Lesaffre Feed Additives

Marquette-lez-Lille, France

Lesaffre Feed Additives

Marquette-lez-Lille, France

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Pinloche E.,Aberystwyth University | McEwan N.,Aberystwyth University | Marden J.-P.,Lesaffre Feed Additives | Bayourthe C.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

It has been suggested that the ability of live yeast to improve milk yield and weight gain in cattle is because the yeast stimulates bacterial activity within the rumen. However it remains unclear if this is a general stimulation of all species or a specific stimulation of certain species. Here we characterised the change in the bacterial population within the rumen of cattle fed supplemental live yeast. Three cannulated lactating cows received a daily ration (24 kg/d) of corn silage (61% of DM), concentrates (30% of DM), dehydrated alfalfa (9% of DM) and a minerals and vitamins mix (1% of DM). The effect of yeast (BIOSAF SC 47, Lesaffre Feed Additives, France; 0.5 or 5 g/d) was compared to a control (no additive) in a 3×3 Latin square design. The variation in the rumen bacterial community between treatments was assessed using Serial Analysis of V1 Ribosomal Sequence Tag (SARST-V1) and 454 pyrosequencing based on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. Compared to the control diet supplementation of probiotic yeast maintained a healthy fermentation in the rumen of lactating cattle (higher VFA concentration [high yeast dose only], higher rumen pH, and lower Eh and lactate). These improvements were accompanied with a shift in the main fibrolytic group (Fibrobacter and Ruminococcus) and lactate utilising bacteria (Megasphaera and Selenomonas). In addition we have shown that the analysis of short V1 region of 16s rRNA gene (50-60 bp) could give as much phylogenetic information as a longer read (454 pyrosequencing of 250 bp). This study also highlights the difficulty of drawing conclusions on composition and diversity of complex microbiota because of the variation caused by the use of different methods (sequencing technology and/or analysis). © 2013 Pinloche et al.


Calvez J.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Calvez J.,Agro ParisTech | Fromentin G.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Fromentin G.,Agro ParisTech | And 11 more authors.
Physiology and Behavior | Year: 2011

Acute mild stress induces an inhibition of food intake in rats. In most studies, the cumulative daily food intake is measured but this only provides a quantitative assessment of ingestive behavior. The present study was designed to analyze the reduction in food intake induced by acute stress and to understand which behavioral and central mechanisms are responsible for it. Two different stressors, restraint stress (RS) and forced swimming stress (FSS), were applied acutely to male Wistar rats. We first measured corticosterone and ACTH in plasma samples collected immediately after acute RS and FSS in order to validate our stress models. We measured food intake after RS and FSS and determined meal patterns and behavioral satiety sequences. The expressions of CRF, NPY and POMC in the hypothalamus were also determined immediately after acute RS and FSS. The rise in corticosterone and ACTH levels after both acute RS and FSS validated our models. Furthermore, we showed that acute stress induced a reduction in cumulative food intake which lasted the whole day for RS but only for the first hour after FSS. For both stressors, this stress-induced food intake inhibition was explained by a decrease in meal size and duration, but there was no difference in ingestion speed. The behavioral satiety sequence was preserved after RS and FSS but grooming was markedly increased, which thus competed with, and could reduce, other behaviors, including eating. Lastly, we showed that RS induced an increase in hypothalamic POMC expression. These results suggest that acute stress may affect ingestive behavior by increasing satiation and to some extent by enhancing grooming, and this may be due to stimulation of the hypothalamic POMC neurons. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Fontagne-Dicharry S.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Godin S.,LCABIE UMR5254 | Liu H.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Liu H.,CAS Wuhan Institute of Hydrobiology | And 6 more authors.
British Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2015

