Lanzhou, China
Lanzhou, China

Lanzhou University is a major research university in Lanzhou, Gansu Province, China. Founded in 1909, it is one of the key universities under China's Ministry of Education . It provides programs for undergraduate, graduate students on four campuses—three in Lanzhou city centre and one in Yuzhong County, about 30 miles away from the main campus. Total enrolment is approximately 20,000. Undergraduate students study at the Yuzhong campus. There are 6 National Bases for the Training of Researching and Teaching personnel for Fundamental Disciplines. The University operates an additional 35 institutes along with 1 national key Laboratory of the Applied Organic and 3 key laboratories of Arid and Grassland Ecology, West China Environment, Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, a key laboratory of Grassland Agro-ecosystem of the Ministry of Agriculture. Lanzhou University was one of the first universities entitled to enroll Bachelor Master’s and Doctoral degree candidates in 1981. Lanzhou University is one of the top ten universities in contributions to academic publications in international journals frequently cited by ongoing research from around the world. Wikipedia.


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Disclosed is a use of Dianxianning in the preparation of a medicament for preventing or treating Alzheimers disease. As indicated by the experiments, Dianxianning has a significant inhibiting effect on palsy phenotype in pathological models of animals with Alzheimers disease, and this indicates that Dianxianning can be used to prevent or treat Alzheimers disease.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Lanzhou, a city at the Yellow River valley in the country's arid northwest, was once among China's most polluted cities. Pollution was so bad that people even joked that the town did not show up on satellite images. Strong pollution control measures have lowered PM10 and PM2.5 densities in the city to less than 75 percent of 2013 levels. Last year, the annual number of blue sky days increased by 50 to reach 243. The provincial capital has become "a model of air quality improvement," according to a central inspection team. Annual coal consumption in the city has been reduced from 10 million tonnes in 2012 to around six million tonnes last year. One of the things Lanzhou has done is to rally grassroots officials into the battle. Yang Mingyan, a subdistrict office clerk, is one of the 10,000 pollution supervisors in the city. "Every morning, I check the area I am responsible for to see who is burning what, and whether substandard coal or wood are being used. If I find a problem, I will ask whoever is responsible to stop. If they do not listen to me, I will report the matter to superior authorities." All cities have anti-pollution policies, but in Lanzhou these policies are very strictly imposed. "Some cities are afraid of or unable to deal with big companies in environmental protection, fearing it will affect their economy, but Lanzhou doesn't have such problems," said Xing Lifeng, deputy director of Lanzhou Environmental Protection Bureau. The bureau even fined a leading state-owned petrochemical enterprise and has asked some companies to apologize to citizens. Some officials were punished for failing to properly apply themselves to their pollution control duties while others who showed more enthusiasm were promoted. "In fact, many of our measures are not very innovative, but in Lanzhou polluters are subject to the full force of the law," said Xing. Some heavily polluted cities, such as Shijiazhuang and Zhengzhou, have sent officials to Lanzhou to study its experiences first hand. "Many of Lanzhou's successes could easily be transplanted to other places," said Ma Jianmin of Lanzhou University. "For example, online monitoring data is all well and good, but it is a standard practice in Lanzhou for personnel to actually visit big polluters and see for themselves exactly what is going on," he said. The government expects good air quality days to account for more than 80 percent of all days in all cities at prefectural level and above by 2020. It is an ambitious target, and one that has not been met yet in Lanzhou. "Lanzhou still has some way to go to meet the goal. Pollution decreases initially by dealing with that which is easiest to control. Pollution control is therefore increasingly difficult and our work becomes harder with every success," said Chen Yimin, a Lanzhou Environmental Protection Bureau official.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Lanzhou, a city at the Yellow River valley in the country's arid northwest, was once among China's most polluted cities. Pollution was so bad that people even joked that the town did not show up on satellite images. Strong pollution control measures have lowered PM10 and PM2.5 densities in the city to less than 75 percent of 2013 levels. Last year, the annual number of blue sky days increased by 50 to reach 243. The provincial capital has become "a model of air quality improvement," according to a central inspection team. Annual coal consumption in the city has been reduced from 10 million tonnes in 2012 to around six million tonnes last year. One of the things Lanzhou has done is to rally grassroots officials into the battle. Yang Mingyan, a subdistrict office clerk, is one of the 10,000 pollution supervisors in the city. "Every morning, I check the area I am responsible for to see who is burning what, and whether substandard coal or wood are being used. If I find a problem, I will ask whoever is responsible to stop. If they do not listen to me, I will report the matter to superior authorities." All cities have anti-pollution policies, but in Lanzhou these policies are very strictly imposed. "Some cities are afraid of or unable to deal with big companies in environmental protection, fearing it will affect their economy, but Lanzhou doesn't have such problems," said Xing Lifeng, deputy director of Lanzhou Environmental Protection Bureau. The bureau even fined a leading state-owned petrochemical enterprise and has asked some companies to apologize to citizens. Some officials were punished for failing to properly apply themselves to their pollution control duties while others who showed more enthusiasm were promoted. "In fact, many of our measures are not very innovative, but in Lanzhou polluters are subject to the full force of the law," said Xing. Some heavily polluted cities, such as Shijiazhuang and Zhengzhou, have sent officials to Lanzhou to study its experiences first hand. "Many of Lanzhou's successes could easily be transplanted to other places," said Ma Jianmin of Lanzhou University. "For example, online monitoring data is all well and good, but it is a standard practice in Lanzhou for personnel to actually visit big polluters and see for themselves exactly what is going on," he said. The government expects good air quality days to account for more than 80 percent of all days in all cities at prefectural level and above by 2020. It is an ambitious target, and one that has not been met yet in Lanzhou. "Lanzhou still has some way to go to meet the goal. Pollution decreases initially by dealing with that which is easiest to control. Pollution control is therefore increasingly difficult and our work becomes harder with every success," said Chen Yimin, a Lanzhou Environmental Protection Bureau official. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/across-china-industry-city-sets-example-of-action-in-pollution-control-300442433.html


