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London, Canada

Lawson Health Research Institute is large hospital based research institutes located in London, Canada. Lawson is the research institute of London Health science Centre and St. Joseph's Health Care, London and works in partnership with The University of Western Ontario.In 2008, there were over 1,200 scientists, technicians and support staff working for the Lawson Health Research Institute. They received more than $60-million CDN in peer reviewed and industry sponsored contract research funding. Wikipedia.


Reid G.,Lawson Health Research Institute
Gut microbes | Year: 2010

In demonstrating that it is feasible to create a community-run kitchen that produces probiotic yogurt, and that this can contribute to the health of people with HIV/AIDS, we embellished the 2001 Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and World Health Organization (WHO) report on probiotics that recommended efforts be made to take probiotics to developing countries. We proved that driven by humanitarian goals not profit, probiotic yogurt can be produced in the world's poor regions. This food can be safely consumed by HIV/AIDS subjects, and in many of them benefits can be accrued in gut health, nutritional and potentially immune status. Such outcomes have a scientific rationale, many social implications, and perhaps most importantly raise the question, why have developed countries not tried harder to bring nutrition-based probiotics to people in need? © 2010 Landes Bioscience Source


St Lawrence K.,Lawson Health Research Institute
Physics in medicine and biology | Year: 2013

Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) methods are widely used with magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography to assess the vascular characteristics of tumours since these properties can affect the response to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In contrast, there have been far fewer studies using optical-based applications despite the advantages of low cost and safety. This study investigated an appropriate kinetic model for optical applications to characterize tumour haemodynamics (blood flow, F, blood volume, V(b), and vascular heterogeneity) and vascular leakage (permeability surface-area product, PS). DCE data were acquired with two dyes, indocyanine green (ICG) and 800 CW carboxylate (IRD(cbx)), from a human colon tumour xenograph model in rats. Due to the smaller molecular weight of IRD(cbx) (1166 Da) compared to albumin-bound ICG (67 kDa), PS of IRD(cbx) was significantly larger; however, no significant differences in F and V(b) were found between the dyes as expected. Error analysis demonstrated that all parameters could be estimated with an uncertainty less than 5% due to the high temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of the optical measurements. The next step is to adapt this approach to optical imaging to generate haemodynamics and permeability maps, which should enhance the clinical interest in optics for treatment monitoring. Source


Croker A.K.,University of Western Ontario | Allan A.L.,University of Western Ontario | Allan A.L.,Lawson Health Research Institute
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2012

The majority of breast cancer deaths are because of ineffective treatment of metastatic disease. We previously identified a subpopulation of cells in human breast cancer cell lines that demonstrate high activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and high expression of CD44. These ALDH hiCD44 + cells displayed enhanced metastatic behavior in vitro and in vivo relative to ALDH lowCD44 - cells. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that ALDH hiCD44 + breast cancer cells are more resistant to standard cancer therapy, and that inhibiting ALDH activity through all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or the specific ALDH inhibitor diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB) sensitizes these cells to treatment. ALDH hiCD44 + and ALDH lowCD44 - populations were isolated from MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells lines and exposed to chemotherapy (doxorubicin/paclitaxel) or radiotherapy ± ATRA or DEAB. Cell populations were assessed for differences in survival, colony formation, and protein expression related to therapy resistance and differentiation. Significantly more ALDH hiCD44 + cells survived chemotherapy/radiotherapy relative to ALDH lowCD44 - cells (P < 0.001). Glutathione-S-transferase pi, p-glycoprotein, and/or CHK1 were overexpressed in ALDH hiCD44 + populations compared with ALDH lowCD44 - populations (P < 0.05). Pre-treatment of cell populations with DEAB or ATRA had no effect on ALDH lowCD44 - cells, but resulted in significant initial sensitization of ALDH hiCD44 + cells to chemotherapy/ radiotherapy. However, only DEAB had a long-term effect, resulting in reduced colony formation (P < 0.01). ATRA also significantly increased expression of CK8/18/19 in MDA-MB-468 ALDH hiCD44 + cells compared with control (P < 0.05). Our novel findings indicate that ALDH hiCD44 + breast cancer cells contribute to both chemotherapy and radiation resistance and suggest a much broader role for ALDH in treatment response than previously reported. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source


Reid G.,Lawson Health Research Institute
Gut Microbes | Year: 2010

In demonstrating that it is feasible to create a community-run kitchen that produces probiotic yogurt, and that this can contribute to the health of people with HIV/AIDS, we embellished the 2001 Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and World Health Organization (WHO) Report on Probiotics that recommended efforts be made to take probiotics to developing countries. We proved that driven by humanitarian goals not profit, probiotic yogurt can be produced in the world's poor regions. This food can be safely consumed by HIV/AIDS subjects, and in many of them benefits can be accrued in gut health, nutritional and potentially immune status. Such outcomes have a scientific rationale, many social implications, and perhaps most importantly raise the question, why have developed countries not tried harder to bring nutrition-based probiotics to people in need?. © 2010 Landes Bioscience. Source


Clark W.F.,Lawson Health Research Institute
Journal of Clinical Apheresis | Year: 2012

Over the past 37 year the role of plasma exchange in the treatment of patients with renal disease has undergone several changes. The majority of the changes for the use of plasma exchange relied on randomized control trials and delineations of mechanisms that potentially would benefit from the use of plasma exchange. Over the past 11 years plasma exchange indications for renal disease, the absolute numbers have been relatively unchanged but the indications are quite different. The Canadian Apheresis Group indicated in 2010 that TTP/HUS is still the number 1 indication at 63% of the total plasma exchange activity for renal disease but P and C ANCA Vasculitis had risen to 14% followed by renal transplant at 10%, Goodpasture's Syndrome at 6% and transplant FSGS at 5% with Cryoglobulinemia 2% and Myeloma Nephropathy had dropped dramatically to less than 1% with no cases of SLE reported. This report describes the most common indications for plasma exchange in patient's with renal disease and the evidence that supports it's use in 2011. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source

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