Se is an essential micronutrient required for normal growth, development and antioxidant defence. The objective of the present study was to assess the impact of dietary Se sources and levels on the antioxidant status of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fry. First-feeding fry (initial body weight: 91 mg) were fed either a plant- or fishmeal-based diet containing 0·5 or 1·2 mg Se/kg diet supplemented or not with 0·3 mg Se/kg diet supplied as Se-enriched yeast or sodium selenite for 12 weeks at 17°C. Growth and survival of rainbow trout fry were not significantly affected by dietary Se sources and levels. Whole-body Se was raised by both Se sources and to a greater extent by Se-yeast. The reduced:oxidised glutathione ratio was raised by Se-yeast, whereas other lipid peroxidation markers were not affected by dietary Se. Whole-body Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity was enhanced in fish fed Se-yeast compared to fish fed sodium selenite or non-supplemented diets. Activity and gene expression of this enzyme as well as gene expression of selenoprotein P (SelP) were reduced in fish fed the non-supplemented plant-based diet. Catalase, glutamate-cysteine ligase and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene expressions were reduced by Se-yeast. These results suggest the necessity to supplement plant-based diets with Se for rainbow trout fry, and highlight the superiority of organic form of Se to fulfil the dietary Se requirement and sustain the antioxidant status of fish. GPX and SelP expression proved to be good markers of Se status in fish. Copyright © The Authors 2015.


Morales-Lopez R.,Center Mas Of Bover | Auclair E.,Lesaffre Feed Additives | Van Immerseel F.,Ghent University | Ducatelle R.,Ghent University | And 2 more authors.
British Poultry Science | Year: 2010

1. Three experiments were carried out to study the effects of two experimental yeast cell wall (YCW) supplements, one from the yeast extract industry and the other from the brewery industry, added to maize or wheat based-diets, on performance and intestinal parameters of broiler chickens (Ross 308). 2. In the first and second experiments, a completely randomised block design with 4 experimental treatments was used: T-1) Negative control, no additives T-2) Positive control, avilamycin group (10mg/kg feed), T-3) Yeast extract-YCW (500 mg/kg), and T-4) Brewery-YCW (500 mg/kg feed). There were 6 replicates of 20 (experiment 1) and 22 (experiment 2) chicks per treatment. 3. In experiment 1 (wheat based diets), yeast extract-YCW increased BW and daily feed intake (42 d). The effects were comparable to those of avilamycin. In experiment 2 (maize based diet), avilamycin, yeast extract-YCW and brewery-YCW treatments improved the feed conversion ratio with respect to the negative control group (0 to 14 d). 4. At 24 d, in both experiments, the ileal nutrient digestibility and ileal bacterial counts were not affected by any experimental treatment. In maize diets, lower intestinal viscosity was obtained with avilamycin, yeast extract-YCW and brewery-YCW than with the negative control. In wheat diets, yeast extract-YCW and brewery-YCW reduced intestinal viscosity. 5. A third experiment was conducted to study the effect of yeast extract-YCW on animal performance, intestinal mucosa morphology and intestinal viscosity. A 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used; one factor was the dietary yeast extract-YCW supplementation (0 or 500 mg/kg feed) and the other the cereal in the diet (maize or wheat). 6. At 43 d, the heaviest BW was in chickens fed on yeast extract-YCW compared to those given the negative control. At 22 d, yeast extract-YCW increased villus height, mucus thickness and number of goblet cells with respect to negative control. 7. Results of these experiments suggest that supplementation of yeast extract-YCW to broiler chicken diets increased animal performance by favouring intestinal mucosal development. © 2010 British Poultry Science Ltd.


Mathlouthi N.,Ecole Superieure dAgriculture du Kef | Ballet N.,Lesaffre Feed Additives | Larbier M.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research
International Journal of Poultry Science | Year: 2011

