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As a father of two young sons in 2010, Greene was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). He underwent multiple rounds of chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant. After beating the odds, he took his experience and made it his mission to raise awareness and dollars for those impacted by blood cancer. When Greene found out he was the recipient of the Pinnacle Award, he was thrilled. "I was honored to be invited to such an important conference which brings together passionate volunteers across the country to help LLS find blood cancer cures and help patients. LLS has more than 15 million volunteers who selflessly dedicate their time and energy to find cures. Together, we're leading the way to a world without blood cancer." The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society's Pinnacle Award honors and nationally recognizes an individual who has demonstrated exceptional leadership, dedication, and extraordinary commitment to LLS campaign fundraising efforts and the overall LLS mission, to find cures and ensure access to treatments for blood cancer patients. "Our volunteers make it possible for LLS to accomplish more than any other cancer nonprofit to advance cutting-edge research and cures for patients," said Louis J. DeGennaro, Ph.D., LLS's president and CEO. "Whether you fundraise through a campaign, support patients in your community, or advocate for state and federal policies to benefit patients, you are truly making a difference and helping LLS change the landscape of cancer." To learn how you can become part of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society family, contact the Greater Bay Area chapter at 415-625-1103 or go to lls.org/gba. The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society ® (LLS) is the world's largest voluntary health agency dedicated to blood cancer. The LLS mission: Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS funds lifesaving blood cancer research around the world, provides free information and support services, and is the voice for all blood cancer patients seeking access to quality, affordable, coordinated care. Founded in 1949 and headquartered in Rye Brook, NY, LLS has chapters throughout the United States and Canada. To learn more, visit www.LLS.org. Patients should contact the Information Resource Center at (800) 955-4572, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. ET. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/local-resident-receives-elite-volunteer-award-from-the-leukemia--lymphoma-society-300453597.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs) are a family of related blood cancers in which the individuals bone marrow makes too many red blood cells, white blood cells, or platelets. The most common forms of MPNs are polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), primary myelofibrosis (PMF) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Local cancer organizations have come together to help healthcare providers, patients, and families dealing with MPNs. The fourth annual Spring to Life Conference on Hematologic Malignancies, sponsored by New York Oncology Hematology, will be held at the Albany Marriott Hotel, Albany, NY on Saturday, May 20, 2017, from 7:30 am – 3:15 pm. This one-day CME-certified conference will bring together healthcare professionals and members of the community—including patients, survivors, family members, and caregivers—to gain an up-to-date understanding of blood cancers, including the state-of-the-art science behind treatment, clinical management, ongoing translational research, and emerging therapies. “Our Spring to Life conference each year highlights a different focus in the broad spectrum of hematologic malignancies or blood cancers and brings regional expertise to our community,” explains Ira Zackon, MD, New York Oncology Hematology and Conference Chair and Moderator. “Continued education at the local community level is critical to maintaining the highest quality and leading edge of health care. This year’s conference highlights this in particular, in focusing on less common diseases that do not get as much attention. Similarly, our afternoon session this year for patients, families, and community is focused on the Caregiver, the partner in health and life who also can receive less attention. These afternoon sessions continue to gain in reputation as meaningful and impactful engagements on living through the cancer experience.” The 2017 conference will focus on myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), including presentations from those touched by cancer; as well as experts from New York Oncology Hematology, PC (NYOH) Albany Medical College, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School. “At Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) our mission is to cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families," said Jennifer McGarry, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Director, Patient Access Volunteer Development. “The Spring To Life Conference on Hematologic Malignancies provides a wonderful opportunity for patients and caregivers to come together, share their experiences, and work together to improve care.” The event is divided into two, half-day sessions: The symposium is hosted by New York Oncology Hematology, the region’s largest provider of community cancer care. It is accredited by Center for Emergency Medical Education (CEME) for 3.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits ™. The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) will award 3.75 contact hours (based on a 60-minute contact hour) to registered nurses who complete the educational activity. Conference attendees will enjoy complimentary breakfast, light lunch, and snacks, as well as opportunities to view exhibitor displays. There is no fee for this educational activity. For more information or to register, visit: http://www.spring2lifeheme.org. About New York Oncology Hematology New York Oncology Hematology (NYOH) is the region’s leading provider of community-based cancer care and services. With seven convenient locations, a team of 36 physicians, and more than 300 oncology professionals, NYOH has been delivering world-class cancer care to the Capital Region and surrounding communities for more than 30 years. Through its affiliation with The US Oncology Network, one of the nation’s largest cancer treatment and research networks, NYOH offers the latest breakthroughs, treatments, and technologies – right here at home. About The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society ® (LLS) is the world’s largest voluntary health agency dedicated to blood cancer. The LLS mission: Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS funds lifesaving blood cancer research around the world and provides free information and support services. Founded in 1949 and headquartered in White Plains, NY, LLS has chapters throughout the United States and Canada. The Upstate NY/VT Chapter is located in Albany, NY.


