Grenoble, France
Grenoble, France

The Institut Laue–Langevin, or ILL, is an internationally financed scientific facility, situated in Grenoble, France. It is one of the world centres for research using neutrons. Founded in 1967 and honouring the physicists Max von Laue and Paul Langevin, the ILL currently provides one of the most intense neutron sources in the world and the most intense continuous neutron flux in the world in the moderator region: 1.5x1015 neutrons per second per cm2, with a thermal power of 58.3 MW. The ILL neutron scattering facilities provide an indispensable analytical tool for the analysis of the structure of novel conducting and magnetic materials for future electronic devices, the measurement of stresses in mechanical materials, and investigations into how complex molecular assemblies behave, particularly in a biological environment. The ILL also tackles questions relating to the fundamental properties of matter.The institute was founded by France and Germany, with the United Kingdom becoming the third major partner in 1973. These partner states provide, through Research Councils, the bulk of its funding. Ten other countries have since become partners. Scientists of institutions in the member states may apply to use the ILL facilities, and may invite scientists from other countries to participate. Experimental time is allocated by a scientific council involving ILL users. The use of the facility and travel costs for researchers are paid for by the institute. Commercial use, for which a fee is charged, is not subject to the scientific council review process. Over 750 experiments are completed every year, in fields including magnetism, superconductivity, materials engineering, and the study of liquids, colloids and biological substances. The high-flux research reactor produces neutrons through fission in a specially designed, compact-core fuel element. Neutron moderators cool the neutrons to useful wavelengths, which are then directed at a suite of instruments and used to probe the structure and behaviour of many forms of matter by elastic and inelastic neutron scattering, and to probe the fundamental physical properties of the neutron. Nothing goes to waste: Fission products and gamma rays produced by nuclear reactions in the reactor core are also used by specialised instruments, which forms an important part of the instrument suite.An ambitious modernisation programme was launched in 2000, through the design of new neutron infrastructure and the introduction of new instruments and instrument upgrades. The first phase has already resulted in 17-fold gains in performance. The second phase has started in 2008, it comprises the building of 5 new instruments, the upgrade of 4 others, and the installation of 3 new neutron guides.The ILL shares its site, the 'epn science campus', with other institutions including the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory and the Unit for Viral Host Cell Interactions . Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-3-2015 | Award Amount: 19.94M | Year: 2015

The science of materials has always been at the centre of scientific and technological progress in human development. The tools to understand materials that fashion them to meet our societal needs have been just as important. Thermal neutrons are one of the most powerful probes that look directly at the structure and dynamics of materials from the macro- to the microscopic scale and from nano-seconds to seconds. It is therefore natural that a group of 17 European Partner Countries have joined together to construct the worlds most powerful neutron source, the European Spallation Source (ESS). The importance of ESS has been recognised by ESFRI who have prioritised it as one of three Research Infrastructures (RIs) for this INFRADEV-3 call. However, simply constructing the most powerful spallation neutron source will not, by itself, ensure the maximum scientific or technological impact. What is needed is an integrated program that ensures that key challenges are met in order to build an ESS that can deliver high impact scientific and technological knowledge. With a timeline of 36 months, involving 18 Consortium Partners and a budget of 19.941.964, the BrightnESS proposal will ensure that (A) the extensive knowledge and skills of European companies, and institutes, are best deployed in the form of In-Kind Contributions to ESS for its construction and operation, (B) that technology transfer both to, and from, the ESS to European institutions and companies is optimised and, (C) that the maximum technical performance is obtained from the ESS target, moderators and detectors in order to deliver world class science and insights for materials technology and innovation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: INFRASUPP-6-2014 | Award Amount: 1.70M | Year: 2015