This study was performed with broiler chickens to evaluate the effects of adding beta-glucanase on bird performances and digestive organs weights. A total of 1600 1-day-old broilers (Arbor Acres) were divided into 2 groups and fed either a control diet (group C) based on corn, wheat and barley or a control diet supplemented with beta-glucanase preparation (Safizym GP 40, Lesaffre Feed Additives, France) at the dose of 40 mg per kg of diet (group G). Body weight, feed intake were recorded at 40 days of age. The same day, 8 chickens from each group were slaughtered for carcass yield and digestive organs weights. Experimental data were statistically analyzed by using the ANOVA procedure of Stat View programme. Throughout the whole trial period (1-40 days of age), body weight was significantly (p≤0.05) increased (+2.9%) in birds of group G (1723 g) compared to those of group C (1674 g). Moreover, there was no significant difference in feed intake between broilers consuming the control diet supplemented or not with beta-glucanase activity (4052 g). However, the feed conversion ratio was significantly reduced by 4% when the basal diet was supplemented with beta-glucanase (p≤0.05). The addition of beta-glucanase reduced (p<0.05) the small intestine weight related to the body weight compared to C group (5.40 vs.6.98%, respectively). Thus, it is possible to introduce in the broiler diet up to 35% of barley when beta-glucanase is used at the recommended dose of 40 mg per kg of diet. © Asian Network for Scientific Information, 2011.


PubMed | LCABIE UMR5254, French National Institute for Agricultural Research and Lesaffre Feed Additives
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The British journal of nutrition | Year: 2015

Se is an essential micronutrient required for normal growth, development and antioxidant defence. The objective of the present study was to assess the impact of dietary Se sources and levels on the antioxidant status of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fry. First-feeding fry (initial body weight: 91mg) were fed either a plant- or fishmeal-based diet containing 05 or 12mg Se/kg diet supplemented or not with 03mg Se/kg diet supplied as Se-enriched yeast or sodium selenite for 12 weeks at 17C. Growth and survival of rainbow trout fry were not significantly affected by dietary Se sources and levels. Whole-body Se was raised by both Se sources and to a greater extent by Se-yeast. The reduced:oxidised glutathione ratio was raised by Se-yeast, whereas other lipid peroxidation markers were not affected by dietary Se. Whole-body Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity was enhanced in fish fed Se-yeast compared to fish fed sodium selenite or non-supplemented diets. Activity and gene expression of this enzyme as well as gene expression of selenoprotein P (SelP) were reduced in fish fed the non-supplemented plant-based diet. Catalase, glutamate-cysteine ligase and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene expressions were reduced by Se-yeast. These results suggest the necessity to supplement plant-based diets with Se for rainbow trout fry, and highlight the superiority of organic form of Se to fulfil the dietary Se requirement and sustain the antioxidant status of fish. GPX and SelP expression proved to be good markers of Se status in fish.


Pinloche E.,Institute of Biological | Williams M.,Institute of Biological | D'Inca R.,Lesaffre Feed Additives | Auclair E.,Lesaffre Feed Additives | Newbold C.J.,Institute of Biological
Journal of Animal Science | Year: 2012

The impact of 2 doses of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated, 5 × 1010cfu/kg of feed (L1) and 5 × 1011cfu/kg of feed (L2) against a control (CON) with no added yeast, using an in vitro model [colon simulation technique (Cositec)] to mimic digestion in the pig colon. The L2 (but not L1) dose significantly improved DM digestibility compared to CON (61 v 58%) and increased NH3concentrations (+15%). Volatile fatty acid concentrations increased with L2 compared to CON-isobutyrate (+13.5%), propionate (+8.5%), isovalerate (+17.8%), and valerate (+25%)-but only valerate was increased with L1 (+14.2%). The analysis of microbiota from the liquid associated bacteria (LAB) and solid associated bacteria (SAB) revealed an interaction between the fraction and treatment (P < 0.05). Indeed, L2 had a significant impact on SAB and LAB (P < 0.01) whereas L1 only tended to change the structure of the population in the SAB (P < 0.1). Overall, this study showed that a live yeast probiotic could improve digestion in a colonic simulation model but only at the higher dose used and this effect was associated with a shift in the bacterial population therein. © 2012 American Society of Animal Science. All rights reserved.