Kelley Kronenberg’s Vicki Schuerger Competes in the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Man & Woman of the Year Fundraising Campaign Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 26, 2017 --( According to LLS, the Man & Woman of the Year (MWOY) campaign is a spirited fundraising competition in communities across the country in which participants build fundraising teams to compete for the title of Man or Woman of the Year. The funds raised will go toward LLS blood cancer research in honor of a local boy and girl who are blood cancer survivors. The titles are awarded to the man and woman in each community who raises the most funds during the ten-week campaign. You can support Ms. Schuerger by visiting her donation page here: http://www.mwoy.org/pages/sfl/ftl17/vschuerger Ms. Schuerger’s drive and motivation for this campaign is her 29-year-old son, who has been battling Hodgkin's Lymphoma for the past nine years. He has had two transplants and is currently preparing for thyroid cancer surgery. Ms. Schuerger began her volunteer work with LLS in 2008, first joining Team In Training (TNT) to honor her son. For nearly a decade, she has been extremely involved with LLS. Last August, she became the Co-Chair for the Broward Chapter of Team In Training Restructure Program. She is also a Board Member for the Broward County Chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. Prior to this fundraising campaign, Ms. Schuerger has raised more than $100,000 for LLS. This year, her goal is to surpass the $100,000 mark. “To be nominated for MWOY is such an honor. I feel very humbled to participate,” said Ms. Schuerger. “Everyone wins when cancer loses, and thanks to the support of my generous campaign donors my efforts will help fund the therapies and treatments that save lives, not someday, but today.” One such generous campaign supporter is Ms. Schuerger’s long-time employer, Kelley Kronenberg. Ms. Schuerger’s campaign for MWOY concludes at the 2017 MWOY Grand Finale on June 2, 2017 at the Marriott Harbor Beach Resort Fort Lauderdale. Kelley Kronenberg is a Bronze Level Sponsor at the Grand Finale event, and several firm Partners and Executive Leaders will be in attendance to support Ms. Schuerger as she vies for the MWOY crown. Kelley Kronenberg, a diverse, full-service business law firm, has always encouraged its attorneys’ and staffs’ individual community and charitable efforts. Additionally, the firm’s Kelley Kronenberg Cares (KKC) program provides opportunities for the firm’s attorneys and staff to personally commit to civic and charitable efforts. “We fully support Vicki in her passionate mission to help raise awareness and funds for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. We hope her efforts will inspire others to donate and get involved as well,” said Kelley Kronenberg CFO Heath Eskalyo, who directs the firm’s philanthropic efforts. To further aid Ms. Schuerger in her fundraising efforts, Kelley Kronenberg created a firm-wide “High $5 for Jeans Days” initiative. Through this weekly initiative, all firm employees across Kelley Kronenberg’s 10 offices, are encouraged to donate $5 weekly, in exchange for wearing jeans to work on Thursdays. The “High $5 for Jeans Day” program lasts through the month of May. The campaign is open now through June 2, 2017. LLS gives approximately 83 cents for every dollar raised back to research to cure cancer. About Kelley Kronenberg Kelley Kronenberg is a diverse, full-service business law firm that provides litigation and other legal services to established corporations, insurance companies, entrepreneurs and individuals in Florida and other regions of the U.S. More than 120 attorneys strong, the firm offers 25 distinct practice areas throughout its network of ten offices in Florida and Illinois. Founded in 1980, Kelley Kronenberg was built on relationships and continues to grow and excel because of its strength, offering sound legal counsel and exceptional client service. Kelley Kronenberg is ranked in the Top 25 Largest Law Firms in South Florida by the South Florida Business Journal, and has been recognized as a Top Law Firm in Florida by the South Florida Legal Guide and LexisNexis ® Martindale-Hubbell®. More information on practice areas and office locations is available at www.kelleykronenberg.com. Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 26, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Vicki Schuerger, an Executive Legal Liaison in Kelley Kronenberg’s Fort Lauderdale Office, was nominated by the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS), Southern Florida Chapter/Broward County, as a candidate for its 2017 Man & Woman of the Year Fundraising Campaign.According to LLS, the Man & Woman of the Year (MWOY) campaign is a spirited fundraising competition in communities across the country in which participants build fundraising teams to compete for the title of Man or Woman of the Year. The funds raised will go toward LLS blood cancer research in honor of a local boy and girl who are blood cancer survivors. The titles are awarded to the man and woman in each community who raises the most funds during the ten-week campaign. You can support Ms. Schuerger by visiting her donation page here: http://www.mwoy.org/pages/sfl/ftl17/vschuergerMs. Schuerger’s drive and motivation for this campaign is her 29-year-old son, who has been battling Hodgkin's Lymphoma for the past nine years. He has had two transplants and is currently preparing for thyroid cancer surgery. Ms. Schuerger began her volunteer work with LLS in 2008, first joining Team In Training (TNT) to honor her son. For nearly a decade, she has been extremely involved with LLS. Last August, she became the Co-Chair for the Broward Chapter of Team In Training Restructure Program. She is also a Board Member for the Broward County Chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. Prior to this fundraising campaign, Ms. Schuerger has raised more than $100,000 for LLS. This year, her goal is to surpass the $100,000 mark.