Lakhimpur Girls College

North Lakhimpur, India

Lakhimpur Girls College

North Lakhimpur, India
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Goswami P.,Gauhati University | Bhuyan S.,Lakhimpur Girls College | Barua A.G.,Gauhati University
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences India Section A - Physical Sciences | Year: 2017

Quasi-random model of molecular band absorption is used to simulate the intensities of high resolution lines of nitrogen in the frequency region 2045–2305 cm−1. A tunable laser beam of frequency between 3 and 5 μm is assumed to be passed through the atmosphere. Values of transmittance, averaged over intervals of 20 cm−1, are obtained for absorber nitrogen thicknesses 500 and 5000 atm-cm. Line-by-line model for calculating the absorption coefficient is next used to find the values of transmittance at the wavelengths of interest. Absorbance values obtained by both the models are compared vis-à-vis the experimental data. © 2017, The National Academy of Sciences, India.


Sarmah B.P.,Dibrugarh University | Baruah D.,Lakhimpur Girls College
Der Pharmacia Lettre | Year: 2015

The present study was conducted in Morikhaboloo beel(Wetland) of River Subansiri, Assam to evaluate the macrophytic diversity of the wetland for a period of one year i.e. from August2013 to July 2014. During the present investigation found a distinct seasonal variation in the distribution of macrophytes: based on importance value index, Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.), Ceratophyllum demursum L. and Trapa quadrispinosa Roxb. were dominant in the summer; E. crassipes and Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle were dominant in the winter; and Ceratophyllum submersum L., H. verticillata, E. crassipes and L. hexandra were dominant in the spring. The highest species diversity was observed in the summer, followed by winter and then spring. The luxuriant growth of aquatic macrophytes evinced the highly productive nature of the wetland, while the dominance of emergents among the growth forms indicates the encroachment of littoral vegetation, indicating a successional trend toward marsh meadow. Different diversity indices like Shannon-Weaver diversity index, Simpson diversity index, Menhinick diversity index, and Concentration of dominance were calculated among 61 species to show the plant communities structure of the wetland. Maximum values of Shannon- Weaver diversity index, Simpson diversity index and Menhinick diversity index were found during the summer season as it is active growth period of macrophytes whereas maximum concentration of dominance during the summer season reflects the dominance of few species due to high diversity of the macrophytes.


Baruah D.,Lakhimpur Girls College | Hazarika L.P.,North Lakhimpur College | Bakalial B.,Lakhimpur Girls College | Borah S.,Lakhimpur Girls College | And 2 more authors.
Environmentalist | Year: 2012

The Ganges River dolphin (Platanista gangetica Roxburgh) of Subansiri River may be in great danger of extinction due to the construction of the 2,000-MW Lower Subansiri Hydroelectric Project, which started in 2006. A recent survey indicates that there are now 29 Ganges dolphins, up from 21 in 2006. It is feared that drastic changes would occur in the downstream hydrology and ecology of the Subansiri River after the installation of the project, scheduled for 2012. The water discharge during a major part of the day in dry months would come down to a meager 6 cumecs from the present average of 450 cumecs (1 cumec is shorthand for cubic meter per second; also cms, or m 3/s (m 3s -1). Riverine mega fauna like the dolphin would be worst hit by this extremely low discharge. Dumping of an extra amount of sediment from different construction phases has already increased sediment load in the Subansiri downstream and degraded some earlier pockets of dolphin up to 20 km below the dam site. There is reason to believe that high sediment influx might have silted up some of the deeper pools downstream, a preferred habitat of dolphins, forcing them to congregate close to the confluence of the Subansiri. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Hazarika L.P.,North Lakhimpur College | Baruah D.,Lakhimpur Girls College | Dutta R.,Lakhimpur Girls College
Nature Environment and Pollution Technology | Year: 2010

