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Marquette-lez-Lille, France

Fontagne-Dicharry S.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Godin S.,LCABIE UMR5254 | Liu H.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Liu H.,CAS Wuhan Institute of Hydrobiology | And 6 more authors.
British Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2015

Se is an essential micronutrient required for normal growth, development and antioxidant defence. The objective of the present study was to assess the impact of dietary Se sources and levels on the antioxidant status of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fry. First-feeding fry (initial body weight: 91 mg) were fed either a plant- or fishmeal-based diet containing 0·5 or 1·2 mg Se/kg diet supplemented or not with 0·3 mg Se/kg diet supplied as Se-enriched yeast or sodium selenite for 12 weeks at 17°C. Growth and survival of rainbow trout fry were not significantly affected by dietary Se sources and levels. Whole-body Se was raised by both Se sources and to a greater extent by Se-yeast. The reduced:oxidised glutathione ratio was raised by Se-yeast, whereas other lipid peroxidation markers were not affected by dietary Se. Whole-body Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity was enhanced in fish fed Se-yeast compared to fish fed sodium selenite or non-supplemented diets. Activity and gene expression of this enzyme as well as gene expression of selenoprotein P (SelP) were reduced in fish fed the non-supplemented plant-based diet. Catalase, glutamate-cysteine ligase and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene expressions were reduced by Se-yeast. These results suggest the necessity to supplement plant-based diets with Se for rainbow trout fry, and highlight the superiority of organic form of Se to fulfil the dietary Se requirement and sustain the antioxidant status of fish. GPX and SelP expression proved to be good markers of Se status in fish. Copyright © The Authors 2015. Source


Mathlouthi N.,Ecole Superieure dAgriculture du Kef | Auclair E.,Lesaffre Feed Additives | Larbier M.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research
Livestock Research for Rural Development | Year: 2012

The present study aims to evaluate the effectiveness in broiler chicken of the yeast cell walls obtained after cytoplasm extraction, acidification and drying. A total of seven hundred and fifty 1-day-old male broilers were assigned to 6 treatments: the basal diet (T), the basal diet supplemented with either Avilamycine (AB) or yeast cell walls dried by atomisation and used at two rates: 500 or 1000 mg/kg of diet (PAB and PAH, respectively) or dried by hot cylinder and incorporated at two levels: 500 or 1000 mg/kg of diet (PCB and PCH, respectively).Throughout the trial period (1 - 42 days), the body weight (p < 0.01) of chickens fed T diet which was 2.130 kg was increased by 116 g (+5.4%) when the chicken fed PCB diet. The Avilamycine addition improved body weight of chicken by 6.2 % compared to T diet. The feed: gain ratio recorded in chickens fed T diet was 1.974. AB and PCB diets improved feed: gain ratio by 7.1 % and 9.3 to 10 %, respectively compared to control treatment. Growth performances of broiler chickens obtained with yeast cell wall dried by atomisation were smaller than those dried by hot cylinder. The effects of yeast cell wall doses (500 or 1000 mg/kg of diet) on body weight or weight gain was not significant. Moreover, yeast cell wall (PCB group) and Avilamycine addition in the diet reduced mortality rate (0.8 %) compared to T (6.4 %). In conclusion, the yeast cell walls can substitute growth promoter antibiotics because they allow the same performances in broiler chickens. Furthermore, it is important to specify the mechanisms of action of yeast cell walls. Source


Sanchez N.C.B.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Young T.R.,Texas Tech University | Carroll J.A.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Corley J.R.,Lesaffre Feed Additives | And 2 more authors.
Innate Immunity | Year: 2014