“To be nominated for MWOY is such an honor. I feel very humbled to participate,” said Ms. Schuerger. “Everyone wins when cancer loses, and thanks to the support of my generous campaign donors my efforts will help fund the therapies and treatments that save lives, not someday, but today.”One such generous campaign supporter is Ms. Schuerger’s long-time employer, Kelley Kronenberg. Ms. Schuerger’s campaign for MWOY concludes at the 2017 MWOY Grand Finale on June 2, 2017 at the Marriott Harbor Beach Resort Fort Lauderdale. Kelley Kronenberg is a Bronze Level Sponsor at the Grand Finale event, and several firm Partners and Executive Leaders will be in attendance to support Ms. Schuerger as she vies for the MWOY crown.Kelley Kronenberg, a diverse, full-service business law firm, has always encouraged its attorneys’ and staffs’ individual community and charitable efforts. Additionally, the firm’s Kelley Kronenberg Cares (KKC) program provides opportunities for the firm’s attorneys and staff to personally commit to civic and charitable efforts.“We fully support Vicki in her passionate mission to help raise awareness and funds for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. We hope her efforts will inspire others to donate and get involved as well,” said Kelley Kronenberg CFO Heath Eskalyo, who directs the firm’s philanthropic efforts.To further aid Ms. Schuerger in her fundraising efforts, Kelley Kronenberg created a firm-wide “High $5 for Jeans Days” initiative. Through this weekly initiative, all firm employees across Kelley Kronenberg’s 10 offices, are encouraged to donate $5 weekly, in exchange for wearing jeans to work on Thursdays. The “High $5 for Jeans Day” program lasts through the month of May.The campaign is open now through June 2, 2017. LLS gives approximately 83 cents for every dollar raised back to research to cure cancer.About Kelley KronenbergKelley Kronenberg is a diverse, full-service business law firm that provides litigation and other legal services to established corporations, insurance companies, entrepreneurs and individuals in Florida and other regions of the U.S. More than 120 attorneys strong, the firm offers 25 distinct practice areas throughout its network of ten offices in Florida and Illinois. Founded in 1980, Kelley Kronenberg was built on relationships and continues to grow and excel because of its strength, offering sound legal counsel and exceptional client service. Kelley Kronenberg is ranked in the Top 25 Largest Law Firms in South Florida by the South Florida Business Journal, and has been recognized as a Top Law Firm in Florida by the South Florida Legal Guide and LexisNexis ® Martindale-Hubbell®. More information on practice areas and office locations is available at www.kelleykronenberg.com. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Kelley Kronenberg


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

When Marc Perrone, UFCW's international president, learned that the UFCW was the recipient of LLS's National Corporate Leadership Award, he was humbled. "The UFCW union family prides itself on giving back to the communities we call home and doing our part to bring hard working families a better life. We are honored to help The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society lead the way to a world without blood cancers. Our partnership is proof that the best way to make a difference is to stand together." The National Corporate Leadership Award honors an organization with fundamental alignment to LLS's goal to cure blood cancers and commitment to improving the lives of patients. Nominees for this award support and advance LLS through leadership, executive and employee involvement in various LLS volunteer driven initiatives, and through financially support for LLS's research, patient services and advocacy initiatives. "LLS is very proud of our partnership with the UFCW, whose members have supported LLS relentlessly by raising essential funds needed to fight blood cancer," said Louis J. DeGennaro, Ph.D., LLS's president and CEO. "The UFCW is helping LLS make it possible to accomplish more than any other cancer nonprofit to advance cutting-edge research and cures for patients." The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society ® (LLS) is the world's largest voluntary health agency dedicated to blood cancer. The LLS mission: Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS funds lifesaving blood cancer research around the world, provides free information and support services, and is the voice for all blood cancer patients seeking access to quality, affordable, coordinated care. Founded in 1949 and headquartered in Rye Brook, NY, LLS has chapters throughout the United States and Canada. To learn more, visit www.LLS.org. Patients should contact the Information Resource Center at (800) 955-4572, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. ET. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ufcw-receives-elite-volunteer-award-from-the-leukemia--lymphoma-society-300462408.html