This CREMLIN proposal is to foster scientific cooperation between the Russian Federation and the European Union in the development and scientific exploitation of large-scale research infrastructures. It has been triggered by the recent so-called megascience projects initiative launched by and in the Russian Federation which is now very actively seeking European integration. The proposed megascience facilities have an enormous potential for the international scientific communities and represent a unique opportunity for the EU to engage in a strong collaborative framework with the Russian Federation. The CREMLIN proposal is a first and path finding step to identify, build and enhance scientific cooperation and strong enduring networks between European research infrastructures and the corresponding megascience facilities to maximize scientific returns. The proposal follows the specific recommendations of an EC Expert Group by devising concrete coordination and support measures for each megascience facility and by developing common best practice and policies on internationalisation and opening. CREMLIN will thus effectively contribute to better connect Russian RIs to the European Research Area.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Training Grant | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2014

The Scottish Doctoral Training Centre in Condensed Matter Physics, known as the CM-DTC, is an EPSRC-funded Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) addressing the broad field of Condensed Matter Physics (CMP). CMP is a core discipline that underpins many other areas of science, and is one of the Priority Areas for this CDT call. Renewal funding for the CM-DTC will allow five more annual cohorts of PhD students to be recruited, trained and released onto the market. They will be highly educated professionals with a knowledge of the field, in depth and in breadth, that will equip them for future leadership in a variety of academic and industrial careers. Condensed Matter Physics research impacts on many other fields of science including engineering, biophysics, photonics, chemistry, and materials science. It is a significant engine for innovation and drives new technologies. Recent examples include the use of liquid crystals for displays including flat-screen and 3D television, and the use of solid-state or polymeric LEDs for power-saving high-illumination lighting systems. Future examples may involve harnessing the potential of graphene (the worlds thinnest and strongest sheet-like material), or the creation of exotic low-temperature materials whose properties may enable the design of radically new types of (quantum) computer with which to solve some of the hardest problems of mathematics. The UKs continued ability to deliver transformative technologies of this character requires highly trained CMP researchers such as those the Centre will produce. The proposed training approach is built on a strong framework of taught lecture courses, with core components and a wide choice of electives. This spans the first two years so that PhD research begins alongside the coursework from the outset. It is complemented by hands-on training in areas such as computer-intensive physics and instrument building (including workshop skills and 3D printing). Some lecture courses are delivered in residential schools but most are videoconferenced live, using the well-established infrastructure of SUPA (the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance). Students meet face to face frequently, often for more than one day, at cohort-building events that emphasise teamwork in science, outreach, transferable skills and careers training. National demand for our graduates is demonstrated by the large number of companies and organisations who have chosen to be formally affiliated with our CDT as Industrial Associates. The range of sectors spanned by these Associates is notable. Some, such as e2v and Oxford Instruments, are scientific consultancies and manufacturers of scientific equipment, whom one would expect to be among our core stakeholders. Less obviously, the list also represents scientific publishers, software houses, companies small and large from the energy sector, large multinationals such as Solvay-Rhodia and Siemens, and finance and patent law firms. This demonstrates a key attraction of our graduates: their high levels of core skills, and a hands-on approach to problem solving. These impart a discipline-hopping ability which more focussed training for specific sectors can complement, but not replace. This breadth is prized by employers in a fast-changing environment where years of vocational training can sometimes be undermined very rapidly by unexpected innovation in an apparently unrelated sector. As the UK builds its technological future by funding new CDTs across a range of priority areas, it is vital to include some that focus on core discipline skills, specifically Condensed Matter Physics, rather than the interdisciplinary or semi-vocational training that features in many other CDTs. As well as complementing those important activities today, our highly trained PhD graduates will be equipped to lay the foundations for the research fields (and perhaps some of the industrial sectors) of tomorrow.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2011-1.1.17. | Award Amount: 15.90M | Year: 2012