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

LANZHOU, China, Apr. 20, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- It was with some reluctance that Ma Xiaobing upgraded his kebab stall by investing in a smoke control device, but he is doing much better business now. "In the past, we roasted four legs of lamb each day. Currently, we need about 20 a day," said Ma from Lanzhou, Gansu Province. "There are more diners and we are busier than ever." Lanzhou, a city at the Yellow River valley in the country's arid northwest, was once among China's most polluted cities. Pollution was so bad that people even joked that the town did not show up on satellite images. Strong pollution control measures have lowered PM10 and PM2.5 densities in the city to less than 75 percent of 2013 levels. Last year, the annual number of blue sky days increased by 50 to reach 243. The provincial capital has become "a model of air quality improvement," according to a central inspection team. Annual coal consumption in the city has been reduced from 10 million tonnes in 2012 to around six million tonnes last year. One of the things Lanzhou has done is to rally grassroots officials into the battle. Yang Mingyan, a subdistrict office clerk, is one of the 10,000 pollution supervisors in the city. "Every morning, I check the area I am responsible for to see who is burning what, and whether substandard coal or wood are being used. If I find a problem, I will ask whoever is responsible to stop. If they do not listen to me, I will report the matter to superior authorities." All cities have anti-pollution policies, but in Lanzhou these policies are very strictly imposed. "Some cities are afraid of or unable to deal with big companies in environmental protection, fearing it will affect their economy, but Lanzhou doesn't have such problems," said Xing Lifeng, deputy director of Lanzhou Environmental Protection Bureau. The bureau even fined a leading state-owned petrochemical enterprise and has asked some companies to apologize to citizens. Some officials were punished for failing to properly apply themselves to their pollution control duties while others who showed more enthusiasm were promoted. "In fact, many of our measures are not very innovative, but in Lanzhou polluters are subject to the full force of the law," said Xing. Some heavily polluted cities, such as Shijiazhuang and Zhengzhou, have sent officials to Lanzhou to study its experiences first hand. "Many of Lanzhou's successes could easily be transplanted to other places," said Ma Jianmin of Lanzhou University. "For example, online monitoring data is all well and good, but it is a standard practice in Lanzhou for personnel to actually visit big polluters and see for themselves exactly what is going on," he said. The government expects good air quality days to account for more than 80 percent of all days in all cities at prefectural level and above by 2020. It is an ambitious target, and one that has not been met yet in Lanzhou. "Lanzhou still has some way to go to meet the goal. Pollution decreases initially by dealing with that which is easiest to control. Pollution control is therefore increasingly difficult and our work becomes harder with every success," said Chen Yimin, a Lanzhou Environmental Protection Bureau official. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/across-china-industry-city-sets-example-of-action-in-pollution-control-300442433.html


Jiang X.,Lanzhou University | Wang R.,Lanzhou University
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2013