PORTLAND, Ore., SAN DIEGO, and TORONTO, May 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) and  Aptose Biosciences Inc. (NASDAQ:APTO) (TSX:APS) announced the presentation of preclinical data demonstrating that CG’806, a highly potent pan-FLT3/BTK inhibitor, kills malignant cells in samples from patients with various hematologic malignancies. The data were presented in a poster on Sunday, May 7 at the 2017 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Conference Hematologic Malignancies: Translating Discoveries to Novel Therapies, held May 6-9 in Boston, MA. The poster, entitled CG’806, a First-in-Class FLT3/BTK Inhibitor, Exhibits Potent Activity against AML Patient Samples with Mutant or Wild-Type FLT3, as well as Other Hematologic Malignancy Subtypes, demonstrated the broad potency of CG’806 against various hematologic malignancy cell lines and patient primary bone marrow specimens. In addition, data for CG’806 indicated greater potency of CG’806 when compared to other non-proprietary competitive agents in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), including the bromodomain inhibitors OTX-015 and JQ-1, and the FLT3 inhibitor quizartinib. “The analyses of CG’806 against primary hematologic malignancy patient samples and cultured cell lines show evidence of potent and broad drug activity in AML and other disease subtypes and support further development of this agent for hematologic malignancies,” said Stephen E. Kurtz, Ph.D., lead author and Research Assistant Professor at the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute. "These findings further strengthen our commitment to develop CG’806 as a targeted treatment for AML and other hematologic malignancies," commented William G. Rice, Ph.D., Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Aptose. “We are actively preparing ’806 for clinical studies and look forward to filing an IND and taking the molecule into patients as soon as possible.” Through the Beat AML Initiative, primary patient mononuclear cells were derived from 82 patients diagnosed with AML. Primary samples were also collected from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN, n=15), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=17), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, n=58). Sensitivity to CG’806 was evaluated across a range of concentrations after a 72-hour treatment. IC values were calculated as a measure of drug sensitivity and compared to other agents. Across the four general subtypes of hematologic malignancies in the dataset, there was broad sensitivity to CG’806, with 59% (48/82) of AML, 29% (5/17) of ALL, 53% (8/15) of MDS/MPN, and 40% (23/58) of CLL cases exhibiting an IC of less than 100 nM. Primary AML and CLL cells were sensitive to CG’806 with median IC values of 70 nM and 220 nM, respectively. Among the 38 tested AML samples with known FLT3 mutational status, the FLT3-ITD+ AML samples tended to have enhanced sensitivity to CG’806 (median IC = 20 nM, n=8) relative to the FLT3-WT samples (median IC = 120 nM, n=30). CG’806 also exerted potent anti-proliferative activity against human AML, B-ALL, mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines. In comparison to the FLT3 inhibitor quizartinib, CG’806 completely inhibited phosphorylation of FLT3 and STAT5 in MV4-11 cells, whereas quizartinib only partially inhibited their phosphorylation. The presentation will be published in the AACR Hematologic Malignancies Conference Proceedings. The poster can also be accessed here or at the Publications & Presentations section of the Aptose website, www.aptose.com. CG’806 is a once-daily, oral, first-in-class pan-FLT3/BTK inhibitor. This small molecule demonstrates potent inhibition of mutant forms of FLT3 (including internal tandem duplication, or ITD, and mutations of the receptor tyrosine kinase domain and gatekeeper region), eliminates AML tumors in the absence of toxicity in murine xenograft models, and represents a potential best-in-class therapeutic for patients with FLT3-driven AML. Likewise, CG’806 demonstrates potent, non-covalent inhibition of the Cys481Ser mutant of the BTK enzyme, as well as other oncogenic kinases operative in B cell malignancies, suggesting CG’806 may be developed for CLL and MCL patients that are resistant/refractory/intolerant to covalent BTK inhibitors. The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and the Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) — joined by partnering medical institutions and industry collaborators — are performing groundbreaking research to better understand acute myeloid leukemia (AML).  Led by researchers at the Knight Cancer Institute, Beat AML collects samples from participating AML patients treated at 11 academic medical centers across the U.S. Knight Cancer Institute researchers conduct deep genomic sequencing analyses on those samples to create a profile of the possible genetic drivers of AML.  