colorectal cancer 1-10 years after diagnosis or had relapsed or were undergoing treatment at the end of the 10th year; and 5.8% had died of other causes. Conclusions. We have introduced a new method for estimating the healthcare and rehabilitation demands of cancer survivors based on CR data plus treatment and relapse data specifically collected for samples of cases archived by CRs. © 2013 Informa Healthcare. Source

Bouvier A.-M.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Sant M.,Fondazione IRCCS | Verdecchia A.,Istituto Superiore di Sanita | Forman D.,Northern and Yorkshire Cancer Registry | And 15 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2010

Background: Wide geographic variations in survival for gastric cancer in Europe have been reported. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of stage at diagnosis, treatment and cancer characteristics on long-term survival for gastric cancer in populations covered by cancer registries. Methods: We analysed survival in 4620 cases of gastric cancer from 17 European population-based cancer registries from 8 countries. Univariate and multivariate regression of relative survival were performed. Results: Five-year relative survival varied between 10.6% and 24.0%, while 10-year survival ranged from 7.7% to 23.0%. After adjustment for age and sex, the regional excess hazard ratio (EHR) of death was significantly higher in Ragusa, Granada, Yorkshire, Slovakia, Slovenia and Poland than in France, Northern Italy, The Netherlands and the Basque Country. After further adjustment for surgical resection versus no resection (a proxy of stage), the EHR of death remained significantly higher only in Granada and Yorkshire than in the reference country (France). After adjustment for stage, the EHR was significantly higher only in Yorkshire (EHR: 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.29-1.77). The EHR in this area was limited to the first year following diagnosis. Conclusion: Differences across Europe in gastric cancer survival depend to a large extent on differences in stage at diagnosis. However they do not explain all variations. Quality of management and treatment can explain some differences. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

Di Salvo F.,Analytical Epidemiology and Health Impact Unit | Baili P.,Analytical Epidemiology and Health Impact Unit | Vicentini M.,Reggio Emilia Cancer Registry | Tumino R.,Ragusa Cancer Registry | And 37 more authors.
Tumori | Year: 2014

Aims and background. In Italy more than 55% of cancer patients live for more than 5 years after diagnosis, sometimes with several cancer-related sequelae. For this reason rehabilitation must offer not only physical interventions but also psychological, clinical, social and nutritional support. The CAREMORE pilot study was designed to assess whether cancer registries could serve to collect information on rehabilitation services, to describe and quantify the services provided by the National Health Service, and to examine the allocation of rehabilitation services to cancer patients. Methods and study design. This was a pilot population-based cohort study. A sample of 1200 patients was identified from the databases of the Varese, Genoa, Reggio Emilia, Sassari and Ragusa cancer registries, all diagnosed in 2002 and followed for 5 years. For 4 cancer sites a list of rehabilitation items to be collected was drafted by a joint community of researchers and voluntary associations, with variables regarding rehabilitation data and follow-up. Data were analyzed by groups of patients, vital status, sex, and age. Results. This pilot study suggested it is useful to collect information on several rehabilitation services: disability benefits, home care, aids and other support; it was not possible to collect reliable information on nutritional and psychological rehabilitation. In all, 36% of the sample applied for disability benefits, but with important differences between cancer sites. Eleven percent of the sample obtained home care, with no substantial differences between cancer sites, and 16% received at least one aid, with percentages varying from 27% for rectal cancer to 8% for lymphoma patients. Conclusions. The pilot study indicated that cancer registries could collect information on rehabilitation services. In the future it would be interesting to expand the roles of these registries to factors that influence quality of life, taking into account the possibility of collecting more information by actually interviewing patients. Copyright - Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore. Source

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