Researchers discuss the latest developments in catalytic asymmetric inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder (DA reaction. The catalytic asymmetric inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) reaction has emerged as a powerful and atom-economical tool for the stereoselective construction of functionalized six-membered rings with control of regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselectivity. It features mild reaction conditions, a tolerance of a diverse range of functional groups, and the easy construction of carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds, which allows facile, stereospecific entry into the formation of functionalized ring systems. The high density of functional groups and up to four stereocenters of the resulting products renders them exceptionally versatile synthetic intermediates. Researchers discuss the latest efforts and advances in asymmetric IEDDA reaction through catalytic methodologies including the Lewis acidic metal complexes or organic molecules-catalyzed asymmetric IEDDA reaction through the LUMO-lowering strategy.


Ding S.-Y.,Lanzhou University | Wang W.,Lanzhou University
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2013

Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) represent an exciting new type of porous organic materials, which are ingeniously constructed with organic building units via strong covalent bonds. The well-defined crystalline porous structures together with tailored functionalities have offered the COF materials superior potential in diverse applications, such as gas storage, adsorption, optoelectricity, and catalysis. Since the seminal work of Yaghi and co-workers in 2005, the rapid development in this research area has attracted intensive interest from researchers with diverse expertise. This critical review describes the state-of-the-art development in the design, synthesis, characterisation, and application of the crystalline porous COF materials. Our own opinions on further development of the COF materials are also presented for discussion (155 references).© The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.


Shang X.,Lanzhou University | Liu Z.-Q.,Lanzhou University
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2013

Transition metal-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative coupling reactions of Caryl-H bonds with Cvinyl-H bonds to generate a C aryl-Cvinyl bonds have been well developed in recent decades. However, only a few studies have focused on the direct C vinyl-Cvinyl bond formation via double Cvinyl-H bond activation. Recent developments in this active area have been highlighted in this tutorial review. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Li T.,Lanzhou University
Brain : a journal of neurology | Year: 2013

Stroke induces rapid activation and expansion of microglia, but the main source of microgliosis is controversial. Here we investigated the formation of microgliosis and infiltration of circulating cells in a photothrombosis stroke model by taking advantage of parabiosis and two-photon microscopy. We found that a small population of blood-derived CX3CR1(GFP/+) cells infiltrated the cerebral parenchyma, but these cells did not proliferate and were phenotypically distinguishable from resident microglia. CX3CR1(GFP/+) infiltrating cells also displayed different kinetics from reactive microglia. The number of CX3CR1(GFP/+) infiltrating cells peaked on Day 5 after stroke and then decreased. The decline of these infiltrating cells was associated with an active apoptotic process. In contrast, reactive microglia were recruited to the ischaemic area continuously during the first week after stroke induction. Immunohistology and in vivo two-photon imaging revealed that cells involved in the process of microgliosis were mainly derived from proliferating resident microglia. Expansion of microglia exhibited a consistent pattern and our in vivo data demonstrated for the first time that microglia underwent active division in regions surrounding the ischaemic core. Together, these results indicated that CX3CR1(GFP/+) infiltrating cells and reactive microglia represented two distinct populations of cells with different functions and therapeutic potentials for the treatment of stroke.


Zhao D.,Lanzhou University | Wang R.,Lanzhou University
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2012

The metal-catalyzed asymmetric addition of phosphorus nucleophiles is one of the most efficient and reliable approaches for the construction of new carbon-phosphorus bonds. In recent years, great achievements have been made in this area, and many powerful methods have been developed for these transformations with high efficiency, low ligand loading and excellent selectivity. This tutorial review covers recent efforts in the constructions of P-C bonds through asymmetric additions of phosphorus nucleophiles including dialkyl phosphites, secondary phosphine oxides and secondary phosphines. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.


Li J.,Lanzhou University
Current Opinion in Plant Biology | Year: 2010

Receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs) are transmembrane proteins crucial for cell-to-cell and cell-to-environment communications. The extracellular domain of a RLK is responsible for perception of a specific extracellular ligand to trigger a unique intercellular signaling cascade, often via phosphorylation of cellular proteins. The signal is then transduced to the nucleus of a cell where it alters gene expression. There are more than 610 RLKs in Arabidopsis thaliana, only a handful of them have been functionally characterized. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of a small group of RLKs named somatic embryogenesis receptor-like protein kinases (SERKs). SERKs act as coreceptors in multiple signaling pathways via their physical interactions with distinct ligand-binding RLKs. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

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