Researchers also test the sensitivity of patients' leukemic cells to a diverse panel of targeted therapies and novel combination regimens. The goal is to eventually match patients with treatments that precisely target their leukemia for durable remissions in AML. Aptose Biosciences is a clinical-stage biotechnology company committed to developing personalized therapies addressing unmet medical needs in oncology. Aptose is advancing new therapeutics focused on novel cellular targets on the leading edge of cancer. The company's small molecule cancer therapeutics pipeline includes products designed to provide single agent efficacy and to enhance the efficacy of other anti-cancer therapies and regimens without overlapping toxicities. For further information, please visit www.aptose.com. This press release may contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Canadian and U.S. securities laws, including, but not limited to, statements relating to the therapeutic potential of CG’806 and its clinical development as well as statements relating to Aptose’s plans, objectives, expectations and intentions and other statements including words such as “continue”, “expect”, “intend”, “will”, “should”, “would”, “may”, and other similar expressions. Such statements reflect our current views with respect to future events and are subject to risks and uncertainties and are necessarily based upon a number of estimates and assumptions that, while considered reasonable by us are inherently subject to significant business, economic, competitive, political and social uncertainties and contingencies. Many factors could cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements described in this press release. Such factors could include, among others: our ability to obtain the capital required for research and operations and to continue as a going concern; the inherent risks in early stage drug development including demonstrating efficacy; development time/cost and the regulatory approval process; the progress of our clinical trials; our ability to find and enter into agreements with potential partners; our ability to attract and retain key personnel; changing market conditions; inability of new manufacturers to produce acceptable batches of GMP in sufficient quantities; unexpected manufacturing defects; and other risks detailed from time-to-time in our ongoing quarterly filings, annual information forms, annual reports and annual filings with Canadian securities regulators and the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should the assumptions set out in the section entitled "Risk Factors" in our filings with Canadian securities regulators and the United States Securities and Exchange Commission underlying those forward-looking statements prove incorrect, actual results may vary materially from those described herein. These forward-looking statements are made as of the date of this press release and we do not intend, and do not assume any obligation, to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law. We cannot assure you that such statements will prove to be accurate as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Investors are cautioned that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and accordingly investors are cautioned not to put undue reliance on forward-looking statements due to the inherent uncertainty therein.


HOUSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Gexa Energy, a leading retail electricity provider in Texas, today announced that the company will be the presenting sponsor of this year’s Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS) Light The Night Walk in Houston, which will be held at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, October 28, at Minute Maid Park. Light The Night is a nation-wide walk that raises funds for lifesaving treatments, and celebrates and commemorates lives touched by blood cancers. Brian Landrum, president of Gexa Energy, has been named the corporate walk chair of the 2017 Houston Light The Night Walk. As chairman, Landrum leads the effort to cultivate corporate support and drive monetary donations for Light The Night to support LLS’s goal of creating a world without blood cancer. “It is an honor to be a part of this year’s Light The Night Walk and to partner with this amazing organization that makes such a meaningful impact on the lives of others,” said Landrum. “Leukemia and lymphoma have personally touched the lives of several Gexa Energy employees, and we are proud that we can help The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society continue its fight against these deadly diseases.” To continue its support of this organization, Gexa Energy has announced a new plan for residential customers that will directly benefit LLS. The company will donate $25 to LLS for every new residential customer who enrolls on the EveryDay | EveryNight® Low Price Plan 12, and $50 for enrollments on the EveryDay | EveryNight® Low Price Plan 24 using promo code HOPE. The EveryDay | EveryNight® Low Price Plan offers a low fixed rate for 12 or 24 months. Customers can sign up online or call (855) 639-8573 and mention promo code HOPE. For more information about how you can help Gexa Energy and LLS bring us closer to living in a world without blood cancers, visit: http://pages.lightthenight.org/txg/Houston17/gexaenergy. About Gexa Energy, LP (PUCT # 10027) Since entering the Texas deregulated energy market in 2002, Gexa Energy, LP has established itself as one of the leading retail electricity providers for residential and commercial customers in the state of Texas. Gexa Energy, LP is a subsidiary of NextEra Energy, Inc. (NYSE: NEE), a leading clean energy company. For additional information about Gexa Energy, visit www.GexaEnergy.com or call 866-961-9399. About The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society® (LLS) is the world's largest voluntary health agency dedicated to blood cancer. The LLS mission: Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS funds lifesaving blood cancer research around the world, provides free information and support services, and is the voice for all blood cancer patients seeking access to quality, affordable, coordinated care. Founded in 1949 and headquartered in Rye Brook, NY, LLS has chapters throughout the United States and Canada. To learn more, visit LLS.org. Patients should contact the Information Resource Center at (800) 955-4572, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. ET.