Leon Institute of Technology

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Leon, Mexico
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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-2-4-05 | Award Amount: 6.75M | Year: 2009

Food Safety Objectives (FSO) and Performance Objectives (PO) are new criteria complementing the existing concepts of microbiological criteria and MRL for many chemical contaminants. However, to achieve these objectives it is critically important a harmonisation of food safety control procedures. BASELINE project intends to obtain the following objectives: 1) To review the sampling schemes currently available for food authorities and food producers to perform food safety quantitative risk assessment in a European level; 2) To assess the relevance and suitable limit values of POs and FSOs for biological and chemical risks; 3) To evaluate the need for new or adapted methods for sampling and testing of the risk factors identified. The selected protocols and methods should be able to produce suitable data for risk analysis; 4) To develop predictive mathematical models for biological risks and investigate and model sources and pathways of chemical contaminants to improve sampling schemes; 5) To validate and harmonise the sampling schemes developed in the project and alternative detection methods; 6) To share and disseminate the scientific knowledge deriving from the project to stakeholders. The BASELINE work plan has been divided in 9 work packages: WP1- management, WP2-WP6 sampling protocols for specific food matrixes, WP7-risk modelling, WP8-validation and harmonisation of sampling protocols, WP9-dissemination and training. The major output of the project is to generate new knowledge on sampling schemes for risk assessment by using a mathematical approach for different groups of food products as seafood, eggs and egg products, fresh meats, milk and dairy products and plant products. The project results will be translated in clear recommendations to the EC and end users and they will have a significant impact on protecting human and veterinary health.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME-AG | Phase: SME-2 | Award Amount: 2.04M | Year: 2009

About 65% of the worlds wine production is managed by European winegrowers. Wine production in Europe is traditionally performed by small and medium sized, family owned companies and co-operatives. Solid and liquid residues are not treated in an appropriate way what has a serious impact on the environment. Wine production is known to produce high amounts of wastewater with sometimes extremely high organic loads (COD 2.500-67.000 mg/L). This leads to shock loads to municipal wastewater treatment plants or to serious impacts on rivers and lakes, in case the vineyard is not connected to a sever system at all. In addition, solid residues are also not handled properly, being in many cases deposited in vineyards as compost or fertilizer, whose degradation leads to odour formation and ground water contamination and infectious diseases. These treatment systems have been proven to be ineffective in complying with the legislative environmental requirements, disposal regulations, and safety restrictions for solid re-use. Moreover, the tremendous potential of the remaining high-value, biologically active substances and valorisation activities are generally unused or unknown. In addition, environmental legislations and quality regulations become stricter and force vineyards to take measures to improve the environmental situation in wine production. The associations are aware of this situation and want to initiate necessary R&D activities to offer technical assistance to their member SMEs. To cope with this challenge the wine producers need technnical support. Therefore SUSTAVINO intends to help the European wine producers, to meet environmental regulations by providing an Environmental Quality Strategy for Sustainable Wine production (EQSW), which will encompass integrated approaches for treating and valorising wastes in a cost-effective and ecological way, and carrying out comprehensive training and capacity building to the SMEs and SME-AGs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2007-2-4-03 | Award Amount: 3.87M | Year: 2008

The concept of VITAL is the integrated monitoring and control of contamination of the European food supply chain by pathogenic viruses. VITAL will use advanced methods for virus detection throughout selected food supply chains from farm to market, to gather data on virus contamination of food and environmental sources suitable for quantitative viral risk assessment. Supply chains will be monitored for the presence of indicator viruses commonly found in faecal contamination events. These viruses can be distinguished into strains of human and animal origin, which will indicate contamination from a specific source. Modelling tools will be developed to define the quantitative viral risk for each scenario, and to assess foodborne viral risks for determining high risk situations and efficacy of interventions. Modular process risk models will be developed to build up specific HACCP recommendations. Recent developments in risk management will be evaluated for their use in reducing foodborne viral infections. Survival of viruses in foods will be modelled, and disinfection procedures used in the food industry will be evaluated, to elucidate the critical points where virus contamination may be controlled. VITAL will disseminate its findings by producing handbooks and guidelines on appropriate control practices, and communicate requirements necessary for establishing reliable monitoring of food chains for viruses on a regular or as-needed basis. Therefore VITAL will provide to Europe a framework for monitoring, risk modelling, and procedures for control of foodborne virus contamination, which will be applicable to any virus, whether existing, emerging or re-emerging, that poses the danger of being transmitted by food. Implementation of such a framework of preventive or proactive virus contamination management will form a first line of defence against transmission of foodborne viral diseases in Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-11-2015 | Award Amount: 5.99M | Year: 2016

WASTE2FUELS aims to develop next generation biofuel technologies capable of converting agrofood waste (AFW) streams into high quality biobutanol. Butanol is one of the most promising biofuels due to its superior fuel properties compared to current main biofuels, bioethanol and biodiesel. In addition to its ability to reduce carbon emissions, its higher energy content (almost 30% more than ethanol), its ability to blend with both gasoline and diesel, its lower risk of separation and corrosion, its resistance to water absorption, allowing it to be transported in pipes and carriers used by gasoline, it offers a very exciting advantage for adoption as engines require almost no modifications to use it. The main WASTE2FUELS innovations include: Development of novel pretreatment methods for converting AFW to an appropriate feedstock for biobutanol production thus dramatically enlarging current available biomass for biofuels production Genetically modified microorganisms for enhancing conversion efficiencies of the biobutanol fermentation process Coupled recovery and biofilm reactor systems for enhancing conversion efficiencies of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol fermentation Development of new routes for biobutanol production via ethanol catalytic conversion Biobutanol engine tests and ecotoxicological assessment of the produced biobutanol Valorisation of the process by-products Development of an integrated model to optimise the waste-to-biofuel conversion and facilitate the industrial scale-up Process fingerprint analysis by environmental and techno-economic assessment Biomass supply chain study and design of a waste management strategy for rural development By valorising 50% of the unavoidable and undervalorised AFW as feedstock for biobutanol production, WASTE2FUELS could divert up to 45 M tonnes of food waste from EU landfills, preventing 18 M tonnes of GHG and saving almost 0.5 billion litres of fossil fuels.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: WASTE-7-2015 | Award Amount: 7.65M | Year: 2016

