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LIG is a spongy version of graphene, the single-atom layer of carbon atoms. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour developed it three years ago by burning partway through an inexpensive polyimide sheet with a laser, which turned the surface into a lattice of interconnected graphene sheets. The researchers have since suggested uses for the material in wearable electronics and fuel cells and for superhydrophobic or superhydrophilic surfaces. According to their report in the American Chemical Society's ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, LIG also protects surfaces from biofouling, the buildup of microorganisms, plants or other biological material on wet surfaces. "This form of graphene is extremely resistant to biofilm formation, which has promise for places like water-treatment plants, oil-drilling operations, hospitals and ocean applications like underwater pipes that are sensitive to fouling," Tour said. "The antibacterial qualities when electricity is applied is a great additional benefit." When used as electrodes with a small applied voltage, LIG becomes the bacterial equivalent of a backyard bug zapper. Tests without the charge confirmed what has long been known—that graphene-based nanoparticles have antibacterial properties. When 1.1 to 2.5 volts were applied, the highly conductive LIG electrodes "greatly enhanced" those properties. Under the microscope, the researchers watched as fluorescently tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria in a solution with LIG electrodes above 1.1 volts were drawn toward the anode. Above 1.5 volts, the cells began to disappear and vanished completely within 30 seconds. At 2.5 volts, bacteria disappeared almost completely from the surface after one second. The Rice lab partnered with Professor Christopher Arnusch, a lecturer at the BGU Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research who specializes in water purification. Arnusch's lab tested LIG electrodes in a bacteria-laden solution with 10 percent secondary treated wastewater and found that after nine hours at 2.5 volts, 99.9 percent of the bacteria were killed and the electrodes strongly resisted biofilm formation. The researchers suspect bacteria may meet their demise through a combination of contact with the rough surface of LIG, the electrical charge and toxicity from localized production of hydrogen peroxide. The contact may be something like a knee hitting pavement, but in this case, the bacteria are all knee and the sharp graphene edges quickly destroy their membranes. Fortunately, LIG's anti-fouling properties keep dead bacteria from accumulating on the surface, Tour said. "The combination of passive biofouling inhibition and active voltage-induced microbial removal will likely make this a highly sought-after material for inhibiting the growth of troublesome natural fouling that plagues many industries," Tour said. More information: Swatantra P. Singh et al, Laser-Induced Graphene Layers and Electrodes Prevents Microbial Fouling and Exerts Antimicrobial Action, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces (2017). DOI: 10.1021/acsami.7b04863


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

itSMF USA, a chapter of itSMF International and the premier independent professional organization and forum for IT Service Management professionals in the U.S., has opened the 2017 nomination period for the Next Generation of itSMF USA Awards. The Next Generation of itSMF USA Awards celebrate and recognize success in service management in individuals, teams and Local Interest Groups/ Communities of Interest in a changing IT Eco-System. Service Management in Action Award: This award recognizes and celebrates excellence in Service Management (SM) relevance and business outcomes. Contributor of the Year Award: This award recognizes and celebrates individual Service Management excellence and participation in the SM industry and itSMF. LIG/CoI Excellence Award: There are three awards in this category which recognize Local Interest Groups (LIG)/Communities of Interest (CoI), specifically: High Performance LIG/CoI of the Year, Upstart LIG/CoI of the Year, and Sustained Performance LIG/Col of the Year. The Awards Selection Committee will select two finalists for the Service Management in Action Award and the itSMF Contributor of the Year Award. Each of the four finalists will receive a FUSION 17 Conference Pass, a travel stipend of $1,000, and they will be invited to be introduced as Award Finalists during the FUSION 17 Conference. From the finalists, the Awards Selection Committee will choose one winner for each category. Winners for all three categories will be awarded and recognized during ceremonies at FUSION 17. “The IT eco-system is changing rapidly. As the eco-system changes our employees, vendors and partners are changing right along with it. The ITSM Awards program is focused on recognizing individuals and teams that have made a difference to the IT community as well as to their business that they serve. I encourage companies and individuals to step back and take time to share the commitment and talent that is seen day to day. Share your accomplishments and be recognized in the industry for all that you do!” Cathy A. Kirch, itSMF President FUSION 17 unites over 1,600 industry leaders and practitioners and will take place October 31-November 3, 2017 at the Rosen Shingle Creek, Orlando, Florida. For more information and to submit your nomination, please visit itSMF USA awards.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