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Rise Against Hunger (formerly Stop Hunger Now), an international hunger relief organization, announces two additions to senior management to support impact growth and global operations. Peggy Shriver has been named Chief Development Officer (CDO) and Larry Shepherd has been named as the organization’s first Chief Operating Officer (COO). Both executives join Rise Against Hunger to help meet the goal of ending hunger by the year 2030 and to support the organization’s projected growth. Rod Brooks, President & CEO, said, “We’ve developed an ambitious goal for our growth, to implement a program framework that includes dramatically expanding our meal packaging program to produce 1 billion meals, undertaking projects that increase local food production and access to food, and addressing hunger and poverty from its root causes for a sustainable end to hunger in our lifetime.” Rise Against Hunger’s volunteer-based meal packaging program, which provided life-changing meals to partner organizations in more than 30 countries in 2016, has expanded to engage more than 376,000 volunteers in 20 cities throughout the United States, as well as in five countries internationally. In 2016, Rise Against Hunger meals nourished more than 1 million lives around the world. Peggy Shriver to Lead Fundraising Initiatives Peggy Shriver brings 25 years of nonprofit management and fundraising experience to the organization. As Chief Development Officer, Shriver is responsible for overseeing fundraising operations to fund projects that increase food production and access to food for a sustainable end to hunger in our lifetime. Shriver was formerly Senior Director of the V Foundation, and has served in fundraising leadership positions at Easter Seals, Special Olympics and The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. She has raised more than $650 million for people with special needs, life-threatening diseases and underserved populations. Brooks noted, “Peggy Shriver has tremendous expertise in individual giving, corporate sponsorships, special events and cause-marketing promotions – experience that is invaluable to our efforts to engage donors in our mission to end hunger.” She is credited for leading the design and development of Easter Seals’ signature event “Walk With Me,” now executed nationwide, as well as piloting the American Dental Association’s national Bone Marrow Drive in the fight against blood cancer. Working with Special Olympics on a global level, she was actively involved in the Law Enforcement Torch Run coordinating fundraising campaigns with officers from 40 countries and culminating at the World Games. Shriver holds degrees in print journalism, broadcasting and marketing from Trinity University and is a certified fundraising executive. Retired Army Officer Larry Shepherd to Serve As Chief Operating Officer Larry Shepherd has been named Chief Operating Officer for Rise Against Hunger. Shepherd is responsible for leading global growth and managing operational and administrative aspects of the organization, including global operations, technology solutions and services, people operations, community engagement and process improvement. Shepherd is a retired Army Officer who brings 24 years of experience leading effective teams throughout the United States, Germany, Bosnia, Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan. During his military career, he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for distinguished service; led as many as 1,200 servicemen and women as a Deputy Brigade Commander; and was recognized as the #1 Deputy Director at the United States Military Academy at West Point. He is passionate about leadership development and mentorship and has coached youth football and baseball programs in his community. Shepherd holds a M.A. in military arts & science (leadership & strategy) from the U.S. Army Command and General Officer Staff College and a B.A. in political science from Central Washington University. He is an assistant professor at the United States Military Academy (USMA) and completed the two-year Master Teacher Certification Program, also offered at USMA. Rise Against Hunger (formerly Stop Hunger Now), an international hunger relief organization based in Raleigh, N.C., works to implement immediate and long-term solutions to hunger worldwide. With program locations in 20 U.S. cities and five international offices, Rise Against Hunger has engaged volunteers to package more than 320 million nutrient-rich meals for distribution to 74 countries around the globe. To find out more about Rise Against Hunger’s efforts to end hunger worldwide, please visit http://www.riseagainsthunger.org.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

