Plattsburgh, NY, United States
Plattsburgh, NY, United States

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Hrycik A.R.,Cornell University | Hrycik A.R.,Purdue University | Simonin P.W.,Cornell University | Rudstam L.G.,Cornell University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Great Lakes Research | Year: 2015

Mysid shrimp are important both as predators on zooplankton and as prey for a variety of fish species across most of the Laurentian Great Lakes. In Lake Champlain, where little is known about mysids, this may also be true. We evaluated the role of Mysis diluviana as a planktivore in Lake Champlain using hydroacoustics, gut content analysis, stable isotopes, cohort analysis, and bioenergetics models to estimate Mysis density, diets, growth rates, and prey consumption rates. Density of Mysis in the water column of the deeper Main Lake was lower in July-August of 2008-2011 (38, 38, 21, and 74Mysis/m2, respectively) than historical values from the 1970s. Mysis selectively foraged for cladocerans, but also consumed cyclopoid and calanoid copepods in 2011. Stable isotope data suggest a mostly carnivorous diet, although agreement between isotope mixing models and observed diets varied. Cohort analyses revealed growth rates ranging from 2.7mm/month in late spring to 1.3mm/month in late summer. In contrast to the offshore areas of Lake Ontario and Lake Huron, zooplankton consumption by the Mysis population was low relative to zooplankton density and production indicating that Mysis are not currently a major zooplanktivore in Lake Champlain. © 2015 International Association for Great Lakes Research..


Myers L.W.,Lake Champlain Research Institute | Kondratieff B.C.,Colorado State University | Mihuc T.B.,Lake Champlain Research Institute | Ruiter D.E.,6260 South Grant Street
Transactions of the American Entomological Society | Year: 2011

James Needham and Cornelius Betten in 1901 published one the first studies of aquatic insects in North America providing life history information for a number of taxa, and descriptions of 10 new species and two new genera from the Adirondacks in New York. However, since this early publication, relatively little taxonomic research and field surveys have been conducted targeting aquatic insects in the Adirondack Park. The diverse array of aquatic habitats present in New York harbors numerous aquatic insect taxa. Research funded by the NYSDEC State Wildlife Grants and the NYS Biodiversity Research Institute on Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera biodiversity in eastern New York have resulted in the first ever comprehensive assessment of aquatic insects in the region. Distributional records were obtained from primary literature, institutional collections and field surveys. During our four-year study of the Park more than 25,000 specimens from 465 locations were examined. We report 509 species of EPT from the Adirondack Park of which 99 are reported from New York State for the first time. Our field surveys have also resulted in the discovery of several species new to science and numerous species of conservation concern.


Ball S.C.,University of Vermont | Mihuc T.B.,Lake Champlain Research Institute | Myers L.W.,Lake Champlain Research Institute | Stockwell J.D.,University of Vermont
Journal of Great Lakes Research | Year: 2015

Mysis diluviana is an important mid-trophic level omnivore in many lakes, but studies of Mysis in Lake Champlain are rare. We used an unpublished 1975 study as a baseline to test for changes in contemporary Mysis populations in Lake Champlain. Invasive zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) were first reported in 1993 and 2003, respectively. Based on the negative relationships of these two species with Mysis and Mysis prey in the Great Lakes, we hypothesized a decline in Mysis in Lake Champlain since 1975 and tested this by repeating the 1975 study in 2012. We found a nearly ten-fold decrease in mean density (±SD) between 1975 (712±373individuals/m2) and 2012 (82±48individuals/m2; p=0.002). Despite the decline, Mysis growth rates appeared similar between the two studies, although fecundity significantly increased by 3 embryos/female in 2012 (p=0.002). Mysis vertical distribution appeared similar in both years, while the horizontal distribution appeared limited to deeper bathymetric strata in 2012 compared to 1975. Data from a long-term monitoring program from 1992 to 2008 indicate the decline occurred abruptly in the mid-1990s, which coincided with zebra mussel establishment although a direct link between the two is not evident. Alewife did not invade Lake Champlain until 2003 and can be ruled out as a contributing factor to the decline. We hypothesize that the combination of predation by alewife and smelt and shifts in the planktonic food web may prevent Mysis from recovering to pre-1995 densities. © 2015 International Association for Great Lakes Research..


Mihuc T.B.,Lake Champlain Research Institute | Dunlap F.,NY Environmental Conservation | Binggeli C.,Lake Champlain Research Institute | Myers L.,Lake Champlain Research Institute | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Great Lakes Research | Year: 2012

We examined patterns in Lake Champlain zooplankton abundance from 1992 to 2010 using summer data from five study sites. Rotifer abundance (#/m 3) for many common taxa such as Polyarthra, Kellicottia, and Keratella declined lakewide in the mid-1990s which coincided with the invasion of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) into Lake Champlain. The only rotifer to increase in density following zebra mussel invasion was Conochilus which is a colonial species. Long-term shifts in copepod and cladoceran community composition can be attributed to the arrival of another invasive species in 2004-2005, the alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus). Our results support previous findings that alewife predation can impact larger bodied zooplankton within temperate lake systems. Following alewife invasion into Lake Champlain, body length of Leptodiaptomus and Daphnia retrocurva decreased to a size at or below known alewife feeding preferences. In addition, smaller bodied copepods (primarily Diacyclops thomasi) have increased in abundance since alewife invasion while juvenile copepods have declined. Our results suggest that post-alewife zooplankton patterns are most likely due to alewife size-selective feeding strategies. Observed long-term changes in zooplankton community structure have potential implications for the lake's food web dynamics, particularly recent declines in large bodied zooplankton which may release smaller plankton from top-down control. © 2011.


Facey D.E.,Saint Michael's College | Marsden J.E.,University of Vermont | Mihuc T.B.,Lake Champlain Research Institute | Howe E.A.,Lake Champlain Basin Program
Journal of Great Lakes Research | Year: 2012

Lake Champlain shares a geological history with the Great Lakes and, as part of the St. Lawrence drainage, also shares biological and ecological similarities. The complex bathymetry and extensive shoreline provide a variety of lacustrine habitats, from deep oligotrophic areas to shallow bays that are highly eutrophic. The large basin:lake ratio (19:1) makes Lake Champlain vulnerable to impacts associated with land use, and in some parts of the lake these impacts are further exacerbated by limited water exchange among lake segments due to both natural and anthropogenic barriers. Research in Lake Champlain and the surrounding basin has expanded considerably since the 1970s, with a particularly dramatic increase since the early 1990s. This special issue of the Journal of Great Lakes Research brings together 16 reports from recent research and monitoring efforts in Lake Champlain. The papers cover a variety of topics but primarily focus on lake hydrodynamics; historical and recent chemical changes in the lake; phosphorus loading; recent changes in populations of phytoplankton, zooplankton, and fishes; impacts of invasive species; recreational use; and the challenges of management decision-making in a lake that falls within the legal jurisdictions of two U.S. states, one Canadian province, two national governments, and the International Joint Commission. The papers provide not only evaluations of progress on some critical management issues but also valuable reference points for future research. © 2011 International Association for Great Lakes Research.

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