HOUSTON - (May 15, 2017) - Rice University scientists who invented laser-induced graphene (LIG) for applications like supercapacitors have now figured out a way to make the spongy graphene either superhydrophobic or superhydrophilic. Until recently, the Rice lab of James Tour made LIG only in open air, using a laser to burn part of the way through a flexible polyimide sheet to get interconnected flakes of graphene. But putting the polymer in a closed environment with various gases changed the product's properties. Forming LIG in argon or hydrogen makes it superhydrophobic, or water-avoiding, a property highly valued for separating water from oil or de-icing surfaces. Forming it in oxygen or air makes it superhydrophilic, or water-attracting, and that makes it highly soluble. The research at Rice and at Ben-Gurion University in Israel is the subject of a paper in Advanced Materials. "Labs could make graphene either hydrophobic or hydrophilic before, but it involved multiple steps of either wet-chemical or chemical vapor deposition processes," Tour said. "We're doing this in one step with relatively cheap materials in a homemade atmosphere chamber." The labs got a bonus when they discovered that fabricating LIG in oxygen increased the number of defects -- 5- and 7-atom rings -- in the graphene flakes, improving its capacitance and its performance when used as an electrode material for microsupercapacitors. Changes in the chemical content of the gas and even changes in the direction of the laser raster pattern altered the material, leading the researchers to believe LIG's hydrophobic or -philic properties could be tuned. They also discovered when they scraped graphene off of a hydrophilic sheet of polymer and turned it into a film, the result was hydrophobic instead. "That leads us to believe the surface orientation of LIG's flakes have a lot to do with how it reacts with water," Tour said. "If the edges are more exposed, it appears to be hydrophilic; if the basal planes are more exposed, their hydrophobic properties take over." What makes a material "super" in either direction is the angle at which it encounters water. A material with a contact angle of 0 degrees is considered superhydrophilic. In this case, water would lay on the material in a puddle. If the angle is 150 degrees or more, that's superhydrophobic; the angle is determined by how much the water beads. (An angle of 180 degrees would be a sphere sitting perfectly on top of LIG.) The discovery that surface type and chemistry affect LIG should also allow some leeway in adjusting the material's properties, Tour said. In fact, when they used a sulfur/fluorine gas to make it, they raised LIG's superhydrophobicity to 160 degrees. Yilun Li, a graduate student at Rice, is lead author of the paper. Co-authors are Rice graduate students Duy Xuan Luong and Jibo Zhang, undergraduate Yash Tarkunde, research scientist Carter Kittrell and former postdoctoral researcher Yongsung Ji; and graduate student Franklin Sargunaraj and co-principal investigator Christopher Arnusch, a lecturer at the Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research at Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel. Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry as well as a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering at Rice. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research and its Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative and the Vietnam Education Foundation supported the research. This news release can be found online at http://news. A water droplet bounces on the surface of laser-induced graphene with a sulfur and fluorine gas in the chamber. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) Laser-induced graphene created in the presence of argon gas is superhydrophobic, meaning it avoids water. The process developed at Rice University makes materials that can be superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic from inexpensive materials and in one step. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) Superhydrophobic (water-avoiding) laser-induced graphene created in the presence of argon gas could be useful for de-icing applications or separating water and oil. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) A custom chamber built by researchers at Rice University allowed them to refine their process for creating laser-induced graphene. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) A custom-built chamber allows Rice University researchers to grow laser-induced graphene in various environments. The laser is fired at polymer through the zinc-selenium window. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation's top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice's undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for happiest students and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger's Personal Finance. To read "What they're saying about Rice," go to http://tinyurl. .