SEATTLE - Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have developed biodegradable nanoparticles that can be used to genetically program immune cells to recognize and destroy cancer cells -- while the immune cells are still inside the body. In a proof-of-principle study to be published April 17 in Nature Nanotechnology, the team showed that nanoparticle-programmed immune cells, known as T cells, can rapidly clear or slow the progression of leukemia in a mouse model. "Our technology is the first that we know of to quickly program tumor-recognizing capabilities into T cells without extracting them for laboratory manipulation," said Fred Hutch's Dr. Matthias Stephan, the study's senior author. "The reprogrammed cells begin to work within 24 to 48 hours and continue to produce these receptors for weeks. This suggests that our technology has the potential to allow the immune system to quickly mount a strong enough response to destroy cancerous cells before the disease becomes fatal." Cellular immunotherapies have shown promise in clinical trials, but challenges remain to making them more widely available and to being able to deploy them quickly. At present, it typically takes a couple of weeks to prepare these treatments: the T cells must be removed from the patient and genetically engineered and grown in special cell processing facilities before they are infused back into the patient. These new nanoparticles could eliminate the need for such expensive and time consuming steps. Although his T-cell programming method is still several steps away from the clinic, Stephan imagines a future in which nanoparticles transform cell-based immunotherapies -- whether for cancer or infectious disease -- into an easily administered, off-the-shelf treatment that's available anywhere. "I've never had cancer, but if I did get a cancer diagnosis I would want to start treatment right away," Stephan said. "I want to make cellular immunotherapy a treatment option the day of diagnosis and have it able to be done in an outpatient setting near where people live." Stephan created his T-cell homing nanoparticles as a way to bring the power of cellular cancer immunotherapy to more people. In his method, the laborious, time-consuming T-cell programming steps all take place within the body, creating a potential army of "serial killers" within days. As reported in the new study, Stephan and his team developed biodegradable nanoparticles that turned T cells into CAR T cells, a particular type of cellular immunotherapy that has delivered promising results against leukemia in clinical trials. The researchers designed the nanoparticles to carry genes that encode for chimeric antigen receptors, or CARs, that target and eliminate cancer. They also tagged the nanoparticles with molecules that make them stick like burrs to T cells, which engulf the nanoparticles. The cell's internal traffic system then directs the nanoparticle to the nucleus, and it dissolves. The study provides proof-of-principle that the nanoparticles can educate the immune system to target cancer cells. Stephan and his team designed the new CAR genes to integrate into chromosomes housed in the nucleus, making it possible for T cells to begin decoding the new genes and producing CARs within just one or two days. Once the team determined that their CAR-carrying nanoparticles reprogrammed a noticeable percent of T cells, they tested their efficacy. Using a preclinical mouse model of leukemia, Stephan and his colleagues compared their nanoparticle-programming strategy against chemotherapy followed by an infusion of T cells programmed in the lab to express CARs, which mimics current CAR-T-cell therapy. The nanoparticle-programmed CAR-T cells held their own against the infused CAR-T cells. Treatment with nanoparticles or infused CAR-T cells improved survival 58 days on average, up from a median survival of about two weeks. The study was funded by Fred Hutch's Immunotherapy Initiative, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, the Phi Beta Psi Sorority, the National Science Foundation and the National Cancer Institute. Next steps and other applications Stephan's nanoparticles still have to clear several hurdles before they get close to human trials. He's pursuing new strategies to make the gene-delivery-and-expression system safe in people and working with companies that have the capacity to produce clinical-grade nanoparticles. Additionally, Stephan has turned his sights to treating solid tumors and is collaborating to this end with several research groups at Fred Hutch. And, he said, immunotherapy may be just the beginning. In theory, nanoparticles could be modified to serve the needs of patients whose immune systems need a boost, but who cannot wait for several months for a conventional vaccine to kick in. "We hope that this can be used for infectious diseases like hepatitis or HIV," Stephan said. This method may be a way to "provide patients with receptors they don't have in their own body," he explained. "You just need a tiny number of programmed T cells to protect against a virus." At Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, home to three Nobel laureates, interdisciplinary teams of world-renowned scientists seek new and innovative ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases. Fred Hutch's pioneering work in bone marrow transplantation led to the development of immunotherapy, which harnesses the power of the immune system to treat cancer. An independent, nonprofit research institute based in Seattle, Fred Hutch houses the nation's first cancer prevention research program, as well as the clinical coordinating center of the Women's Health Initiative and the international headquarters of the HIV Vaccine Trials Network. Private contributions are essential for enabling Fred Hutch scientists to explore novel research opportunities that lead to important medical breakthroughs. For more information visit fredhutch.org or follow Fred Hutch on Facebook, Twitter or YouTube.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: phys.org