Critically endangered Ganges River Dolphin {Platanista gangetica gangetica Roxb.) is found in substantial numbers in the downstream of Subansiri river, a major tributary of the River Brahmaputra. Best estimates of 21,23 and 26 dolphins were recorded in 2005-06, 2006-07 and 2007-08 respectively. Until recently, the Subansiri river was considered one of the safe havens for residential dolphin due to relatively healthy downstream environment coupled with awareness of river bank inhabitants. Water environment of the un-damming Subansiri river strongly influence the existence of dolphin population. However, compositional changes of their distribution may have occurred after regulation of the river by the 2000 MW Lower Subansiri Hydroelectric Projects, whose construction has begun. Only 25 cumec/sec water will be released to the downstream after operation of the project against the present minimum flow discharge of 188 cumec/sec. This huge irreversible reduction (87.60%) in water discharge will make the downstream extremely vulnerable for this lUCN's red listed mammal, the dolphin. Flushing of reservoir sediment will accelerate the degradation by increasing, decreasing the riverbed and water table respectively. To protect the ecological and social security of the downstream, in general, and Ganges dolphin in particular, the minimal environmental flows for long term sustaining of the recently declared India's national aquatic animal is to be calculated and executed accordingly.


Kakati S.S.,Lakhimpur Girls College
Nature Environment and Pollution Technology | Year: 2012

Heavy metals in water have severe toxicity towards aquatic life and human beings. In north-eastern region of India, increasing rate of heavy metal content in drinking water has become a matter of serious concern as it has adverse health affects at high concentration. Many researchers have already studied high concentration of arsenic and heavy metals in different districts in this region. In Lakhimpur district of Assam in India, no detailed study about arsenic and heavy metals in drinking water has been done till now. In order to assess the concentration of heavy metals in drinking water of Lakhimpur district of Assam, twenty locations were selected for the study. The analysis was carried out for three years from June 2005 to May 2008 covering four seasons in a year. Metals studied in the present investigation were Zn, Pb, Ni, Cu and As. From the analytical data, it was found that Cu and Zn concentration was within ISI permissible limit. The all season average values of Ni in all the sampling points were found within 0.1mg/L. Pb concentration was found to be at a higher level in almost all the sources. In 5% samples As content exceeded ISI limit of 0.05mg/L. Seasonal variations were also observed and high values were detected in monsoon season. Health survey in the district were also done with the help of a pre-prepared questionnaire and the over all health status was found to be not satisfactory. Most of the people in the district suffered from mild to severe gastrointestinal diseases. Though, arsenic concentration was high in a few locations, no case of arsenocosis has been reported till date.


The Environment Impact Assessment (EIA) report of the 2000 MW Lower Subansiri Hydroelectric Project prepared by the WAPCOS (Water and Power Consultancy Service, 2003) indicates that downstream survey was done only up to 7 km from the dam site without giving much importance to the actual scenario and avoiding some most crucial ecological aspects. In the report, insufficient records of terrestrial flora, phytoplanktons and fish diversity are given. No records of aquatic macrophytes, riparian flora, zooplanktons, avian fauna, floodplain crops, besides peoples' livelihood and diverse habitat provided by the river in its downstream are presented in the report. Especially the wetlands, associated and influenced by the unregulated Subansiri River did not find any place in the EIA report. Interestingly, no mention of the Ganges Dolphin--Platanista gangetica gangetica Roxb. could be found in the report, whereas the river provides a healthy habitat for a good number of this critically endangered fresh water dolphin. From our pre-impact study, it is clear that rich downstream ecology of the river with its present and existing environmental scenario will be adversely affected due to the construction and operation of the proposed project, and there will be distinct possibilities of elimination of other native species. In addition, people's livelihood will be affected largely through alteration of the flow regime of the river. In-depth study with comprehensive documentation of all biotic and abiotic parameters is obligatory before taking any decision about the operation of the 2000 MW Lower Subansiri Hydroelectric Project.