Sanchez N.C.B.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Young T.R.,Texas Tech University | Carroll J.A.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Corley J.R.,Lesaffre Feed Additives | And 2 more authors.
Innate Immunity | Year: 2014

This study examined the effect of feeding yeast cell wall (YCW) products on the metabolic responses of newly-received feedlot cattle to an endotoxin challenge. Heifers were separated into treatment groups receiving either a Control diet, YCW-A or YCW-C, and were fed for 52 d. Heifers were weighed on d 0, 14, 36, 38 and 52. On d 37 heifers were challenged i.v. with LPS [0.5 μg/kg body weight (BW)] and blood samples were collected relative to LPS challenge. Heifer BW increased from d 0 to 36 and from d 38 to 52, but was not affected by treatment. Post-LPS, glucose concentrations increased and were less in YCW-A than Control and YCW-C heifers. Pre-LPS, insulin concentrations were greater in YCW-A and YCW-C than Control heifers. Post-LPS, insulin concentrations increased with YCW-C having greater insulin than Control heifers. Pre-LPS, NEFA concentrations tended to be less in YCW-C than Control heifers. Post-LPS non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations were less in YCW-C than Control and YCW-A heifers. Post-LPS, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentrations were greater in YCW-A than Control and YCW-C. These data indicate, based on NEFA and BUN data, that certain YCW products can enhance energy metabolism during an immune challenge without causing lipolysis or muscle catabolism. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.


Joannis-Cassan C.,Institut Universitaire de France | Tozlovanu M.,Institut Universitaire de France | Hadjeba-Medjdoub K.,Institut Universitaire de France | Ballet N.,Lesaffre Feed Additives | Pfohl-Leszkowicz A.,Institut Universitaire de France
Journal of Food Protection | Year: 2011

A methodology was developed to quantify the efficiency of yeast-based products for adsorption of three mycotoxins: zearalenone (ZEA), aflatoxin B1 (AFB 1), and ochratoxin A (OTA). Eight products were tested (yeast cell wall or inactivated yeast). The described experimental protocol based on in vitro tests provided reliable isotherms for each mycotoxin. The most suitable models were the Hill model for ZEA, the Langmuir model for AFB1, and the Freundlich model for OTA. From these models, original mathematical affinity criteria were defined to quantify the product adsorption performances for each mycotoxin. The best yeast product, a yeast cell wall from baker's yeast, can adsorb up to 68% of ZEA, 29% of AFB1, and 62% of OTA, depending on the mycotoxin concentrations. The adsorption capacity largely depended both on yeast composition and mycotoxin, but no direct correlation between yeast composition and adsorption capacity was found, confirming that adsorption of mycotoxin on yeast-based products involves complex phenomena. The results of this study are useful for comparing the adsorption efficiency of various yeast products and understanding the mechanisms involved in adsorption. © International Association for Food Protection.


Sanchez N.C.B.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Young T.R.,Texas Tech University | Carroll J.A.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Corley J.R.,Lesaffre Feed Additives | And 2 more authors.
Innate Immunity | Year: 2013

A study was conducted to determine the effect of feeding yeast cell wall (YCW) products on the physiological and acute phase responses of crossbred, newly-received feedlot heifers to an endotoxin challenge. Heifers (n = 24; 219 ± 2.4 kg) were separated into treatment groups receiving either a control diet (n = 8), YCW-A (2.5 g/heifer/d; n = 8) or YCW-C (2.5 g/heifer/d; n = 8) and were fed for 52 d. On d 37 heifers were challenged i.v. with LPS (0.5 μg/kg body mass) and blood samples were collected from -2 h to 8 h and again at 24 h relative to LPS challenge. There was an increase in vaginal temperature in all heifers post-LPS, with YCW-C maintaining a lower vaginal temperature post-LPS than control and YCW-A heifers. Sickness behavior scores increased post-LPS in all heifers, but were not affected by treatment. Cortisol concentrations were greatest in control heifers post-LPS compared with YCW-A or YCW-C heifers. Concentrations of IFN-γ and TNF-α increased post-LPS, but were not affected by treatment. Serum IL-6 concentrations increased post-LPS and were greater in control heifers than YCW-A and YCW-C heifers. These data indicate that YCW supplementation can decrease the physiological and acute phase responses of newly-received heifers following an endotoxin challenge. © The Author(s) 2012 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/ journalsPermissions.nav.

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