Center Lead

Staten Island, United States

Center Lead

Staten Island, United States
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Dumont D.M.,Center for Chronic Care and Disease Management | Baker L.,Center for Chronic Care and Disease Management | George E.,Center for Chronic Care and Disease Management | Sutton N.,Center Lead
Rhode Island medical journal (2013) | Year: 2016

Like most states in the U.S., Rhode Island's rate of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is rising as its population has both aged and become heavier. Risk of both BMI>=30 and DM has risen across almost all demographics, but disparities continue to exist in both conditions. We analyzed state health survey data to assess race/ethnicity-stratified DM and BMI and the age-adjusted rate of DM by weight status relative to the late 1990s. The prevalence of obesity increased across almost all demographic groups relative to 15 years ago, but the rise was greatest among non-Hispanic whites. The age-adjusted rate of DM had a similar increase across racial/ethnic categories where BMI>=30, but black adults were still at higher risk of DM even at a BMI<30. In sum, non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics are "catching up" to blacks' historically higher prevalence of obesity and DM, but disparities remain in both conditions. We describe two ways providers can collaborate with the Department of Health to address these growing health problems. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-11.asp].


PubMed | Center Lead and Center for Chronic Care and Disease Management
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Rhode Island medical journal (2013) | Year: 2016

Like most states in the U.S., Rhode Islands rate of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is rising as its population has both aged and become heavier. Risk of both BMI>=30 and DM has risen across almost all demographics, but disparities continue to exist in both conditions. We analyzed state health survey data to assess race/ethnicity-stratified DM and BMI and the age-adjusted rate of DM by weight status relative to the late 1990s. The prevalence of obesity increased across almost all demographic groups relative to 15 years ago, but the rise was greatest among non-Hispanic whites. The age-adjusted rate of DM had a similar increase across racial/ethnic categories where BMI>=30, but black adults were still at higher risk of DM even at a BMI<30. In sum, non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics are catching up to blacks historically higher prevalence of obesity and DM, but disparities remain in both conditions. We describe two ways providers can collaborate with the Department of Health to address these growing health problems. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-11.asp].

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