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: phys.org

Until recently, the Rice lab of James Tour made LIG only in open air, using a laser to burn part of the way through a flexible polyimide sheet to get interconnected flakes of graphene. But putting the polymer in a closed environment with various gases changed the product's properties. Forming LIG in argon or hydrogen makes it superhydrophobic, or water-avoiding, a property highly valued for separating water from oil or de-icing surfaces. Forming it in oxygen or air makes it superhydrophilic, or water-attracting, and that makes it highly soluble. The research at Rice and at Ben-Gurion University in Israel is the subject of a paper in Advanced Materials. "Labs could make graphene either hydrophobic or hydrophilic before, but it involved multiple steps of either wet-chemical or chemical vapor deposition processes," Tour said. "We're doing this in one step with relatively cheap materials in a homemade atmosphere chamber." The labs got a bonus when they discovered that fabricating LIG in oxygen increased the number of defects – 5- and 7-atom rings – in the graphene flakes, improving its capacitance and its performance when used as an electrode material for microsupercapacitors. Changes in the chemical content of the gas and even changes in the direction of the laser raster pattern altered the material, leading the researchers to believe LIG's hydrophobic or –philic properties could be tuned. They also discovered when they scraped graphene off of a hydrophilic sheet of polymer and turned it into a film, the result was hydrophobic instead. "That leads us to believe the surface orientation of LIG's flakes have a lot to do with how it reacts with water," Tour said. "If the edges are more exposed, it appears to be hydrophilic; if the basal planes are more exposed, their hydrophobic properties take over." What makes a material "super" in either direction is the angle at which it encounters water. A material with a contact angle of 0 degrees is considered superhydrophilic. In this case, water would lay on the material in a puddle. If the angle is 150 degrees or more, that's superhydrophobic; the angle is determined by how much the water beads. (An angle of 180 degrees would be a sphere sitting perfectly on top of LIG.) The discovery that surface type and chemistry affect LIG should also allow some leeway in adjusting the material's properties, Tour said. In fact, when they used a sulfur/fluorine gas to make it, they raised LIG's superhydrophobicity to 160 degrees. A custom chamber built by researchers at Rice University allowed them to refine their process for creating laser-induced graphene. Credit: the Tour Group More information: Yilun Li et al. Laser-Induced Graphene in Controlled Atmospheres: From Superhydrophilic to Superhydrophobic Surfaces, Advanced Materials (2017). DOI: 10.1002/adma.201700496