Continuing population and consumption growth are driving global food demand, with agricultural activity increasing to keep pace. Europe has a major agricultural waste problem, generating some 700 million tonnes of waste annually. There is an urgent need and huge opportunity to address the efficient use of agricultural wastes, co-products and by-products (AWCB) towards delivering sustainable value chains in the farming and processing sectors. As such, AgroCycle will convert low value agricultural waste into highly valuable products, achieving a 10% increase in waste recycling and valorisation by 2020. This will be achieved by developing a detailed and holistic understanding of the waste streams and piloting a key number of waste utilisation/valorisation pathways. It will bring technologies and systems from ~TRL4 to ~TRL7 within the 3 years of the project. A post-project commercialisation plan will bring commercially promising technologies/systems to TRL8 and TRL9, ensuring AgroCycle will have an enduring impact by achieving sustainable use of AWCB both inside and outside the agricultural sector, leading to the realisation of a Circular Economy. AgroCycle addresses wastes from several agricultural sectors: wine, olive oil, horticulture, fruit, grassland, swine, dairy and poultry. The AgroCycle consortium is a large (25) multi-national group (including China) comprising the necessary and relevant multi-actors (i.e. researchers; companies in the technical, manufacturing, advisory, retail sectors (Large and SMEs); lead users; end users; and trade/producer associations) for achieving the projects ambitions goals. Farmings unique regional (rural) location means that AgroCycle will help reduce the EUs Innovation Divide and address the Regional Smart Specialisation Strategies for each partner country: impact will be Regional with National and International dimensions. The presence of three partners from China ensures international synergies and a global impact.


Rodriguez-Lazaro D.,University of Burgos | Cook N.,UK Environment Agency | Hernandez M.,Leon Institute of Technology
Current Issues in Molecular Biology | Year: 2013

A principal consumer demand is a guarantee of the safety and quality of food. The presence of foodborne pathogens and their potential hazard, the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production, and the correct labelling in foods suitable for vegetarians are among the subjects where society demands total transparency. The application of controls within the quality assessment programmes of the food industry is a way to satisfy these demands, and is necessary to ensure efficient analytical methodologies are possessed and correctly applied by the Food Sector. The use of real-time PCR has become a promising alternative approach in food diagnostics. It possesses a number of advantages over conventional culturing approaches, including rapidity, excellent analytical sensitivity and selectivity, and potential for quantification. However, the use of expensive equipment and reagents, the need for qualified personnel, and the lack of standardized protocols are impairing its practical implementation for food monitoring and control.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EO-3-2016 | Award Amount: 1.85M | Year: 2016

In the emerging Copernicus Earth monitoring era, Europe provides Earth Observation (EO) data from Sentinel-1 (S1) and Sentinel-2 (S2) on a free and open data policy basis. In response of the EO Work programme EO-3-2016: Evaluation of Copernicus Services, Sentinels Synergy for Agriculture (SENSAGRI) aims to exploit the unprecedented capacity of S1 and S2 to develop an innovative portfolio of prototypes agricultural monitoring services. When used alone either optical or radar sensors allow the mapping of crop types. However more robust, accurate, frequently updated and comprehensive crop maps are expected from the seldom exploited synergy of both types of measurements. The same holds when dealing with crop status, health and stresses. Experimental studies have demonstrated that fusion of optical and radar data opens up prospects for enhanced monitoring capabilities. SENSAGRI will exploit the synergy of optical and radar measurements to develop three prototype services capable of near real time operations: (1) surface soil moisture (SSM), (2) green and brown leaf area index (LAI) and (3) crop type mapping. These prototypes shall provide a baseline for advanced services that can boost the competitiveness of the European agro-industrial sector. SENSAGRI proposes four advanced proof-of-concept services: (i) yield/biomass, (ii) tillage change, (iii) irrigation and (iv) advanced crop maps. The algorithms will be developed and validated in four European agricultural test areas in Spain, France, Italy and Poland, which are representative of the European crop diversity, and their usefulness demonstrated in at least two non-European countries. In order to refine the specifications of the products and to iteratively assess the services, actors of the agricultural sector will be involved using a Living Lab approach. The combination of user-centered approach and of state-of-the-art algorithms will establish a sound foundation for deciding of a new Copernicus land service.


Rodriguez-Lazaro D.,University of Burgos | Hernandez M.,Leon Institute of Technology
Current Issues in Molecular Biology | Year: 2013

Food safety and quality control programmes are increasingly applied throughout the production food chain in order to guarantee added value products as well as to minimize the risk of infection for the consumer. The development of real-time PCR has represented one of the most significant advances in food diagnostics as it provides rapid, reliable and quantitative results. These aspects become increasingly important for the agricultural and food industry. Different strategies for real-time PCR diagnostics have been developed including unspecific detection independent of the target sequence using fluorescent dyes such as SYBR Green, or by sequence-specific fluorescent oligonucleotide probes such as TaqMan probes or molecular beacons.

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