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De Paula Pantano N.,Learning and Research Institute | De Paula Pantano N.,Palliative Care and Quality of Life Research Group | Paiva B.S.R.,Learning and Research Institute | Paiva B.S.R.,Palliative Care and Quality of Life Research Group | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management | Year: 2016

Context The modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) is a well-known marker of systemic inflammatory response previously associated with poor prognoses in cancer. Objectives We investigated the relationships between mGPS and clinical variables and the prognostic impact of mGPS in patients with advanced cancer starting palliative care (PC). Methods Data from two prospective studies conducted at a tertiary cancer center were analyzed (N = 459). Data regarding patient characteristics, Karnofsky Performance Status, and blood samples were collected at the initial evaluation. The mGPS was calculated as follows: C-reactive protein (CRP) < 10 mg/L = 0; CRP > 10 mg/L = 1, CRP > 10 mg/L and albumin < 35 g/L = 2. Chi-square or Fisher exact tests were used for comparisons of categorical variables; continuous variables were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. For the survival analysis, Cox regression analyses were performed. Results mGPS of 0, 1, and 2 were assigned to 79.7%, 6.8%, and 13.5% of the patients, respectively. A positive association between hepatic metastasis (P = 0.004), primary lung cancer (P = 0.021), PC only (P < 0.001), lower Karnofsky Performance Status (P < 0.001), and higher systemic inflammation (mGPS 1/2) was found. Median overall survival was 1, 3, and 5.7 months for mGPS of 2, 1, and 0, respectively. After multivariate analyses, mGPS remained an independent prognostic marker (mGPS 1, hazard ratio 2.066, P = 0.001; mGPS 2, hazard ratio 2.664, P < 0.001). Conclusion Systemic inflammatory response is associated with a low functional status, primary lung cancers, and tumors with hepatic metastasis. When starting PC, an mGPS definition may have clinical utility implications, by identifying three groups of patients with advanced cancer patients with distinct survival outcomes. © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.


PubMed | Learning and Research Institute and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of pain and symptom management | Year: 2016

The modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) is a well-known marker of systemic inflammatory response previously associated with poor prognoses in cancer.We investigated the relationships between mGPS and clinical variables and the prognostic impact of mGPS in patients with advanced cancer starting palliative care (PC).Data from two prospective studies conducted at a tertiary cancer center were analyzed (N = 459). Data regarding patient characteristics, Karnofsky Performance Status, and blood samples were collected at the initial evaluation. The mGPS was calculated as follows: C-reactive protein (CRP) < 10 mg/L = 0; CRP > 10 mg/L = 1, CRP > 10 mg/L and albumin < 35 g/L = 2. Chi-square or Fisher exact tests were used for comparisons of categorical variables; continuous variables were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. For the survival analysis, Cox regression analyses were performed.mGPS of 0, 1, and 2 were assigned to 79.7%, 6.8%, and 13.5% of the patients, respectively. A positive association between hepatic metastasis (P = 0.004), primary lung cancer (P = 0.021), PC only (P < 0.001), lower Karnofsky Performance Status (P < 0.001), and higher systemic inflammation (mGPS 1/2) was found. Median overall survival was 1, 3, and 5.7 months for mGPS of 2, 1, and 0, respectively. After multivariate analyses, mGPS remained an independent prognostic marker (mGPS 1, hazard ratio 2.066, P = 0.001; mGPS 2, hazard ratio 2.664, P < 0.001).Systemic inflammatory response is associated with a low functional status, primary lung cancers, and tumors with hepatic metastasis. When starting PC, an mGPS definition may have clinical utility implications, by identifying three groups of patients with advanced cancer patients with distinct survival outcomes.

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