Congress, United States
Congress, United States

Time filter

Source Type

WASHINGTON, DC--(Marketwired - April 24, 2017) - On Tuesday, April 25, The ASCAP Foundation and The Library of Congress will jointly present the ninth annual "We Write the Songs" event at the historic Coolidge Auditorium in The Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The evening celebrates the gift by The ASCAP Foundation to the Library of Congress of the original manuscripts, lead sheets, lyrics sheets, photos and letters of some of America's greatest creators of words and music.


— In the wake of innovative technologies reshaping drastically the way how people traditionally perceived information, studied, worked, performed day-to-day duties, and engaged with the broader society. Computers have already irreversibly reshaped how we interact with data and gain knowledge across all age groups. As we progress into a more digitalized world, it is crucial to acknowledge the benefits of incorporating new technologies into many aspects of our education system, including developing and improving school curriculums. Jay Eitner, nationally recognized educator and outspoken advocate of public school system modernization, talks about the importance of adapting modern technologies as an essential part of curriculum and ultimately ensuring the delivery of vital skills to young generations. Students today have a greater degree of access to information than ever before. Educators need to understand that young generations enter the school system with a completely different set of expectations, seeking an environment as similarly interactive and engaging as that provided through the screens of their computers. Classrooms are no longer limited to teacher-student interaction only. In today’s modern world, you can browse through the Library of Congress’s music archives to compliment a music class or take an exciting virtual field trip with your students to discover the collection of the Louvre Museum in Paris without ever leaving the school building. It is becoming increasingly popular worldwide to pursue distance learning degrees from universities offering their courses via the Internet, challenging traditional face-to-face learning norms. Technologies enrich institutional activities and boost soft skills amongst students by fostering communication, creativity and critical thinking in a math and writing-oriented education system. Additionally, the implementation of instructional multimedia software and web-based materials helps to make use of class hours more effectively, delivering course material in a captivating manner via online lectures or audio-video materials thus allowing additional time for teachers to focus on the more challenging aspects of a given subject. This model is ideally suited for use in primary or secondary education settings and has proven to be successful by various studies. Modern advancements have become beneficial to more than just the student; they can also be used for the effective professional development of teachers, administrators and even parents. Jay Eitner provides complimentary webinars, podcasts, and e-books on all aspects of the topic at EitnerEducation.com. The presentations often discuss how educators can greatly benefit from free and underutilized technology and apps, including Prezi, Powerpoint, Excel, SMART Boards, and other audio-video material and web-based content, while developing curriculum to meet the ever-changing needs of their students. For much of his career as an educator, Jay Eitner has advocated for student-centered and data-driven classrooms. He began his journey in public education as a teacher working in Roseville, New Jersey before moving to nationally recognized schools in East Brunswick. Mr. Eitner’s dedication to help advance educational opportunities for his students resulted in the receipt of over $140,000 in grants to fund various programs from the purchase of podcasting equipment to creating a fully-interactive gold rush experience learning model. His commitment to students and his achievements in New Jersey’s public school system have earned him the educators’ choice pick for the national Superintendent of the Year for the BAMMY awards in 2015. Jay Eitner - Nationally Recognized Pioneer in the Field of Education: http://jayeitnernews.com For more information, please visit http://jayeitnernews.com


Adams J.,Library of Congress
International Journal of Mass Spectrometry | Year: 2011

A quick and direct method for identifying organic components of papers in library and archival collections with minimal destructive sampling is needed for preservation, forensic, and general purposes. Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) is used for characterizing 16 reference papers of known manufacture in terms of their pulp composition and pitch contaminants. Unique mass spectra are obtained from bleached kraft, chemithermomechanical, and stone groundwood pulp papers in real time without extractions, derivatizations, chromatographic separations, and other time- and chemical-consuming sample preparations. Phytosteroids are volatilized from bleached hardwood kraft but not from bleached softwood kraft papers, which differentiates the two of them. The kraft papers are in turn differentiated from chemithermomechanical pulp papers by lignin-derived thermolyis products: syringyl products arise from hardwood, but guaiacyl and coumaryl products arise from softwood, chemithermomechanical pulp papers. Stone groundwood papers contain a number of extractives that are volatilized, which serve to differentiate them from all the other papers. Papers that contain rosin vs. alkyl ketene dimer (AKD) sizings are immediately differentiated. The DART-MS methodology is fast and simple, and the spectra are repeatable. Microsamples as small as ∼10 μg tweezed from the paper surface may be analyzed. These benchmark spectra are the prelude to further applications of DART-MS in paper research and the beginning of the development of a searchable library of DART-MS spectra of printing and writing papers by the Library of Congress.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 715.00K | Year: 2016

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 18.50K | Year: 2016

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 75.00K | Year: 2012

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 124.61K | Year: 2013

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 577.54K | Year: 2017

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 553.58K | Year: 2013

None


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 645.30K | Year: 2014

None

Loading Library of Congress collaborators
Loading Library of Congress collaborators