Home > Press > Gas gives laser-induced graphene super properties: Rice University study shows inexpensive material can be superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic Abstract: Rice University scientists who invented laser-induced graphene (LIG) for applications like supercapacitors have now figured out a way to make the spongy graphene either superhydrophobic or superhydrophilic. And it's a gas. Water rolls off a superhydrophilic laser-induced graphene pattern placed inside a superhydrophobic LIG frame. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) A water droplet bounces on the surface of laser-induced graphene with a sulfur and fluorine gas in the chamber. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) Until recently, the Rice lab of James Tour made LIG only in open air, using a laser to burn part of the way through a flexible polyimide sheet to get interconnected flakes of graphene. But putting the polymer in a closed environment with various gases changed the product's properties. Forming LIG in argon or hydrogen makes it superhydrophobic, or water-avoiding, a property highly valued for separating water from oil or de-icing surfaces. Forming it in oxygen or air makes it superhydrophilic, or water-attracting, and that makes it highly soluble. The research at Rice and at Ben-Gurion University in Israel is the subject of a paper in Advanced Materials. "Labs could make graphene either hydrophobic or hydrophilic before, but it involved multiple steps of either wet-chemical or chemical vapor deposition processes," Tour said. "We're doing this in one step with relatively cheap materials in a homemade atmosphere chamber." The labs got a bonus when they discovered that fabricating LIG in oxygen increased the number of defects – 5- and 7-atom rings – in the graphene flakes, improving its capacitance and its performance when used as an electrode material for microsupercapacitors. Changes in the chemical content of the gas and even changes in the direction of the laser raster pattern altered the material, leading the researchers to believe LIG's hydrophobic or –philic properties could be tuned. They also discovered when they scraped graphene off of a hydrophilic sheet of polymer and turned it into a film, the result was hydrophobic instead. "That leads us to believe the surface orientation of LIG's flakes have a lot to do with how it reacts with water," Tour said. "If the edges are more exposed, it appears to be hydrophilic; if the basal planes are more exposed, their hydrophobic properties take over." What makes a material "super" in either direction is the angle at which it encounters water. A material with a contact angle of 0 degrees is considered superhydrophilic. In this case, water would lay on the material in a puddle. If the angle is 150 degrees or more, that's superhydrophobic; the angle is determined by how much the water beads. (An angle of 180 degrees would be a sphere sitting perfectly on top of LIG.) The discovery that surface type and chemistry affect LIG should also allow some leeway in adjusting the material's properties, Tour said. In fact, when they used a sulfur/fluorine gas to make it, they raised LIG's superhydrophobicity to 160 degrees. Yilun Li, a graduate student at Rice, is lead author of the paper. Co-authors are Rice graduate students Duy Xuan Luong and Jibo Zhang, undergraduate Yash Tarkunde, research scientist Carter Kittrell and former postdoctoral researcher Yongsung Ji; and graduate student Franklin Sargunaraj and co-principal investigator Christopher Arnusch, a lecturer at the Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research at Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel. Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry as well as a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering at Rice. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research and its Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative and the Vietnam Education Foundation supported the research. About Rice University Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for happiest students and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview . Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Scientists at Rice University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have discovered that laser-induced graphene (LIG) is a highly effective anti-fouling material and, when electrified, bacteria zapper. LIG is a spongy version of graphene, the single-atom layer of carbon atoms. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour developed it three years ago by burning partway through an inexpensive polyimide sheet with a laser, which turned the surface into a lattice of interconnected graphene sheets. The researchers have since suggested uses for the material in wearable electronics and fuel cells and for superhydrophobic or superhydrophilic surfaces. According to their report in the American Chemical Society's ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, LIG also protects surfaces from biofouling, the buildup of microorganisms, plants or other biological material on wet surfaces. "This form of graphene is extremely resistant to biofilm formation, which has promise for places like water-treatment plants, oil-drilling operations, hospitals and ocean applications like underwater pipes that are sensitive to fouling," Tour said. "The antibacterial qualities when electricity is applied is a great additional benefit." When used as electrodes with a small applied voltage, LIG becomes the bacterial equivalent of a backyard bug zapper. Tests without the charge confirmed what has long been known -- that graphene-based nanoparticles have antibacterial properties. When 1.1 to 2.5 volts were applied, the highly conductive LIG electrodes "greatly enhanced" those properties. Under the microscope, the researchers watched as fluorescently tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria in a solution with LIG electrodes above 1.1 volts were drawn toward the anode. Above 1.5 volts, the cells began to disappear and vanished completely within 30 seconds. At 2.5 volts, bacteria disappeared almost completely from the surface after one second. The Rice lab partnered with Professor Christopher Arnusch, a lecturer at the BGU Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research who specializes in water purification. Arnusch's lab tested LIG electrodes in a bacteria-laden solution with 10 percent secondary treated wastewater and found that after nine hours at 2.5 volts, 99.9 percent of the bacteria were killed and the electrodes strongly resisted biofilm formation. The researchers suspect bacteria may meet their demise through a combination of contact with the rough surface of LIG, the electrical charge and toxicity from localized production of hydrogen peroxide. The contact may be something like a knee hitting pavement, but in this case, the bacteria are all knee and the sharp graphene edges quickly destroy their membranes. Fortunately, LIG's anti-fouling properties keep dead bacteria from accumulating on the surface, Tour said. "The combination of passive biofouling inhibition and active voltage-induced microbial removal will likely make this a highly sought-after material for inhibiting the growth of troublesome natural fouling that plagues many industries," Tour said.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