In a proof-of-principle study to be published April 17 in Nature Nanotechnology, the team showed that nanoparticle-programmed immune cells, known as T cells, can rapidly clear or slow the progression of leukemia in a mouse model. "Our technology is the first that we know of to quickly program tumor-recognizing capabilities into T cells without extracting them for laboratory manipulation," said Fred Hutch's Dr. Matthias Stephan, the study's senior author. "The reprogrammed cells begin to work within 24 to 48 hours and continue to produce these receptors for weeks. This suggests that our technology has the potential to allow the immune system to quickly mount a strong enough response to destroy cancerous cells before the disease becomes fatal." Cellular immunotherapies have shown promise in clinical trials, but challenges remain to making them more widely available and to being able to deploy them quickly. At present, it typically takes a couple of weeks to prepare these treatments: the T cells must be removed from the patient and genetically engineered and grown in special cell processing facilities before they are infused back into the patient. These new nanoparticles could eliminate the need for such expensive and time consuming steps. Although his T-cell programming method is still several steps away from the clinic, Stephan imagines a future in which nanoparticles transform cell-based immunotherapies—whether for cancer or infectious disease—into an easily administered, off-the-shelf treatment that's available anywhere. "I've never had cancer, but if I did get a cancer diagnosis I would want to start treatment right away," Stephan said. "I want to make cellular immunotherapy a treatment option the day of diagnosis and have it able to be done in an outpatient setting near where people live." Stephan created his T-cell homing nanoparticles as a way to bring the power of cellular cancer immunotherapy to more people. In his method, the laborious, time-consuming T-cell programming steps all take place within the body, creating a potential army of "serial killers" within days. As reported in the new study, Stephan and his team developed biodegradable nanoparticles that turned T cells into CAR T cells, a particular type of cellular immunotherapy that has delivered promising results against leukemia in clinical trials. The researchers designed the nanoparticles to carry genes that encode for chimeric antigen receptors, or CARs, that target and eliminate cancer. They also tagged the nanoparticles with molecules that make them stick like burrs to T cells, which engulf the nanoparticles. The cell's internal traffic system then directs the nanoparticle to the nucleus, and it dissolves. The study provides proof-of-principle that the nanoparticles can educate the immune system to target cancer cells. Stephan and his team designed the new CAR genes to integrate into chromosomes housed in the nucleus, making it possible for T cells to begin decoding the new genes and producing CARs within just one or two days. Once the team determined that their CAR-carrying nanoparticles reprogrammed a noticeable percent of T cells, they tested their efficacy. Using a preclinical mouse model of leukemia, Stephan and his colleagues compared their nanoparticle-programming strategy against chemotherapy followed by an infusion of T cells programmed in the lab to express CARs, which mimics current CAR-T-cell therapy. The nanoparticle-programmed CAR-T cells held their own against the infused CAR-T cells. Treatment with nanoparticles or infused CAR-T cells improved survival 58 days on average, up from a median survival of about two weeks. The study was funded by Fred Hutch's Immunotherapy Initiative, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, the Phi Beta Psi Sorority, the National Science Foundation and the National Cancer Institute. Next steps and other applications Stephan's nanoparticles still have to clear several hurdles before they get close to human trials. He's pursuing new strategies to make the gene-delivery-and-expression system safe in people and working with companies that have the capacity to produce clinical-grade nanoparticles. Additionally, Stephan has turned his sights to treating solid tumors and is collaborating to this end with several research groups at Fred Hutch. And, he said, immunotherapy may be just the beginning. In theory, nanoparticles could be modified to serve the needs of patients whose immune systems need a boost, but who cannot wait for several months for a conventional vaccine to kick in. "We hope that this can be used for infectious diseases like hepatitis or HIV," Stephan said. This method may be a way to "provide patients with receptors they don't have in their own body," he explained. "You just need a tiny number of programmed T cells to protect against a virus." Explore further: Nanoparticle treatment could improve immunotherapy against cancer More information: In situ programming of leukaemia-specific T cells using synthetic DNA nanocarriers, Nature Nanotechnology (2017). nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/nnano.2017.57


Patent
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society | Date: 2013-03-08

A method is provided to associate an independent entity that collects financial instruments on behalf of an organization with funds collected on behalf of the organization. A system is also provided for associating an independent entity that collects financial instruments on behalf of an organization with funds collected on behalf of the organization. An apparatus may also be provided for associating an independent entity that collects financial instruments on behalf of an organization with funds collected on behalf of the organization.

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