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Scholz E.,Lausitzer und Mitteldeutsche Bergbau Verwaltungsgesellschaft mbH
World of Mining - Surface and Underground | Year: 2014

The author, E. Scholz, provides information on the current state of the mining rehabilitation measures and the new challenges lying ahead in establishing and assuring public safety. The LMBV Corporation compiled 180 closure operation plans which have already been implemented at a great extent. The new challenges that are being apparent include stabilizing inner overburden dumps which are susceptible to liquefaction as well as implementing measures to protect bodies of flowing water against the high infiltration of substances due to mining operations. Within the scope of mining rehabilitation, Geiseltal Valley represented 30 closely linked open-pit mines, seam thicknesses of upto 120m and slope heights of upto 200m. The slopes were secured and stabilized, with the heavy duty open pit mining equipment. Another special feature was the mass extraction by walking excavators to relieve the slope head as well as the immediate sluicing of overburden masses in order to stabilize the slope toe. Source


Kuyumcu M.,Lausitzer und Mitteldeutsche Bergbau Verwaltungsgesellschaft mbH
World of Mining - Surface and Underground | Year: 2011

This presentation will initially cover the restructuring process of the mining industry in former East Germany after German reunification. It will then summarize the remaining work to be performed by the public sector for mining operations to be shut down. An explanation will follow of the many technical and ecological challenges with re-dedication to new use of former mining areas of the decommissioned companies in the lignite industry. The presentation will then elaborate on the challenges encountered in elimination of man-made disturbances to the groundwater balance and to the system of surface bodies of water made by the mining industry of former East Germany. Remediation of around 100,000 hectares of mining area, and restoration of an extensively self-regulating water balance over a surface area of approx. 390,000 hectares, involved the largest single landscape construction site in Europe. In addition to representation of the results and diverse experience achieved over the past 20 years, a description will also follow of our new challenges and of an outlook on our remaining tasks. Source


Uhlig G.,Lausitzer und Mitteldeutsche Bergbau Verwaltungsgesellschaft mbH
World of Mining - Surface and Underground | Year: 2012

Lignite mine rehabilitation with its visible changes in the landscape has made a very positive contribution towards increasing the public awareness of the entire lignite mining industry over the past two decades. The Federal Government, the lignite mining states, the responsible authorities, and the municipal administrations all express their confidence and trust in LMBV's ability to master the remaining, scheduled tasks as well as the new challenges of lignite mine rehabilitation. Germany's lignite mining industry will continue to contribute towards the competitiveness of the national economy by supplying energy from domestic lignite in a reliable and environmentally tolerable manner and creating safe and attractive post-mining landscapes that assure and permit flexible, multifaceted use also in the future. Source


Totsche O.,Lausitzer und Mitteldeutsche Bergbau Verwaltungsgesellschaft mbH | Benthaus F.-C.,Lausitzer und Mitteldeutsche Bergbau Verwaltungsgesellschaft mbH | Uhlmann W.,Institute For Wasser Und Boden Dr Uhlmann | Theiss S.,Institute For Wasser Und Boden Dr Uhlmann
FOG - Freiberg Online Geoscience | Year: 2015

In the post mining landscape two areas are affected by iron ochre: The southern Spree area upstream the Spremberg reservoir and the northern Spree area, which includes the southern tributaries to the Spreewald (see Part 1). LMBV developed concepts for both areas and took first measures. The main aim of these measures is the protection of the Spremberg reservoir in the southern Spree area and the biosphere reserve Spreewald in the northern Spree area. In the medium-term the iron load of all first order and second order streams should be reduced. At hot spots in the southern Spree area mobile container based water treatment plants will be built for the short-term. In the medium-term the iron rich groundwater will be collected by drains and filtering wells before it enters the rivers. The effect of a sealing wall is investigated as long-term solution. At the northern Spree area an old mine water treatment plant was recommissioned as treatment plant for stream water. Additionally a new stream water treatment plant was build. In the medium-term these measures will be complemented by other iron reducing measurements in the catchment area. © 2015, Technical University Freiberg. All rights reserved. Source


Uhlmann W.,Institute For Wasser Und Boden Dr Uhlmann | Theiss S.,Institute For Wasser Und Boden Dr Uhlmann | Totsche O.,Lausitzer und Mitteldeutsche Bergbau Verwaltungsgesellschaft mbH | Benthaus F.-C.,Lausitzer und Mitteldeutsche Bergbau Verwaltungsgesellschaft mbH
FOG - Freiberg Online Geoscience | Year: 2015

The groundwater lowering in the Lusatian lignite mining district caused the aeration of Tertiary, Pleistocene and Holocene sediments in the cone of depression for decades. Thereby the pyrite was oxidized. This formed acidic, sulphate and iron rich ground waters. The ground water rising brings the weathering products iron and sulfate into the watercourses as diffuse sources. Especially, the rivers Spree and Kleine Spree south of the town Spremberg as well as the southerly tributaries to the Spreewald are affected. The main sources of the iron contamination are Pleistocene aquifers and Holocene low-level moors. In small watercourses the iron concentration can be more than 100 mg/L. In the river Spree south of Spremberg the iron concentration is between 3 and 8 mg/L depending on the flow rate. In the Lusatia more than 100 km of the main watercourses are affected by the sedimentation of iron hydroxides. © 2015, Technical University Freiberg. All rights reserved. Source

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