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Ritter K.,American Petroleum Institute | Lev-On M.,Levon Group | Shires T.,URS Corporation
AIChE 2013 - 2013 AIChE Spring Meeting and 9th Global Congress on Process Safety, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2013

A discussion on the lessons learned from the initial phases of reporting for the Petroleum and Natural Gas systems covers the unique aspects of reporting GHG emissions for onshore oil and natural gas production operations; the need to balance reliable information and reporting burden; industry's commitment to continuous improvement; and the purpose of reporting to companies as a means to highlight altering practices, e.g., venting and flaring minimization, and reduction of environmental impacts of operations. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2013 AIChE Spring Meeting & 9th Global Congress on Process Safety (San Antonio, TX 4/28-5/2/2013). Source


Ritter K.,American Petroleum Institute | Shires T.M.,URS Corporation | Lev-On M.,Levon Group
SPE Economics and Management | Year: 2015

The recent rapid expansion of natural-gas developments and usage worldwide are bringing into focus the need to improve understanding and characterization of greenhouse-gas (GHG) emission sources, including methane (CH4), associated with petroleum and natural-gas systems. New production technologies and practices, including those involving hydraulic fracturing, necessitate a thorough review of existing quantification methods for fugitive CH4 emissions from venting, flaring, and equipment leaks associated with petroleum and natural-gas systems and operations. In the past few years, widely divergent estimates have emerged regarding CH4 emissions from the US natural-gas-industry sector. Some discrepancies noted by industry surveys have led to a thorough review of newly available information and are leading to the improvement of estimation methods and emission factors associated with activities that comprise natural-gas systems. This has manifested itself in the engineering estimations that are used for compiling the national GHG Emissions Inventory and in the methods used by companies for reporting under the mandatory national GHG Reporting Program. Both the inventory and the reporting program are programs of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper presents results of a comparative analysis of GHGemissions data, including CH4, for key industry segments such as on-shore natural-gas production and natural-gas processing and their contribution to the Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems sector. The data analyzed will contrast the "top-down" assessments used in developing the GHG Emissions Inventory with the "bottom-up" estimation of actual emissions as reported under Subpart W of the GHG Reporting Program. The analysis will provide a comparison of the estimation methods and evaluation of the contribution of key sources with overall CH4 emissions. The ultimate goal of this effort is to incorporate the new information that is becoming available into consistent methods that can be used both for national GHG inventory development and for corporate reporting. Harmonization of these methods is expected to contribute to informing the public debate on naturalgas use and its role in mitigating overall GHG emissions. Copyright © 2015 Society of Petroleum Engineers. Source


Ritter K.,American Petroleum Institute | Shires T.M.,URS Corporation | Lev-On M.,Levon Group
Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE International Conference on Health, Safety and Environment 2014: The Journey Continues | Year: 2014

The recent rapid expansion of natural gas developments and utilization worldwide are bringing into focus the need to improve understanding and characterization of greenhouse gas emission sources, including methane, associated with petroleum and natural gas systems. New production technologies and practices, including those involving hydraulic fracturing, necessitate a thorough review of existing quantification methods for fugitive methane emissions from venting, flaring, and equipment leaks associated with petroleum and natural gas systems and operations. In the past few years widely divergent estimates have emerged regarding methane emissions from the U.S. natural gas industry sector. Some discrepancies noted by industry surveys have led to a thorough review of newly available information and are leading to the improvement of estimation methods and emission factors associated with activities that comprise natural gas systems. This has manifested itself in the engineering estimations that are used for compiling the national U. S. GHG Emissions Inventory and in the methods used by companies for reporting under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program. This paper will present results of a comparative analysis of GHG emissions data, including methane, for key industry segments such as on-shore natural gas production and natural gas processing and their contribution to the so called "petroleum and natural gas systems". The data analyzed will contrast the "top-down" assessments used in developing the U.S. GHG Emissions Inventory with the "bottom-up" estimation of actual emissions as reported under Subpart W of the GHGRP. The analysis will provide a comparison of the estimation methods and evaluation of the contribution of key sources to overall methane emissions. The ultimate goal of this effort is to incorporate the new information that is becoming available into consistent methods that can be used both for national GHG inventory development and for corporate reporting. Harmonization of these methods is expected to contribute to informing the public debate on natural gas use and its role in mitigating overall GHG emissions. Copyright 2013, Society of Petroleum Engineers. Source


Ritter K.,American Petroleum Institute | Lev-On M.,Levon Group
EM: Air and Waste Management Association's Magazine for Environmental Managers | Year: 2015

Nations around the world are increasingly relying on natural gas to meet their electricity and heating needs. The two most important advantages of natural gas over coal for power generation are the higher efficiencies of gas turbines over coal units, and the lower emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria pollutants. Source


Ritter K.,American Petroleum Institute | Lev-On M.,Levon Group | Shires T.,URS Corporation
Carbon Management | Year: 2014

Natural gas production is rapidly expanding globally using advanced techniques that are opening new areas to exploration and development. New techniques and practices, including those involving hydraulic fracturing, have spurred growth in natural gas based power generation that is credited with reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions with the co-benefit of improved air quality. These new operating practices necessitate a thorough review of existing quantification methods for methane emissions. This paper addresses the wide ranging efforts undertaken by the American Petroleum Institute over the past decade, or more, to provide robust data for characterizing methane emissions from natural gas operations. Industry efforts to characterize emission sources that are unique to natural gas production operations are also described. In order to inform the public debate on natural gas use and its role in mitigating overall GHG emissions this paper includes a comparison of new methane emission factors derived by industry to those used for the US National GHG Inventory. © 2015 Taylor & Francis. Source

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