This study examined the effect of feeding yeast cell wall (YCW) products on the metabolic responses of newly-received feedlot cattle to an endotoxin challenge. Heifers were separated into treatment groups receiving either a Control diet, YCW-A or YCW-C, and were fed for 52 d. Heifers were weighed on d 0, 14, 36, 38 and 52. On d 37 heifers were challenged i.v. with LPS [0.5 μg/kg body weight (BW)] and blood samples were collected relative to LPS challenge. Heifer BW increased from d 0 to 36 and from d 38 to 52, but was not affected by treatment. Post-LPS, glucose concentrations increased and were less in YCW-A than Control and YCW-C heifers. Pre-LPS, insulin concentrations were greater in YCW-A and YCW-C than Control heifers. Post-LPS, insulin concentrations increased with YCW-C having greater insulin than Control heifers. Pre-LPS, NEFA concentrations tended to be less in YCW-C than Control heifers. Post-LPS non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations were less in YCW-C than Control and YCW-A heifers. Post-LPS, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentrations were greater in YCW-A than Control and YCW-C. These data indicate, based on NEFA and BUN data, that certain YCW products can enhance energy metabolism during an immune challenge without causing lipolysis or muscle catabolism. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav. Source


Joannis-Cassan C.,Institut Universitaire de France | Tozlovanu M.,Institut Universitaire de France | Hadjeba-Medjdoub K.,Institut Universitaire de France | Ballet N.,Lesaffre Feed Additives | Pfohl-Leszkowicz A.,Institut Universitaire de France
Journal of Food Protection | Year: 2011

A methodology was developed to quantify the efficiency of yeast-based products for adsorption of three mycotoxins: zearalenone (ZEA), aflatoxin B1 (AFB 1), and ochratoxin A (OTA). Eight products were tested (yeast cell wall or inactivated yeast). The described experimental protocol based on in vitro tests provided reliable isotherms for each mycotoxin. The most suitable models were the Hill model for ZEA, the Langmuir model for AFB1, and the Freundlich model for OTA. From these models, original mathematical affinity criteria were defined to quantify the product adsorption performances for each mycotoxin. The best yeast product, a yeast cell wall from baker's yeast, can adsorb up to 68% of ZEA, 29% of AFB1, and 62% of OTA, depending on the mycotoxin concentrations. The adsorption capacity largely depended both on yeast composition and mycotoxin, but no direct correlation between yeast composition and adsorption capacity was found, confirming that adsorption of mycotoxin on yeast-based products involves complex phenomena. The results of this study are useful for comparing the adsorption efficiency of various yeast products and understanding the mechanisms involved in adsorption. © International Association for Food Protection. Source


Sanchez N.C.B.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Young T.R.,Texas Tech University | Carroll J.A.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Corley J.R.,Lesaffre Feed Additives | And 2 more authors.
Innate Immunity | Year: 2013

A study was conducted to determine the effect of feeding yeast cell wall (YCW) products on the physiological and acute phase responses of crossbred, newly-received feedlot heifers to an endotoxin challenge. Heifers (n = 24; 219 ± 2.4 kg) were separated into treatment groups receiving either a control diet (n = 8), YCW-A (2.5 g/heifer/d; n = 8) or YCW-C (2.5 g/heifer/d; n = 8) and were fed for 52 d. On d 37 heifers were challenged i.v. with LPS (0.5 μg/kg body mass) and blood samples were collected from -2 h to 8 h and again at 24 h relative to LPS challenge. There was an increase in vaginal temperature in all heifers post-LPS, with YCW-C maintaining a lower vaginal temperature post-LPS than control and YCW-A heifers. Sickness behavior scores increased post-LPS in all heifers, but were not affected by treatment. Cortisol concentrations were greatest in control heifers post-LPS compared with YCW-A or YCW-C heifers. Concentrations of IFN-γ and TNF-α increased post-LPS, but were not affected by treatment. Serum IL-6 concentrations increased post-LPS and were greater in control heifers than YCW-A and YCW-C heifers. These data indicate that YCW supplementation can decrease the physiological and acute phase responses of newly-received heifers following an endotoxin challenge. © The Author(s) 2012 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/ journalsPermissions.nav. Source

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