Lavras, Brazil
Lavras, Brazil

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Santos C.R.D.S.,Lavras University Center | Santos V.L.C.D.G.,University of Sao Paulo
Neurourology and Urodynamics | Year: 2011

Aims To determine the prevalence, and sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with combined fecal and urinary incontinence in adults living in Pouso Alegre, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Methods This epidemiological study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the University of São Paulo School of Nursing. The participants were selected using a stratified cluster sampling design. The final sample consisted of 519 individuals, randomly selected, aged ≥18 years, living in 341 households in the urban area. Prevalence was adjusted for age and gender. Results The total prevalence of double incontinence was 3.0% (men 1.0%; women 5.0%). The results of the final logistic regression model showed that changes in the habit of going out (odds ratio = 62.2; P < 0.001), duration of incontinence (odds ratio = 39.2; P < 0.001), female gender (odds ratio = 21.6; P < 0.001), and widowhood (odds ratio = 19.4; P < 0.001) were associated with the presence of double incontinence. Conclusion The study allowed a better understanding of the epidemiology of double incontinence and may contribute to the development of public policies and programs for primary and secondary prevention and treatment of double incontinence, at least at the municipal level. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Pereira S.M.,University of Campinas | Pereira S.M.,Lavras University Center | Cenci M.S.,University of Campinas | Cortellazzi K.L.,University of Campinas
General Dentistry | Year: 2010

This study investigated the correlation between sugar consumption and dental caries in a random sample of 184 schoolchildren (all 12 years of age) from public and private schools in Piracicaba, Brazil. A seven-day diet record was administered in a cross-sectional survey. Diet records were used to determine the frequency of sugar consumption both during and between meals. Socioeconomic and behavioral variables were collected in a semi-structured questionnaire. Using Community Periodontal Index (CPI) probes and mirrors and following WHO recommendations, a calibrated dentist assessed the number of decayed, missing, and filled surfaces (DMFS) on permanent teeth, the CPI, and the number of noncavitated (NC) carious lesions. Data analysis demonstrated significant correlations between NC carious lesions and sugar consumption during morning snack (p = 0.0282; r= 0.1618), NC carious lesions and sugar consumption during lunch (p = 0.0539; r= 0.1425), monthly family income and sugar consumption during dinner (p < 0.001; r/= 0.2970), father's education and sugar consumption during dinner (p = 0.0027; r= 0.2430), and onset of toothbrushing and sugar consumption during dinner (p = 0.0159; r= 0.1786). A high consumption of sweet foods/beverages occurred between meals (mean = 17.48; standard deviation = 14.68). Although there was no correlation between DMFS and sugar consumption, there was a correlation between NC carious lesions and sugar consumption, indicating that the rational use of sugar is an important factor in caries prevention.


Pereira L.J.,Federal University of Lavras | Foureaux R.C.,Federal University of Lavras | Pereira C.V.,Lavras University Center | Alves M.C.,University of Sao Paulo | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Oral Rehabilitation | Year: 2016

The relationship between type 2 diabetes oral physiology, nutritional intake and quality of life has not been fully elucidated. We assessed the impact of type 2 diabetes – exclusive or associated with hypertension with beta-blockers treatment – on oral physiology, mastication, nutrition and quality of life. This cross-sectional study was performed with 78 complete dentate subjects (15 natural teeth and six masticatory units minimum; without removable or fixed prostheses), divided into three groups: diabetics (DM) (n = 20; 45·4 ± 9·5 years), diabetics with hypertension and receiving beta-blockers treatment (DMH) (n = 19; 41·1 ± 5·1 years) and controls (n = 39; 44·5 ± 11·7 years) matched for gender, age and socioeconomic status. Blood glucose, masticatory performance, swallowing threshold, taste, food intake, stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow, pH and buffering capacity of saliva were assessed. Glycemia was higher in DM than in controls (P < 0·01). No differences were observed between DM and controls for nutrition and quality of life. Both stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rate were lower in DMH (P < 0·01), which also presented the lowest number of teeth and masticatory units (P < 0·0001), and reduction in the number of chewing cycles (P < 0·01). Controls showed lower Decayed Missing Filled Teeth index (DMFT) scores in comparison with DMH (P = 0·021). Masticatory performance and saliva buffering capacity were similar among groups. Exclusive type 2 diabetes did not alter oral physiology, nutrition or quality of life. However, when hypertension and beta-blockers treatment were associated with diabetes, the salivary flow rate, chewing cycles and number of teeth decreased. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd


PubMed | Lavras University Center, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Federal University of Lavras, University of Sao Paulo and University of Campinas
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of oral rehabilitation | Year: 2016

The relationship between type 2 diabetes oral physiology, nutritional intake and quality of life has not been fully elucidated. We assessed the impact of type 2 diabetes - exclusive or associated with hypertension with beta-blockers treatment - on oral physiology, mastication, nutrition and quality of life. This cross-sectional study was performed with 78 complete dentate subjects (15 natural teeth and six masticatory units minimum; without removable or fixed prostheses), divided into three groups: diabetics (DM) (n = 20; 454 95 years), diabetics with hypertension and receiving beta-blockers treatment (DMH) (n = 19; 411 51 years) and controls (n = 39; 445 117 years) matched for gender, age and socioeconomic status. Blood glucose, masticatory performance, swallowing threshold, taste, food intake, stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow, pH and buffering capacity of saliva were assessed. Glycemia was higher in DM than in controls (P < 001). No differences were observed between DM and controls for nutrition and quality of life. Both stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rate were lower in DMH (P < 001), which also presented the lowest number of teeth and masticatory units (P < 00001), and reduction in the number of chewing cycles (P < 001). Controls showed lower Decayed Missing Filled Teeth index (DMFT) scores in comparison with DMH (P = 0021). Masticatory performance and saliva buffering capacity were similar among groups. Exclusive type 2 diabetes did not alter oral physiology, nutrition or quality of life. However, when hypertension and beta-blockers treatment were associated with diabetes, the salivary flow rate, chewing cycles and number of teeth decreased.


