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Las Tunas, Cuba

Perez K.A.,Las Tunas University | Pinol B.,National Center for Animal and Plant Health | Rosete Y.A.,Rothamsted Research | Rosete Y.A.,CABI Inc | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Phytopathology | Year: 2010

Transmission tests were conducted with field-collected Bunchy Top Symptoms (BTS) phytoplasma-infected specimens of Empoasca papayae. BTS developed in all eight inoculated papayas 3 months later. The BTS phytoplasma was identified in six of eight inoculated papayas, whose partial 16S rRNA sequence (GenBank Accession no. FJ6492000) was 99.9% identical with those from the collected papayas (GenBank Accession no FJ649198) and E. papayae (GenBank Accession no. FJ649199), all of which are members of group 16SrII, '. Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia'. Results confirmed the ability of E. papayae to transmit the BTS phytoplasma. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.


Acosta K.,Las Tunas University | Silva F.N.,Federal University of Vicosa | Silva F.N.,Santa Catarina State University | Zamora L.,National Center for Animal and Plant Health | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Plant Pathology | Year: 2015

An emerging soybean disease observed in Cuba was investigated in view of the possibility that a phytoplasma could be involved in its aetiology. Thirty-five soybean plants showing symptoms of stunting, chlorosis, crinkle and aborted seed pods were collected in Las Tunas and Holguin provinces during 2013, and analysed by nested- PCR with primers targeting the 16S ribosomal DNA (16S rDNA). Phytoplasmas were detected in 83% of symptomatic soybean plants. Conventional and virtual RFLP analyses of 16S rDNA sequences revealed the presence of strains of ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris’ (16SrI group). Phytoplasmas belonging to ribosomal subgroup 16SrI-B and two putative new ribosomal subgroups 16SrI-W and 16SrI-Y were identified. Phylogenetic analysis corroborated the RFLP analyses, in which the Cuban strains formed a clade with representative sequences of the 16SrI group. 16SrI-B was the most prevalent subgroup (45% of positive samples) and mixed infections of different subgroups were observed (10% of the positive samples). The partial 16S rDNA sequences of three strains showed 99% nucleotide identity to several GenBank sequences of group 16SrI phytoplasmas, including a phytoplasma associated with a soybean disease in Brazil. This is the first report of a phytoplasma belonging to the 16SrI subgroup occurring in soybean in Cuba. © 2015, Edizioni ETS. All rights reserved.


Objective: Determine the usefulness of immunoinformatics tools to detect potentially immunodominant peptides, and evaluate the differences between the immune responses provided by the animal models used in preclinical and human studies. Methods: Modeling was conducted of the response to two exogenous proteins: recombinant streptokinase and hepatitis B surface antigen. Based on their primary sequences, algorithms were used to identify B and T epitopes against HLA class I and II molecules (HLA-A*0201, HLA-DRB1*0301 and HLA-DRB1*0701), and murine haplotypes H2-Kd and H2-Kk. The highest scoring peptides were chosen. Results: ABCPred algorithm showed a better prediction capacity for B epitopes, whereas coincidence was greater in modeling programs for the T response. The epitopes generated for haplotype H2-Kk had greater similitude with those presented by the HLA molecules selected. Conclusions: A methodology is presented which is applicable to the development of subunit and multiepitope vaccines, as well as other peptidic biotechnological drugs. This methodology allows optimization of the preclinical and clinical phases at a very low cost, with minimal technological requirements, optimal use of media, and resources and human capital available at any institution of the national health system.


Estevez M.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery | Machado C.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery | Leisman G.,National Institute of Brain and Rehabilitation science | Leisman G.,University of Habana | And 4 more authors.
International Journal on Disability and Human Development | Year: 2016

Spectral analysis (SA) has been extensively applied to the assessment of heart rate variability. Traditional methods require the transformation of the original non-uniformly spaced electrocardiogram RR interval series into regularly spaced ones using interpolation or other approaches. The Lomb-Scargle (L-S) method uses the raw original RR series, avoiding different artifacts introduced by traditional SA methods, but it has been scarcely used in clinical settings. An RR series was recorded from 120 healthy participants (17-25 years) of both genders during a resting condition using four SA methods, including the Classic modified periodogram, the Welch procedure, the autoregressive Burg method and the L-S method. The efficient implementation of the L-S algorithm with the added possibility of the application of a set of options for the RR series pre-processing developed by Eleuteri et al., and also the results obtained in this study, show that the L-S method can be a good choice for future clinical studies. The L-S method seems particularly useful when the heart rates of studied participants will be below 60 or over 120 beats per minute. Nevertheless, it is important to the development of a smoothing procedure for the L-S spectra to avoid the picky behavior of the L-S power spectrum. The implementation of the L-S algorithm used in this study has been recently published by other authors included in our references, and brings some particular filtering features. The results obtained, comparing the four spectral methods, show that this implementation seems particularly useful when the heart rates of studied participants will be below 60 or over 120 beats per minute. Nevertheless, it is important to recommend for all existing L-S software implementations, the development of a smoothing procedure to avoid the picky behavior of the L-S power spectrum. © 2016 by De Gruyter.


Acosta K.,Las Tunas University | Zamora L.,National Center for Animal and Plant Health | Pinol B.,National Center for Animal and Plant Health | Fernandez A.,Las Tunas University | And 6 more authors.
Crop Protection | Year: 2013

Two different papaya diseases have been previously reported in Cuba, Bunchy Top Symptom (BTS) associated with a phytoplasma of group 16SrII '. Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia' and Papaya Bunchy Top (PBT), associated with a rickettsia. Regarding the regional phytosanitary impact of both diseases for the papaya crop, the present study investigated the occurrence of BTS and PBT in papaya fields in Cuba, and the possible mixed infection of phytoplasma and rickettsia pathogens associated. Papaya plants showing symptoms of BTS or PBT or both, were collected in Las Tunas and Havana provinces from January 2009 to February 2010, and evaluated for phytoplasma and rickettsia by PCR with primers targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA and the rickettsial succinate deshydrogenase (sdhA) genes, respectively. Phytoplasmas and rickettsia were individually detected in 76/86 BTS-symptomatic and 22/22 PBT-symptomatic papaya plants, and simultaneously detected in 5/86 (5.81%) of the BTS-symptomatic and 17/22 (77.27%) of the PBT-symptomatic plants. Conventional and virtual RFLP analyses of the 16S rDNA sequences revealed the presence of phytoplasmas of group 16SrI '. Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris' and 16SrII in papaya plants affected by BTS and PBT, and identified two new phytoplasma subgroups, 16SrI-X and 16SrII-N in papayas fields of Las Tunas, which was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. The partial rickettsia sdhA gene sequences were 100% identical to that of the rickettsia associated with PBT in Puerto Rico. Results confirm that phytoplasmas are consistently associated with both BTS and PBT symptoms, and that mixed infections of phytoplasma and rickettsia pathogens can occur in either BTS or PBT-affected papaya fields, which implies new epidemiological constraints for the disease control. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

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