Buragohain M.,Lakhimpur Girls College | Sarma H.P.,Gauhati University
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment | Year: 2010

Seasonal variations in the concentrations of groundwater with respect to arsenic, lead, cadmium and aluminium has been studied in Dhemaji district of Assam, India. The water samples were collected from 20 different sites in both dry and wet seasons. The metals were analysed by using atomic absorption spectrometer, Perkin Elmer AAnalyst 200 model. The concentrations of aluminium, lead and cadmium in groundwater were found to be significantly elevated. High concentrations of all the metals were recorded in the dry season than in the wet season. Univariate statistics along with skewness, kurtosis and confidence limit have been calculated for both the seasons to test the distribution normality for each metal. Statistical analyses of the data reveal non-uniform distribution of the metals in the area. The metal contamination of groundwater in the district follows the trend Al > Pb > Cd > As in both the seasons. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


PubMed | Lakhimpur Girls College
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Environmental monitoring and assessment | Year: 2010

Seasonal variations in the concentrations of groundwater with respect to arsenic, lead, cadmium and aluminium has been studied in Dhemaji district of Assam, India. The water samples were collected from 20 different sites in both dry and wet seasons. The metals were analysed by using atomic absorption spectrometer, Perkin Elmer AAnalyst 200 model. The concentrations of aluminium, lead and cadmium in groundwater were found to be significantly elevated. High concentrations of all the metals were recorded in the dry season than in the wet season. Univariate statistics along with skewness, kurtosis and confidence limit have been calculated for both the seasons to test the distribution normality for each metal. Statistical analyses of the data reveal non-uniform distribution of the metals in the area. The metal contamination of groundwater in the district follows the trend Al>Pb>Cd>As in both the seasons.


PubMed | Lakhimpur Girls College
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of environmental science & engineering | Year: 2013

The Environment Impact Assessment (EIA) report of the 2000 MW Lower Subansiri Hydroelectric Project prepared by the WAPCOS (Water and Power Consultancy Service, 2003) indicates that downstream survey was done only up to 7 km from the dam site without giving much importance to the actual scenario and avoiding some most crucial ecological aspects. In the report, insufficient records of terrestrial flora, phytoplanktons and fish diversity are given. No records of aquatic macrophytes, riparian flora, zooplanktons, avian fauna, floodplain crops, besides peoples livelihood and diverse habitat provided by the river in its downstream are presented in the report. Especially the wetlands, associated and influenced by the unregulated Subansiri River did not find any place in the EIA report. Interestingly, no mention of the Ganges Dolphin--Platanista gangetica gangetica Roxb. could be found in the report, whereas the river provides a healthy habitat for a good number of this critically endangered fresh water dolphin. From our pre-impact study, it is clear that rich downstream ecology of the river with its present and existing environmental scenario will be adversely affected due to the construction and operation of the proposed project, and there will be distinct possibilities of elimination of other native species. In addition, peoples livelihood will be affected largely through alteration of the flow regime of the river. In-depth study with comprehensive documentation of all biotic and abiotic parameters is obligatory before taking any decision about the operation of the 2000 MW Lower Subansiri Hydroelectric Project.


Kakati S.S.,Lakhimpur Girls College
Nature Environment and Pollution Technology | Year: 2010

The quality of water varies widely with respect to its various uses, and the water quality suitable for one purpose may not be satisfactory for the other. Statistical studies have demonstrated significant inverse relationship between cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and water hardness even when the environmental and socioeconomic factors are taken into account The evidence that drinking water quality affects cardiovascular disease has been strengthened by recent research which has shown that very soft water increases CVD and mortality rates by 10%. Keeping this view in mind the assessment of water hardness of this region along with some polyvalent cations (Ca, Mg, Fe) has been carried out for three different seasons in a year. The study reveals that water quality in the study area falls under moderately hard (60-120mg/L) and hard (120-180mg/L). Also it was found that Fe content in the study area was very high as compared to the WHO value of safe drinking water, while other parameters (Ca, Mg) were within the WHO limit.

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