Lifestyle Research Group

London, United Kingdom

Lifestyle Research Group

London, United Kingdom
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Ray M.M.,Brigham Young University | Steven G.A.,Lifestyle Research Group | Tonya P.V.,Lincoln Industries | Howe G.,Lincoln Industries | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine | Year: 2011

OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the level of participation and effectiveness of a worksite wellness program in a small business setting. METHODS: Three years of wellness participation and risk data from Lincoln Industries was analyzed. RESULTS: All Lincoln Industry employees participated in at least some level of wellness programming. Significant improvements in body fat, blood pressure, and flexibility were observed across time. The largest improvements in risk were seen among older employees and those with the highest baseline values. CONCLUSIONS: This small business was able to improve the health of the entire workforce population by integrating wellness deeply into their culture and operations. Replication of this program in other small business settings could have a large impact on public health since 60 million adults in the United States work in small businesses. © 2011 The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.


Merrill R.M.,Brigham Young University | Aldana S.G.,Lifestyle Research Group | Pope J.E.,Healthways | Anderson D.R.,Health Enhancement Research Organization Research Committee | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine | Year: 2011

Objective: To measure the effectiveness of a wellness program in a small company using four well-being indicators designed to measure dimensions of physical health, emotional health, healthy behavior, and basic access to health-related conditions and services. Methods: Indicator scores were obtained and compared between Lincoln Industries employees and workers in the neighboring Lincoln/Omaha community during 2009. Results: Nearly all Lincoln Industries employees participated in the wellness program. Physical health, mental health, and healthy behavior were significantly greater for Lincoln Industries employees. Self-perceived access to basic needs was not significantly greater among Lincoln Industries employees. Conclusion: Well-being index scores provide evidence for the effectiveness of the wellness program in this small company setting with respect to better dimensions of physical health, emotional health, and healthy behavior than geographically similar workers. Copyright © 2011 by American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.


Oldknow K.J.,Lifestyle Research Group | Seebacher J.,Harvard University | Goswami T.,Harvard University | Villen J.,Harvard University | And 5 more authors.
Endocrinology | Year: 2013

Follistatin-like 3 (FSTL3) is a glycoprotein that binds and inhibits the action of TGFβ ligands such as activin. The roles played by FSTL3 and activin signaling in organ development and homeostasis are not fully understood. The authors show mice deficient in FSTL3 develop markedly enlarged testes that are also delayed in their age-related regression. These FSTL3 knockout mice exhibit increased Sertoli cell numbers, allowing for increased spermatogenesis but otherwise showing normal testicular function. The data show that FSTL3 deletion leads to increased AKT signaling and SIRT1 expression in the testis. This demonstrates a cross-talk between TGFβ ligand and AKT signaling and leads to a potential mechanism for increased cellular survival and antiaging. The findings identify crucial roles for FSTL3 in limiting testis organ size and promoting age-related testicular regression. Copyright © 2013 by The Endocrine Society.


Merrill R.M.,Brigham Young University | Aldana S.G.,Lifestyle Research Group | Pope J.E.,Healthways | Anderson D.R.,Health Enhancement Research Organization HERO Research Committee | And 2 more authors.
Population Health Management | Year: 2012

The objective of this study is to identify the contribution that selected demographic characteristics, health behaviors, physical health outcomes, and workplace environmental factors have on presenteeism (on-the-job productivity loss attributed to poor health and other personal issues). Analyses are based on a cross-sectional survey administered to 3 geographically diverse US companies in 2010. Work-related factors had the greatest influence on presenteeism (eg, too much to do but not enough time to do it, insufficient technological support/ resources). Personal problems and financial stress/concerns also contributed substantially to presenteeism. Factors with less contribution to presenteeism included physical limitations, depression or anxiety, inadequate job training, and problems with supervisors and coworkers. Presenteeism was greatest for those ages 30-49, women, separated/divorced/widowed employees, and those with a high school degree or some college. Clerical/office workers and service workers had higher presenteeism. Managers and professionals had the highest level of presenteeism related to having too much to do but too little time to do it, and transportation workers had the greatest presenteeism because of physical health limitations. Lowering presenteeism will require that employers have realistic expectations of workers, help workers prioritize, and provide sufficient technological support. Financial stress and concerns may warrant financial planning services. Health promotion interventions aimed at improving nutrition and physical and mental health also may contribute to reducing presenteeism. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Merrill R.M.,Brigham Young University | Aldana S.G.,Lifestyle Research Group | Pope J.E.,Healthways | Anderson D.R.,Health Enhancement Research Organization Research Committee | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine | Year: 2013

OBJECTIVE:: To better understand the combined influence of employee engagement, health behavior, and physical health on job performance and absenteeism. METHODS:: Analyses were based on 20,114 employees who completed the Healthways Well-Being Assessment from 2008 to 2010. Employees represented three geographically dispersed companies in the United States. RESULTS:: Employee engagement, health behavior, and physical health indices were simultaneously significantly associated with job performance and also with absenteeism. Employee engagement had a greater association with job performance than did the health behavior or physical health indices, whereas the physical health index was more strongly associated with absenteeism. Specific elements of the indices were evaluated for association with self-rated job performance and absenteeism. CONCLUSION:: Efforts to improve worker productivity should take a holistic approach encompassing employee health improvement and engagement strategies. Copyright © 2013 by American College of Occupational and Environmental.