Advanced solutions to the challenges that confront our technology-based society from energy and environment to health are crucially dependent on advanced knowledge of material properties down to the atomic scale. Neutron and Muon spectroscopy offer unique analytical tools for material investigation. They are thus an indispensible building block of the European Research Area and directly address the objectives of the Innovation Union Flagship Initiative. The knowledge creation via neutron and muon spectroscopy relies on the performance of a closely interdependent eco-system comprising large-scale facilities and academic and industrial users. The Integrated Infrastructure Initiative for Neutron and Muon Spectroscopy (NMI3) aims at a pan-European integration of the main actors within this eco-system. The NMI3 coordination effort will render public investment more efficient by harmonizing and reinforcing the services provided to the user community. It will thus directly contribute to maintaining Europes world-leading position. NMI3 is a comprehensive consortium of 18 partners from 11 different countries that includes all major providers of neutrons and muons in Europe. NMI3 exploits all tools available within I3s to realize its objectives. - Transnational Open Access will build further capacity for European users. It will foster mobility and improve the overall creation of scientific knowledge by providing the best researchers with the opportunity to use the most adapted infrastructures. - Joint Research activities will create synergies in innovative instrument development that will feed directly into improved and more efficient provision of services to the users. - Networking activities will reinforce integration by harmonizing procedures, setting standards and disseminating knowledge. Particular attention is given to train young people via the European Neutron and Muon School as well as through an e-learning platform.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-4-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 12.08M | Year: 2015

Todays society is being transformed by new materials and processes. Analytical techniques underpin their development and neutrons, with their unique properties, play a pivotal role in a multi-disciplinary, knowledge-based approach. Industry and the neutron research community must however work together more closely to enhance their innovation potential. Neutrons are only available at large scale facilities (LSFs), presenting specific challenges for outreach. National and European initiatives have combined to create a user community of almost 10000, mainly academia-based users, which is supported by an ecosystem of about 10, often world-class national facilities and the European facility, the Institute Laue Langevin. Europe leads neutron science and is investing almost 2B in the European Spallation Source (ESS), its construction, like Horizon 2020, spanning the period 2014-2020. SINE2020, world-class Science and Innovation with Neutrons in Europe in 2020, is therefore a project with two objectives; preparing Europe for the unique opportunities at ESS in 2020 and developing the innovation potential of neutron LSFs. Common services underpin the European research area for neutrons. New and improved services will be developed in SINE2020, by the LSFs and partners in 13 countries, in a holistic approach including outreach, samples, instrumentation and software. These services are the key to integrating ESS in the European neutron ecosystem, ensuring scientific success from day one. They are also the basis for facilitating direct use of neutron LSFs by industry. Particular emphasis is placed on the industry consultancy, which will reach out to industry and develop a business model for direct, industry use of LSFs in 2020, and data treatment, exploiting a game-changing opportunity at LSFs to adopt a common software approach in the production of scientific results.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: INFRASUPP-01-2016 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2017

RISCAPE will provide systematic, focused, high quality, comprehensive, consistent and peer-reviewed international landscape analysis report on the position and complementarities of the major European research infrastructures in the international research infrastructure landscape. To achieve this, RISCAPE will establish a close links with a stakeholder panel representing the main user groups of the report, including representatives from ESFRI, the OECD and Member state funding agencies to ensure usability and the focus of the Report. It will also benefit from close co-operation with other projects and initiatives in the European research infrastructures development to ensure consistency with the existing landscape work. Particularly, RISCAPE builds on the European Research Infrastructures (RIs) in the ESFRI landscape report (2016) and on the landscape analysis done or currently underway in the H2020 cluster projects. RISCAPE leverages the experts on the European RIs with extensive knowledge on the disciplines involved and RI development in Europe and the project benefits from the contacts and tools developed in the cluster- and international RI collaboration projects to maximize the discipline-specific usability of the results. A key factor in the RISCAPE analysis is that the complementarities will be analyzed in a way which is natural and suitable for the discipline and RI in question. The resulting Report and the used methods will be independently peer reviewed to maximize the usability and objectivity of the information provided for the EU strategic RI development and policy. The project answers directly to the European Commission strategy on EU international cooperation in research and innovation, particularly on the need to obtain objective information in order to help implement the (EC) strategic approach.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 972.00K | Year: 2017