Scientists at Rice University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have discovered that laser-induced graphene (LIG) is a highly effective anti-fouling material and, when electrified, bacteria zapper. LIG is a spongy version of graphene, the single-atom layer of carbon atoms. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour developed it three years ago by burning partway through an inexpensive polyimide sheet with a laser, which turned the surface into a lattice of interconnected graphene sheets. The researchers have since suggested uses for the material in wearable electronics and fuel cells and for superhydrophobic or superhydrophilic surfaces. According to their report in the American Chemical Society’s ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, LIG also protects surfaces from biofouling, the buildup of microorganisms, plants or other biological material on wet surfaces. “This form of graphene is extremely resistant to biofilm formation, which has promise for places like water-treatment plants, oil-drilling operations, hospitals and ocean applications like underwater pipes that are sensitive to fouling,” Tour says. “The antibacterial qualities when electricity is applied is a great additional benefit.” When used as electrodes with a small applied voltage, LIG becomes the bacterial equivalent of a backyard bug zapper. Tests without the charge confirmed what has long been known — that graphene-based nanoparticles have antibacterial properties. When 1.1 to 2.5 volts were applied, the highly conductive LIG electrodes “greatly enhanced” those properties. Under the microscope, the researchers watched as fluorescently tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria in a solution with LIG electrodes above 1.1 volts were drawn toward the anode. Above 1.5 volts, the cells began to disappear and vanished completely within 30 seconds. At 2.5 volts, bacteria disappeared almost completely from the surface after one second.


The modification of graphene-based materials is an important topic in the field of materials research. This study aims to expand the range of properties for laser-induced graphene (LIG), specifically to tune the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity of the LIG surfaces. While LIG is normally prepared in the air, here, using selected gas atmospheres, a large change in the water contact angle on the as-prepared LIG surfaces has been observed, from 0° (superhydrophilic) when using O or air, to >150° (superhydrophobic) when using Ar or H . Characterization of the newly derived surfaces shows that the different wetting properties are due to the surface morphology and chemical composition of the LIG. Applications of the superhydrophobic LIG are shown in oil/water separation as well as anti-icing surfaces, while the versatility of the controlled atmosphere chamber fabrication method is demonstrated through the improved microsupercapacitor performance generated from LIG films prepared in an O atmosphere.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

