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Lancioni G.E.,University of Bari | Singh N.N.,American Health and Wellness Institute | O'Reilly M.F.,University of Texas at Austin | Ferlisi G.,ffaele Care Center | And 4 more authors.
Developmental Neurorehabilitation | Year: 2012

Objective: To assess a technology-aided programme for promoting leisure engagement and communication in a man with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Method: The programme involved a laptop computer equipped with a Clicker 5 software package, an optic microswitch and an interface device. The participant could choose between two leisure options (i.e. songs and videos), could write requests and general messages through a virtual keyboard and a microswitch and could have the written text read out to caregivers and staff. Results: The use of the programme increased the mean frequency of words written to about 15 per 20-minute session during the second intervention phase. Those words were used by the participant for formulating a mean of over two requests/messages per session. The participant also listened to songs and watched videos. Conclusion: A simple technology-aided programme may allow ALS patients to manage leisure engagement and communication.


Lancioni G.E.,University of Bari | Bosco A.,University of Bari | Belardinelli M.O.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Singh N.N.,Georgia Regents University | And 3 more authors.
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience | Year: 2014

Post-coma persons in a minimally conscious state and with extensive motor impairment or emerging/emerged from such a state, but affected by lack of speech and motor impairment, tend to be passive and isolated. A way to help them develop functional responding to control environmental events and communication involves the use of intervention programs relying on assistive technology. This paper provides an overview of technology-based intervention programs for enabling the participants to (a) access brief periods of stimulation through one or two microswitches, (b) pursue stimulation and social contact through the combination of a microswitch and a sensor connected to a speech generating device (SGD) or through two SGD-related sensors, (c) control stimulation options through computer or radio systems and a microswitch, (d) communicate through modified messaging or telephone systems operated via microswitch, and (e) control combinations of leisure and communication options through computer systems operated via microswitch. Twenty-six studies, involving a total of 52 participants, were included in this paper. The intervention programs were carried out using single-subject methodology, and their outcomes were generally considered positive from the standpoint of the participants and their context. Practical implications of the programs are discussed. © 2014 Lancioni, Bosco, Olivetti Belardinelli, Singh, O'Reilly, Sigafoos and Oliva.


Lancioni G.E.,University of Bari | Singh N.N.,ONE Research Institute | O'Reilly M.F.,University of Texas at Austin | Sigafoos J.,Victoria University of Wellington | Oliva D.,Lega ro Research Center
Clinical Case Studies | Year: 2011

A new verbal-instruction system, which ensured the presentation of step instructions automatically, was used to help a woman with moderate intellectual disability and blindness perform food- and drink-preparation tasks. During Part I of the study, this system was compared with a system requiring the woman to seek instructions on her own. Two tasks were used, one with each system. During Part II of the study, the new system was applied with four additional tasks. The results of Part I showed the following: (a) the woman's level of correct performance on the task carried out with the new system was higher than the level on the other task and (b) performance of this latter task improved when the new system was used with it. The results of Part II showed satisfactory performance with all four tasks carried out with the new system. The implications of these data were discussed. © The Author(s) 2011.


Lancioni G.E.,University of Bari | O'Reilly M.F.,University of Texas at Austin | Singh N.N.,American Health and Wellness Institute | Oliva D.,Lega ro Research Center
Developmental Neurorehabilitation | Year: 2011

Objective: To assess whether two women with blindness and additional disabilities could make independent phone calls through a computer-aided telephone system. Method: For each participant, the study involved an ABAB design, in which the A represented baseline phases and the B represented intervention phases with the special telephone system (involving among others a net-book computer with specific software, a global system for mobile communication modem and a microswitch). Results: Both participants learned to use the system and made phone calls independently to a variety of partners such as family members, friends and staff personnel. Conclusion: The system assessed in this study might represent a useful means for enabling persons with blindness and additional disabilities to manage phone calls on their own. © 2011 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved.


Lancioni G.E.,University of Bari | O'Reilly M.F.,University of Texas at Austin | Singh N.N.,American Health and Wellness Institute | Green V.A.,Victoria University of Wellington | And 4 more authors.
Developmental Neurorehabilitation | Year: 2012

Objective: To expand recently-developed text messaging systems with new technology-based solutions so as to allow persons with multiple disabilities to write messages. Method: Two case studies were conducted. In Study I, the new technology-based solution involved vocal scanning of the alphabet letters to allow letter selection/writing and was assessed with a woman with blindness and extensive motor disability. In Study II, the new technology-based solution involved a touch-screen superimposed on letter symbols arranged alphabetically and was assessed with a man with acquired brain injury, motor disability and lack of speech. Each study involved an ABAB design. Results: Participants learned to write their messages, to send them out and to listen to incoming messages during intervention sessions of nearly 30 and 20 minutes, respectively. Conclusion: Text messaging systems can be developed that allow participants with multiple disabilities to write messages. © 2012 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved.

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