This project aims to stimulate intersectoral and international collaboration within Europe and with an ICPC country, Kazakhstan, in the area of novel nanoporous and nanostructured adsorbents for the treatment of very serious health conditions associated with acute and chronic exposure to external radiation and uptake of heavy metals and radiation as a consequence of accidental, occupational or deliberate activities and events. This can dramatically lower the quality of life of the people affected and at present the treatment available is costly and inefficient. Radioactive contamination is a particularly serious problem in two of the countries participating in this project, namely, Ukraine and Kazakhstan, on large territories of the Chernobyl zone and around Semipalatinsk nuclear test site, respectively. A large number of people are affected by living in the areas with elevated level of radioactivity with uncertain long-term consequences to their health and the health of future generations. The expected impact of the project results is development of efficient and cost-effective methods of protection of first responders, population and cancer patients treated with radiotherapy from elevated doses of external and incorporated radiation and for occupational health protection of personnel working and the population living in areas contaminated with heavy metals.


Nozieres P.,Laue Langevin Institute
Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics | Year: 2012

Condensed matter physics has changed since the fifties: I attempt to retrace its evolution in the light of my own trajectory. It was and it remains a living field, in constant renewal. New ideas, new concepts keep appearing along with new experimental and theoretical tools. The danger lies in the bureaucratic evolution of scientific research, which might sterilize imagination and innovation. The future lies in the hands of young physicists who should defend their independence and creativity against fashions and competition. Copyright © 2012 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Dupuis A.-C.,Laue Langevin Institute
Progress in Materials Science | Year: 2011

Given the energy problem that our society is facing, interest has been growing in the so-called hydrogen economy. In this system, fuel cells play an essential part. This paper gives an overview of the different materials currently thought to be potential proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells operated at medium temperatures (100-200 °C). This includes perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membranes like Nafion® but Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, Franceese materials will be given. The most frequently used experimental techniques to study the morphology of these membrane materials and their proton conduction mechanisms and water transport will be reviewed and presented. The aim of this review is double: to help scientists and science managers not yet in this field to easily gain an overview of the state-of-the-art membrane materials and the experimental techniques used to study them; and to give insight to scientists already carrying out research on membrane materials on how to extend their research either on other materials or with other experimental techniques. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NFRP-08-2015 | Award Amount: 6.35M | Year: 2015

In the framework of the joint international efforts to reduce the risk of proliferation by minimising the use of highly enriched uranium, a new research reactor fuel based on uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloys is being developed by the HERACLES group. HERACLES is composed of AREVA-CERVA, CEA, ILL, SCKCEN and TUM, all organisations with a long-standing history in fuel manufacturing and qualification. HERACLES works towards the qualification of UMo fuels, based on a series of comprehension experiments and manufacturing developments. There are two types of UMo fuel fine particles dispersed in an Al matrix, and monolithic foils. The qualification phase of these fuels is scheduled to begin in 2019; the project will prepare the way with an initial comprehension phase, to improve our understanding of the fuels irradiation behaviour and consequent the manufacturing/industrialisation process. One of the key components in the project is the SEMPER FIDELIS irradiation test, which aims at investigating the fuel swelling phenomenon and the effects of coating, with a view to arriving at procedures for fuel engineering. The challenges as regards manufacture lie in the basic elements of both fuel types production process and plate manufacturing. For the dispersed fuel, this includes the pin casting for the rotating electrode process and the atomization process itself. For the monolithic fuel, this concerns the development of coating for the foils. All these components are essential to prepare the fuel qualification phase. High-performance research reactors are at the start of the supply chain for medical isotopes like 99Mo. Successful conversion to lower enriched and where possible LEU fuel is therefore a key element in the mitigation of the risks surrounding the supply of isotopes as demanded by NFRP 8. However, the role of the HPRRs is far broader, as they are providing scientific and engineering solutions to questions of high societal importance.

Loading Laue Langevin Institute collaborators
Loading Laue Langevin Institute collaborators