— In this report, the global Condoms market is valued at USD XX million in 2016 and is expected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022. Geographically, this report split global into several key Regions, with sales (K Units), revenue (Million USD), market share and growth rate of Condoms for these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), covering United States China Europe Japan Southeast Asia India Global Condoms market competition by top manufacturers/players, with Condoms sales volume, Price (USD/Unit), revenue (Million USD) and market share for each manufacturer/player; the top players including Karex Thai Nippon Rubber TTK-LIG HLL Lifecare Suretex(Ansell) Qingdao Durex Guilin Latex Unidus Corp Doubleone Latex Pleasure Latex SSL(Thailand) Okamoto Suretex India(Ansell) Church&Dwight Nulatex Sdn Bhd J.K. Ansell Dalian Latex Double Butterfly Angel Latex Human-care Latex MINGBAN HBM Xibei On the basis of product, this report displays the sales volume (K Units), revenue (Million USD), product price (USD/Unit), market share and growth rate of each type, primarily split into Latex Condom Non-latex Condom On the basis on the end users/applications, this report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications/end users, sales volume, market share and growth rate of Condoms for each application, including Age: Under 25 Age: 25-34 Age: 35-49 Age: Above 50 Table of Content: Key Points Global Condoms Sales Market Report 2017 1 Condoms Market Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Condoms 1.2 Classification of Condoms by Product Category 1.2.1 Global Condoms Market Size (Sales) Comparison by Type (2012-2022) 1.2.2 Global Condoms Market Size (Sales) Market Share by Type (Product Category) in 2016 1.2.3 Latex Condom 1.2.4 Non-latex Condom 1.3 Global Condoms Market by Application/End Users 1.3.1 Global Condoms Sales (Volume) and Market Share Comparison by Application (2012-2022) 1.3.2 Age: Under 25 1.3.3 Age: 25-34 1.3.4 Age: 35-49 1.3.5 Age: Above 50 1.4 Global Condoms Market by Region 1.4.1 Global Condoms Market Size (Value) Comparison by Region (2012-2022) 1.4.2 United States Condoms Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.3 China Condoms Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.4 Europe Condoms Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.5 Japan Condoms Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.6 Southeast Asia Condoms Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.7 India Condoms Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value and Volume) of Condoms (2012-2022) 1.5.1 Global Condoms Sales and Growth Rate (2012-2022) 1.5.2 Global Condoms Revenue and Growth Rate (2012-2022) … 9 Global Condoms Players/Suppliers Profiles and Sales Data 9.1 Karex 9.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.1.2 Condoms Product Category, Application and Specification 9.1.2.1 Product A 9.1.2.2 Product B 9.1.3 Karex Condoms Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.2 Thai Nippon Rubber 9.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.2.2 Condoms Product Category, Application and Specification 9.2.2.1 Product A 9.2.2.2 Product B 9.2.3 Thai Nippon Rubber Condoms Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.3 TTK-LIG 9.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.3.2 Condoms Product Category, Application and Specification 9.3.2.1 Product A 9.3.2.2 Product B 9.3.3 TTK-LIG Condoms Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.4 HLL Lifecare 9.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.4.2 Condoms Product Category, Application and Specification 9.4.2.1 Product A 9.4.2.2 Product B 9.4.3 HLL Lifecare Condoms Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.5 Suretex(Ansell) 9.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.5.2 Condoms Product Category, Application and Specification 9.5.2.1 Product A 9.5.2.2 Product B 9.5.3 Suretex(Ansell) Condoms Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.6 Qingdao Durex 9.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.6.2 Condoms Product Category, Application and Specification 9.6.2.1 Product A 9.6.2.2 Product B 9.6.3 Qingdao Durex Condoms Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.7 Guilin Latex 9.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.7.2 Condoms Product Category, Application and Specification 9.7.2.1 Product A 9.7.2.2 Product B 9.7.3 Guilin Latex Condoms Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.8 Unidus Corp 9.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.8.2 Condoms Product Category, Application and Specification 9.8.2.1 Product A 9.8.2.2 Product B …Continued For more information, please visit http://www.wiseguyreports.com


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

— Real estate developer Anil Kuchhal has announced a slew of projects under Rajasthan’s Mukhyamantri Jan Awas Yojana. The project prioritizes affordable housing for the low-income group living in urban areas. Some of the projects launched under the Anil Kuchhal owned AKG Affordable Housing banner include Pari Residency, Rishab Apartment, and Pallavi Apartment. “Mr. Anil Kuchhal has more than 35 years of experience in the real estate arena. He has managed housing projects for several leading real estate projects including Mangalam, Parsvnath, DLF, and Sun City,” says a spokesperson for the company. Explaining more about his affordable housing project, Anil Kuchhal says, ‘We now have various projects in Ajmer Road, Sikar Road, Raja Park, and Tonk Park, in several stages of completion. These are 1 BHK and 2 BHK flats. The Apartments are Ground + 2 and Ground +3 plans and self-contained with all modern amenities. When builders across Jaipur were wary about participating in the Jan Awas Yojana, we were one among the very few builders to accept and implement the scheme”. The company offers homes to the Economically Weaker Sections (EWG) and the Low Income Group (LIG) segments in several places across Jaipur. Anil Kuchhal is a real estate developer offers affordable housing schemes in and around Jaipur under the Affordable Housing Scheme for EWG and LIG segments. He has more than 35 years of experience in the business. He started at a very young age, often managing his parent’s Ayurvedic medical practice, and later venturing out to set his own business. For more information, please visit https://twitter.com/anilkuchhal

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