Leroux SAS

Orchies, France

Leroux SAS

Orchies, France

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Loaec G.,Polytechnic Institute of LaSalle Beauvais | Niquet-Leridon C.,Polytechnic Institute of LaSalle Beauvais | Henry N.,Florimond Desprez | Jacolot P.,Polytechnic Institute of LaSalle Beauvais | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2015

During the heat treatment of coffee and its substitutes some compounds potentially deleterious to health are synthesized by the Maillard reaction. Among these, Nε-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) was detected at high levels in coffee substitutes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of changes in agricultural practice on the lysine content present in chicory roots and try to limit CML formation during roasting. Of the 24 varieties analyzed, small variations in lysine content were observed, 213 ± 8 mg/100 g dry matter (DM). The formation of lysine tested in five commercial varieties was affected by the nitrogen treatment with mean levels of 176 ± 2 mg/100 g DM when no fertilizer was added and 217 ± 7 mg/100 g DM with a nitrogen supply of 120 kg/ha. The lysine content of fresh roots was significantly correlated to the concentration of CML formed in roasted roots (r = 0.51; p < 0.0001; n = 76). © 2015 American Chemical Society.


Ripoll C.,Naturalpha SAS | Flourie B.,Center Hospitalier Lyon Sud | Megnien S.,Naturalpha SAS | Hermand O.,Leroux SAS | Janssens M.,Leroux SAS
Nutrition | Year: 2010

Objectives: We aimed to assess in healthy subjects 1) the effect of two doses of a new naturally inulin-rich soluble chicory extract (IRSCE) on overall gastrointestinal discomfort after short-term ingestion and 2) the effect on gastrointestinal symptoms of long-term consumption of IRSCE administered at a dose compatible with its future commercial use. Methods: First, the effect of IRSCE was assessed on overall gastrointestinal discomfort in a double-blind, crossover study where 18 subjects received in a randomized order a morning coffee drink including 10 g of sucrose alone (control period) or with IRSCE at two doses (8.9 and 14.0 g containing 5.0 and 7.8 g of inulin, respectively) during three consecutive 6-d periods. Second, 35 subjects were followed during a randomized, double-blind protocol where they were asked to take twice a day an instant coffee drink containing IRSCE (8.1 g/d containing inulin 5.0 g/d) or sucrose 8.1 g/d during 4 wk. The effects of the treatment on flatulence, bloating, abdominal pain, stool consistency, and number were recorded. Results: In the first study a significant slight increase (P = 0.05) in overall abdominal discomfort was observed with the morning coffee drink containing 7.8 g of inulin after 1 wk of consumption. In the second study, no significant differences between the IRSCE and placebo groups were evidenced with respect to gastrointestinal symptoms during the consumption period. Conclusion: Short- and long-term consumptions of IRSCE, given at a daily dose containing 5 g of inulin, are well tolerated by healthy subjects. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Loaec G.,Polytechnic Institute of LaSalle Beauvais | Niquet-Leridon C.,Polytechnic Institute of LaSalle Beauvais | Henry N.,Florimond Desprez | Jacolot P.,Polytechnic Institute of LaSalle Beauvais | And 8 more authors.
Food Research International | Year: 2014

Most thermally processed foods are affected by the Maillard reaction which leads to the formation of not only desired flavor and aroma compounds but also neoformed contaminants with probable unwanted biological effects. Among the latter, acrylamide was found to be formed from free asparagine in plant foods such as potatoes, cereals and coffee. Roasted chicory which is used as a common coffee substitute is also known to be high in acrylamide and indicative values have been proposed for this food category by the European Commission. The current study is aimed at understanding the impact of varietal selection and agronomic practices on the concentration of free asparagine, a major acrylamide precursor, in chicory roots, and the effect of these parameters on the amount of acrylamide in roasted chicory. The study showed that the concentration of free asparagine in raw chicory roots was variety- and year-dependent (from 444 to 2786. mg/kg). All five varieties tested showed an increase in free asparagine level in response to increased nitrogen application. The duration of chicory cultivation and the date of harvest had limited effects which need to be further understood. The drying process reduced free asparagine concentration in chicory roots without generating acrylamide. Overall the reduction of free asparagine in the raw chicory roots tested in this study led to a significant decrease in acrylamide formation in the roasted chicory (from 11097 to 2249. μg/kg). This positive correlation does not exclude the possibility that other factors such as those related to roasting conditions could be involved in the acrylamide formation. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Polytechnic Institute of LaSalle Beauvais, Leroux SAS, Institut Universitaire de France and Florimond Desprez
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of agricultural and food chemistry | Year: 2015

During the heat treatment of coffee and its substitutes some compounds potentially deleterious to health are synthesized by the Maillard reaction. Among these, N()-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) was detected at high levels in coffee substitutes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of changes in agricultural practice on the lysine content present in chicory roots and try to limit CML formation during roasting. Of the 24 varieties analyzed, small variations in lysine content were observed, 213 8 mg/100 g dry matter (DM). The formation of lysine tested in five commercial varieties was affected by the nitrogen treatment with mean levels of 176 2 mg/100 g DM when no fertilizer was added and 217 7 mg/100 g DM with a nitrogen supply of 120 kg/ha. The lysine content of fresh roots was significantly correlated to the concentration of CML formed in roasted roots (r = 0.51; p < 0.0001; n = 76).

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