Pereira L.J.,Federal University of Lavras | Caputo J.B.,Lavras University Center | Castelo P.M.,Federal University of São Paulo | Andrade E.F.,Federal University of Lavras | And 4 more authors.
Nutricion Hospitalaria | Year: 2015

Introduction: Cancer treatment can affect the health of the teeth and support structures, which are essential to the chewing process, which may change the nutritional status of the patient. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of oral physiology changes on quality of life (QoL) of patients submitted to cancer treatment. Design: Initially 84 cancer patients were screened and only those presenting at least 15 natural teeth were selected for oral physiology and quality of life tests. The final sample comprised 30 patients. Twenty subjects were selected as controls paired by age and gender. Dental caries status, salivary flow, masticatory performance (MP), location of tumor, duration of chemo and radiotherapy and World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-bref) questionnaire were assessed. Linear regression models were used to test the relationship between the WHOQOL-bref domains (physical, psychological, social relationship, environmental and overall QoL) and independent variables under study. Results and Discussion: Number of teeth, MP and salivary flow were lower in cancer patients, as well as for the scores obtained in Social Relationship, Environment and Overall QoL domains (p<0.050). Breast cancer caused a negative impact on Psychological (p<0.001) and Overall QoL scores (p=0.017). A similar negative effect was found for the duration of radiotherapy on Psychological (p=0.012) and Environmental (p=0.039) domains. On the other hand, the maintenance of teeth had a positive impact on Psychological (p=0.012) and Environmental (p=0.024) scores. Conclusion: Oral physiology changes may impact the QoL of oncological patients. The maintenance of teeth was of positive importance, especially for the psychological aspects. © 2015 Grupo Aula Medica S.A. All rights reserved.


de Matos L.F.,University of Rio Verde | de Matos L.F.,Lavras University Center | Pereira S.M.,Lavras University Center | Kaminagakura E.,Lavras University Center | And 6 more authors.
Archives of Oral Biology | Year: 2010

Objective: Assess the influence of salivary flow on physiological parameters of the stomatognathic system in patients who take beta-blockers or anxiolytic medications. Design: Sixty patients were divided into three groups based on the following criteria: Group 1, control (n = 20; no use of medication); Group 2, use of antihypertensive beta-blockers (n = 20); and Group 3, use of benzodiazepine anxiolytics (n = 20). Salivary flow was assessed by determining stimulated and non-stimulated flow/minute. The quantification of the sense of taste was determined on a visual analogue scale (VAS) using solutions of 0.9% NaCl (salty), 50% sucrose (sweet), 20% unsweetened coffee (bitter) and 4.2% vinegar (sour). The DMFT index (number of decayed/missing/filled teeth) was determined by a calibrated examination, following the criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO). Masticatory performance was assessed with an Optosil comminution test and Rosim-Ramler equation. Results: The results did not reveal a significant correlation between salivary flow and masticatory performance (p > 0.05). We observed significant decreased non-stimulated salivary flow for Group 2 (p = 0.05) when compared to controls. However, taste perception was not influenced by salivary secretion amongst groups. Furthermore, we observed a significant negative correlation between non-stimulated salivary flow and DMFT in Group 1 (p = 0.02; r = -0.52). Conclusions: Patients under beta-blockers therapy presented reduced non-stimulated salivary flow when compared to controls, without influencing the sense of taste or masticatory performance. The use of anxiolytics did not affect salivary flow and taste perception in the studied sample. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Lavras University Center
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Clinical implant dentistry and related research | Year: 2013

This study histomorphometrically analyzed the effect of autogenous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on healing of fresh frozen bone allograft (FFBA) in bony defects in rat calvaria.A 5mm-diameter defect was created in the calvarium of 30 rats. Animals were divided into three groups: C (defect was filled by blood clot only), FFBA (defect was filled with 0.01mL of FFBA), and FFBA/PRP (defect was filled with 0.01mL of FFBA combined with 100L of PRP). All animals were euthanized at 30 days postoperatively. Histomorphometry and histology analyses were performed. Data were statistically analyzed (analysis of variance, Tukey, p<.05).FFBA had a statistically smaller new bone area than groups FFBA/PRP and C. No statistically significant differences were observed between groups FFBA and FFBA/PRP with regard to remaining bone graft particle area.It can be concluded that (1) PRP improved the incorporation of FFBA, increasing the amount of new bone formed; (2) PRP has not influenced the resorption of nonviable particles of the FFBA; and (3) presence of remaining FFBA particles might have accounted for the smaller amount of new bone observed in group FFBA when compared with control group.

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