Merrill R.M.,Brigham Young University | Aldana S.G.,Lifestyle Research Group | Garrett J.,Syngenta | Ross C.,Syngenta
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine | Year: 2011

This study assessed the effectiveness of a worksite wellness program. A within-group study design was conducted. Assessment was based on 3737 continuously employed workers at a large agribusiness during 2007-2009. More than 80% of employees participated in the program, with a higher percentage of women participating. Clinically significant improvements occurred in those who were underweight, those with high systolic or diastolic blood pressure, high total cholesterol, high low-density lipoprotein, low high-density lipoprotein, high triglycerides, and high glucose. Among obese employee participants, significant improvements occurred in selected mental health and dietary variables. Among those who lowered their BMI, significant decrease occurred in fat intake, and significant increase resulted in weekly aerobic exercise and feelings of calmness and peace, happiness, ability to cope with stress, and more physical energy. Copyright © 2011 by American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.


Aldana S.G.,Lifestyle Research Group | Anderson D.R.,Health Enhancement Research Organization HERO Research Committee | Adams T.B.,Lifestyle Research Group | Whitmer R.W.,Health Enhancement Research Organization HERO | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine | Year: 2012

OBJECTIVE: To identify the need for worksite cultures of health, the organizational factors that support worksite cultures of health, the tools that have been used to measure worksite cultures of health, and the research needs related to healthy worksite culture. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey involving a sample of 500 companies representing a broad spectrum of industries and business sectors. A literature review was conducted. RESULTS: Similar to a culture of safety that encourages safer behaviors and enables a safer workplace, a culture of health provides a supportive work leadership with a favorable work environment and health-related policies that promote employee health and result in substantial decrease in employee health risks and medical costs. CONCLUSION: Worksite policies and environments supporting a culture of health are important to helping employees adopt and maintain healthy behaviors. © 2012 The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.


Robertson R.D.,Lifestyle Research Group | Mukherjee A.,Lifestyle Research Group
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications | Year: 2012

Follistatin-like 3 (FSTL3) is a secreted glycoprotein that forms inactive complexes with and acts as an endogenous inhibitor of TGFβ ligands such as activin, myostatin and GDF11. FSTL3 gene deleted mice (FSTL3 KO) are viable, fertile and show a constellation of metabolic abnormalities, including those involving glucose and lipid homoeostasis, suggesting a role for FSTL3 and TGFβ ligand signaling in these systems. To identify additional roles of FSTL3 and the ligands it inhibits we have used a synexpression analysis strategy. By mining microarray RNA expression data we have identified a group of 9 genes, the expression of which closely follow that of FSTL3 in both mouse and human tissues. After classifying the tissues studied according to physiological systems we found that within each system the expression of a majority, but not all, of the genes are strongly correlated with FSTL3 expression. Further, the best correlation of expression was seen in the cardiovascular system. Importantly, the promoter regions of a number of these synexpression genes have putative SMAD binding elements and in cultured embryonic fibroblasts the expression of a subset of these genes are induced in the absence of FSTL3 or in WT cells upon activin treatment. Taken together, we have identified a group of activin responsive genes the expression of which is closely related to and regulated by FSTL3. These findings link FSTL3 and TGFβ ligand signaling and a novel subset of the synexpression group of genes to organ/tissue-specific regulatory pathways. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Lifestyle Research Group
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of occupational and environmental medicine | Year: 2012

To identify the need for worksite cultures of health, the organizational factors that support worksite cultures of health, the tools that have been used to measure worksite cultures of health, and the research needs related to healthy worksite culture.A cross-sectional survey involving a sample of 500 companies representing a broad spectrum of industries and business sectors. A literature review was conducted.Similar to a culture of safety that encourages safer behaviors and enables a safer workplace, a culture of health provides a supportive work leadership with a favorable work environment and health-related policies that promote employee health and result in substantial decrease in employee health risks and medical costs.Worksite policies and environments supporting a culture of health are important to helping employees adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.


PubMed | Lifestyle Research Group
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biochemical and biophysical research communications | Year: 2012

Follistatin-like 3 (FSTL3) is a secreted glycoprotein that forms inactive complexes with and acts as an endogenous inhibitor of TGF ligands such as activin, myostatin and GDF11. FSTL3 gene deleted mice (FSTL3 KO) are viable, fertile and show a constellation of metabolic abnormalities, including those involving glucose and lipid homoeostasis, suggesting a role for FSTL3 and TGF ligand signaling in these systems. To identify additional roles of FSTL3 and the ligands it inhibits we have used a synexpression analysis strategy. By mining microarray RNA expression data we have identified a group of 9 genes, the expression of which closely follow that of FSTL3 in both mouse and human tissues. After classifying the tissues studied according to physiological systems we found that within each system the expression of a majority, but not all, of the genes are strongly correlated with FSTL3 expression. Further, the best correlation of expression was seen in the cardiovascular system. Importantly, the promoter regions of a number of these synexpression genes have putative SMAD binding elements and in cultured embryonic fibroblasts the expression of a subset of these genes are induced in the absence of FSTL3 or in WT cells upon activin treatment. Taken together, we have identified a group of activin responsive genes the expression of which is closely related to and regulated by FSTL3. These findings link FSTL3 and TGF ligand signaling and a novel subset of the synexpression group of genes to organ/tissue-specific regulatory pathways.

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