Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Harare, Zimbabwe

Zinyama-Gutsire R.B.L.,University of Witwatersrand | Zinyama-Gutsire R.B.L.,Medical Research Council of Zimbabwe | Zinyama-Gutsire R.B.L.,Letten Research Foundation | Chasela C.,University of Witwatersrand | And 17 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Background Polymorphism in the MBL2 gene lead to MBL deficiency, which has been shown to increase susceptibility to various bacterial, viral and parasitic infections. We assessed role of MBL deficiency in HIV-1 and schistosoma infections in Zimbabwean adults enrolled in the Mupfure Schistosomiasis and HIV Cohort (MUSH Cohort). Methods HIV-1, S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections were determined at baseline. Plasma MBL concentration was measured by ELISA and MBL2 genotypes determined by PCR.We calculated and compared the proportions of plasma MBL deficiency, MBL2 structural variant alleles B (codon 54AG), C (codon 57AG), and D (codon 52TC) as well as MBL2 promoter variants -550(H/L), -221(X/Y) and +4(P/Q) between HIV-1 and schistosoma co-infection and control groups using Chi Square test. Results We assessed 379 adults, 80% females, median age (IQR) 30 (17-41) years. HIV-1, S. haematobium and S. mansoni prevalence were 26%, 43% and 18% respectively in the MUSH baseline survey. Median (IQR) plasma MBL concentration was 800g/L (192-1936 g/L). Prevalence of plasma MBL deficiency was 18% with high frequency of the C (codon 57GA) mutant allele (20%). There was no significant difference in median plasma MBL levels between HIV negative (912g/L) and HIV positive (688g/L), p = 0.066. However plasma MBL levels at the assay detection limit of 20g/L were more frequent among the HIV-1 infected (p = 0.007). S. haematobium and S. mansoni infected participants had significantly higher MBL levels than uninfected. All MBL2 variants were not associated with HIV-1 infection but promoter variants LY and LL were significantly associated with S. haematobium infection. Conclusion Our data indicate high prevalence of MBL deficiency, no evidence of association between MBL deficiency and HIV-1 infection. However, lower plasma MBL levels were protective against both S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections and MBL2 promoter and variants LY and LL increased susceptibility to S . haematobium infection. © 2015 Zinyama-Gutsire et al.


Zinyama-Gutsire R.B.L.,University of Witwatersrand | Zinyama-Gutsire R.B.L.,Medical Research Council of Zimbabwe | Zinyama-Gutsire R.B.L.,Letten Research Foundation | Chasela C.,University of Witwatersrand | And 15 more authors.
OMICS A Journal of Integrative Biology | Year: 2015

HIV infection remains a major global health burden since its discovery in 1983. Sub-Saharan Africa is the region hardest hit by the HIV/AIDS pandemic where 63% of the 33 million infected people live. While there is marked person-to-person variability in susceptibility, progression, and survival with HIV infection, there is a paucity of predictive diagnostics associated with these clinical endpoints. In this regard, the deficiency in plasma Mannose Binding Lectin (MBL) is a common opsonic defect reported to increase susceptibility infections, including HIV. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first study on the putative role of MBL deficiency on HIV progression and survival in an African adult population. We hypothesized that MBL deficiency has a role to play in HIV infection by increasing HIV disease progression and decreasing survival. We assessed the role of MBL deficiency on HIV disease progression and survival in a Zimbabwean adult population enrolled in the Mupfure Schistosomiasis and HIV (MUSH) cohort. We analyzed blood samples for MBL levels, MBL2 genotypes, HIV-1 status, viral load, and CD4+ T cell counts. Participants were followed for 3 years wherein the endpoints were measured at baseline, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Disease progression was measured as the rate of decline in CD4+ T cell counts and the rate of increase in HIV viral load. We assessed 197 HIV positive adults where 83% (164) were women with a median age of 31 years. Prevalence of plasma MBL deficiency (less than 100 μg/L) and MBL2 deficient genetic variants (A/O and O/O genotypes) was 21% (42 out of 197) and 39% (74 out of 190), respectively. We did not observe a significant role to explain individual variation in mortality, change of CD4+ T cell count, and viral load by MBL plasma deficiency or MBL2 genetic variants from baseline to 3 years follow up period in this adult population. We suggest the need for global OMICS research and that the present findings attest to the large between-population variability in a host of factors that can predispose individuals susceptible to HIV progression and mortality. We therefore cannot recommend at this time the use of plasma MBL levels or MBL2 genetic variants as a prognostic marker in HIV infection, disease progression, and survival in this adult population in Africa. © 2015, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

Discover hidden collaborations